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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 22 matches for " Gilroy "
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Plant Cell Biology: With Grand Challenges Come Great Possibilities
Simon Gilroy
Frontiers in Plant Science , 2011, DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2011.00003
Abstract:
Economics of Pooling Small Local Electricity Prosumers—Prosumer vs Business as Usual Approach  [PDF]
Peter K?stel, Bryce Gilroy-Scott
Energy and Power Engineering (EPE) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/epe.2018.105016
Abstract: This paper analyses the economics of pooling small UK based local electricity prosumers with back-up access to the National Grid and compares it to the current conventional UK electricity supply model—business as usual (BAU) approach. This is contextualized against the UK energy market framework, prosumer research and changing energy market dynamics. For the economic assessment a three-tiered production/supply and consumption model is developed based on site specific levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and other cost parameter to operate the model. Modeling results indicated the economic feasibility and advantage of a prosumer approach in a significant number of modeling scenarios. Additionally, a break-even analysis for the two approaches was undertaken to understand the sensitivity of individual input parameters.
New insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of aspirin- induction of nitric oxide through the generation of epi-lipoxins
Gilroy, Derek W;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02762005000900009
Abstract: aspirin has always remained an enigmatic drug. not only does it present with new benefits for treating an ever-expanding list of apparently unrelated diseases at an astounding rate but also because aspirin enhances our understanding of the nature of these diseases processe. originally, the beneficial effects of aspirin were shown to stem from its inhibition of cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins, fatty acid metabolites that modulate host defense. however, in addition to inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity aspirin can also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling pathways, gene expression and other factors distinct from eicosanoid biosynthesis that drive inflammation as well as enhance the synthesis of endogenous protective anti-inflammatory factors. its true mechanism of action in anti-inflammation remains unclear. here the data from a series of recent experiments proposing that one of aspirin's predominant roles in inflammation is the induction of nitric oxide, which potently inhibits leukocyte/endothelium interaction during acute inflammation, will be discussed. it will be argued that this nitric oxide-inducing effects are exclusive to aspirin due to its unique ability, among the family of traditional anti-inflammatory drugs, to acetylate the active site of inducible cyclooxygenase and generate a family of lipid mediators called the epi-lipoxins that are increasingly being shown to have profound roles in a range of host defense responses.
Genus Two Zhu Theory for Vertex Operator Algebras
Thomas Gilroy,Michael P. Tuite
Mathematics , 2015,
Abstract: We consider correlation functions for a vertex operator algebra on a genus two Riemann surface formed by sewing two tori together. We describe a generalisation of genus one Zhu recursion expressing an arbitrary genus two $n$--point correlation function in terms of $(n-1)$--point functions. We consider several applications including the correlation functions for the Heisenberg vertex operator algebra and its modules, Virasoro correlation functions and genus two Ward identities. We derive novel differential equations in terms of a differential operator on the genus two Siegel upper half plane for holomorphic $1$--forms, the normalised bidifferential of the second kind and the Heisenberg partition function. We also prove that the holomorphic mapping from the sewing parameter domain to the Siegel upper half plane is injective but not surjective.
The Impact of the C-Terminal Domain on the Interaction of Human DNA Topoisomerase II α and β with DNA
Kathryn L. Gilroy,Caroline A. Austin
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0014693
Abstract: Type II DNA topoisomerases are essential, ubiquitous enzymes that act to relieve topological problems arising in DNA from normal cellular activity. Their mechanism of action involves the ATP-dependent transport of one DNA duplex through a transient break in a second DNA duplex; metal ions are essential for strand passage. Humans have two isoforms, topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ, that have distinct roles in the cell. The C-terminal domain has been linked to isoform specific differences in activity and DNA interaction.
