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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 403495 matches for " Gray Heather M. "
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Measurement of the b-jet cross-section with associated vector boson production with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC
Gray Heather M.
EPJ Web of Conferences , 2012, DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/20122812050
Abstract: A measurement of the cross-section for vector boson production in association with jets containing b-hadrons is presented using 35 pb-1 of data from the LHC collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2010. Such processes are not only important tests of pQCD but also large, irreducible backgrounds to searches such as a low mass Higgs boson decaying to pairs of b-quarks when the Higgs is produced in association with a vector boson. Theoretical predictions of the V+b production rate have large uncertainties and previous measurements have reported discrepancies. Cross-sections measured using in the electron and muon channels will be shown. Comparisons will be made to recent theoretical predictions at the next-to-leading order in αS.
Measurement of the b-jet cross-section with associated vector boson production with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC
Heather M. Gray on behalf of the ATLAS Collaboration
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: A measurement of the cross-section for vector boson production in association with jets containing b-hadrons is presented using 35 pb-1 of data from the LHC collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2010. Such processes are not only important tests of pQCD but also large, irreducible backgrounds to searches such as a low mass Higgs boson decaying to pairs of b-quarks when the Higgs is produced in association with a vector boson. Theoretical predictions of the V+b production rate have large uncertainties and previous measurements have reported discrepancies. Cross-sections measured using in the electron and muon channels will be shown. Comparisons will be made to recent theoretical predictions at the next-to-leading order in alpha_s.
Kin discrimination in cannibalistic tadpoles of the Green Poison Frog, Dendrobates auratus (Anura, Dendrobatidae)
Heather M. Gray,Kyle Summers,Roberto Ibá?ez D.
Phyllomedusa : Journal of Herpetology , 2009,
Abstract: Cannibalizing a related individual can reduce the inclusive fitness of the cannibal. Hence, mechanisms that allow a tadpole to recognize and modify its behavior toward kin may reduce the inclusive fitness costs of cannibalism. Alternatively, ecological factors may cause preferential treatment of kin to be too costly to be favored by selection. We tested these two predictions in the Green Poison Frog, Dendrobates auratus. The effect of kinship on larval cannibalism was examined through a series of kin-discrimination trials. The behavior of large tadpoles was observed when presented with two small, tethered tadpoles, one a clutchmate and one an unrelated tadpole. In these simultaneous presentation tests, tadpoles displayed a significant preference for attacking kin. In a series of timed trials, pairs of unequally sized tadpoles were placed together in containers. The majority (70%) of large tadpoles took less than24 hr to consume the small tadpole. Kinship did not affect the survival time of the small tadpole. Our results are consistent with observations that D. auratus is an indiscriminate predator. As conspecifics may be serious competitors, their swift elimination would be an advantage, particularly in the small, nutrient-poor poolsused by this species.
Scientific justification for the participation of children and adolescents in HIV-1 vaccine trials in South Africa
Heather B Jaspan, Linda-Gail Bekker, Glenda E Gray, Andrew KL Robinson, Hoosen M Coovadia
South African Medical Journal , 2005,
Abstract:
Intra- and Inter-clade Cross-reactivity by HIV-1 Gag Specific T-Cells Reveals Exclusive and Commonly Targeted Regions: Implications for Current Vaccine Trials
Lycias Zembe, Wendy A. Burgers, Heather B. Jaspan, Linda-Gail Bekker, Helba Bredell, Gwynneth Stevens, Jill Gilmour, Josephine H. Cox, Patricia Fast, Peter Hayes, Eftyhia Vardas, Carolyn Williamson, Clive M. Gray
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0026096
Abstract: The genetic diversity of HIV-1 across the globe is a major challenge for developing an HIV vaccine. To facilitate immunogen design, it is important to characterize clusters of commonly targeted T-cell epitopes across different HIV clades. To address this, we examined 39 HIV-1 clade C infected individuals for IFN-γ Gag-specific T-cell responses using five sets of overlapping peptides, two sets matching clade C vaccine candidates derived from strains from South Africa and China, and three peptide sets corresponding to consensus clades A, B, and D sequences. The magnitude and breadth of T-cell responses against the two clade C peptide sets did not differ, however clade C peptides were preferentially recognized compared to the other peptide sets. A total of 84 peptides were recognized, of which 19 were exclusively from clade C, 8 exclusively from clade B, one peptide each from A and D and 17 were commonly recognized by clade A, B, C and D. The entropy of the exclusively recognized peptides was significantly higher than that of commonly recognized peptides (p = 0.0128) and the median peptide processing scores were significantly higher for the peptide variants recognized versus those not recognized (p = 0.0001). Consistent with these results, the predicted Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I IC50 values were significantly lower for the recognized peptide variants compared to those not recognized in the ELISPOT assay (p<0.0001), suggesting that peptide variation between clades, resulting in lack of cross-clade recognition, has been shaped by host immune selection pressure. Overall, our study shows that clade C infected individuals recognize clade C peptides with greater frequency and higher magnitude than other clades, and that a selection of highly conserved epitope regions within Gag are commonly recognized and give rise to cross-clade reactivities.
Multi-Band Rectangular Patch End-Fire Antenna Array  [PDF]
Liza M. Resley, Heather H. Song
Journal of Electromagnetic Analysis and Applications (JEMAA) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jemaa.2013.52010
Abstract:

A novel multi-band end-fire antenna array was designed, fabricated, and characterized. Analytical calculations were carried out to determine the critical antenna dimensions and the design was optimized using a 3D electromagnetic finite-element solver. The measured results were in good agreement with the designed results. The proposed antenna array exhibits multi-band capabilities which can be potentially used for applications that require a multi-band end-fire radiation pattern.

Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development
William M. Gray
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020311
Abstract:
Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development
William M Gray
PLOS Biology , 2004, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0020311
Abstract:
Microbiologists Just Want to Have Fun
Heather M. Seitz
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education , 2012, DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v13i2.490
Abstract: Review of: Non-technical online microbial resources that entertain, engage, and promote microbiology thorugh music, comics, and gaming. Resources include Food Safety Music, Pandemic 2, Microbe Kombat, and The Great Flu.
Testing for Heterogeneous Factor Loadings Using Mixtures of Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models
Heather M. Buzick
Frontiers in Psychology , 2010, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2010.00165
Abstract: The current study assessed the viability of mixture confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) for measurement invariance testing by evaluating the ability of mixture CFA models to identify differences in factor loadings across populations with identical mean structures. Using simulated data from a model with known parameters, convergence rates, parameter recovery, and the power of the likelihood-ratio test were investigated as impacted by sample size, latent class proportions, magnitude of factor loading differences, percentage of non-invariant factor loadings, and pattern of non-invariant factor loadings. Results suggest that mixture CFA models may be a viable option for testing the invariance of factor loadings; however, without differences in latent means and measurement intercepts, results suggest that larger sample sizes, more non-invariant factor loadings, and larger amounts of heterogeneity are needed to successfully estimate parameters and detect differences across latent classes.
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