Mate-Finding as an Overlooked Critical Determinant of Dispersal Variation in Sexually-Reproducing Animals
James J. Gilroy, Julie L. Lockwood
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0038091
Abstract: Dispersal is a critically important process in ecology, but robust predictive models of animal dispersal remain elusive. We identify a potentially ubiquitous component of variation in animal dispersal that has been largely overlooked until now: the influence of mate encounters on settlement probability. We use an individual-based model to simulate dispersal in sexually-reproducing organisms that follow a simple set of movement rules based on conspecific encounters, within an environment lacking spatial habitat heterogeneity. We show that dispersal distances vary dramatically with fluctuations in population density in such a model, even in the absence of variation in dispersive traits between individuals. In a simple random-walk model with promiscuous mating, dispersal distributions become increasingly ‘fat-tailed’ at low population densities due to the increasing scarcity of mates. Similar variation arises in models incorporating territoriality. In a model with polygynous mating, we show that patterns of sex-biased dispersal can even be reversed across a gradient of population density, despite underlying dispersal mechanisms remaining unchanged. We show that some widespread dispersal patterns found in nature (e.g. fat tailed distributions) can arise as a result of demographic variability in the absence of heterogeneity in dispersive traits across the population. This implies that models in which individual dispersal distances are considered to be fixed traits might be unrealistic, as dispersal distances vary widely under a single dispersal mechanism when settlement is influenced by mate encounters. Mechanistic models offer a promising means of advancing our understanding of dispersal in sexually-reproducing organisms.
Clinical severity and local inflammatory responses in animal models of sepsis
S Saeed, D Gilroy, M Singer
Critical Care , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/cc8242
Abstract: Intraperitoneal faecal slurry (FS) or zymosan was given to induce acute peritonitis in 11 and 12 male C57/Bl mice (8 to 12 weeks, 18 to 32 g). A control group received saline only (n = 5). In surviving animals at 24 hours, clinical severity was scored as severe, moderate or mild according to appearance and alertness. Peritoneal lavage was performed to obtain immune cells. Analysis by antibody labelling (F4/80, GR-1, CD3 and CD19) for fluorescence-assisted cell sorting identified numbers of macrophages, neutrophils, T and B cells. Logistic regression (odds ratio, OR) was used to determine the relationship of cell numbers with severity (reported if P < 0.05).Clinical severity varied markedly despite similar dosing (see Table 1). At 24 hours, total intraperitoneal immune cells increased in both models and with clinical severity (OR 0.83). Neutrophils predominated after septic insult and also rose with severity (OR 0.75). Compared with control, macrophage populations did not change in either model while B and T lymphocytes fell. A cell population that expressed both F4/80 and GR-1 - that is, markers for macrophages and neutrophils, respectively - occurred only in the FS model.Individual variability occurs in both faecal and zymosan peritonitis models as shown by heterogeneous clinical responses and local immune cell numbers to the same dose in similar animals. The cellular immune response in both models is consistent with current understanding of infection-induced inflammation. Neutrophils, but not macrophages, rose in proportion to worsening clinical severity. The significance of F4/80+/GR-1+ cells in the FS model requires further evaluation.
New Perspectives on Aspirin and the Endogenous Control of Acute Inflammatory Resolution
Thea Morris,Melanie Stables,Derek W. Gilroy
The Scientific World Journal , 2006, DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2006.192
Abstract:
Inferior Vena Cava Torsion and Stenosis Complicated by Compressive Pericaval Regional Ascites following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation
Adam Alli,Richard Gilroy,Philip Johnson
Case Reports in Radiology , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/576092
Abstract: Inferior vena cava (IVC) stenosis and torsion are well-described rare complications following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We present a case of inferior vena cava intermittent torsion and stenosis complicated by compressive regional ascites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of post-OLT regional ascites related compressive IVC stenosis reported and the first reported case of torsion complicated by regional ascites compression. 1. Introduction We report the case of inferior vena cava (IVC) torsion following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) complicated by compression secondary to compressive regional ascites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of post-OLT ascites related compressive IVC stenosis reported and the first reported case of torsion complicated by regional ascites compression. 2. Case Report A 51-year-old male with Hepatitis C cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma underwent piggyback orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). During the immediate postoperative period, the patient had typical recovery with postoperative sonographic interrogation demonstrating expected perioperative edema. Increased velocities were reported near the inferior vena and portal veins which resolved with improving perioperative edema. No additional vascular compromise was identified in the immediate postoperative period. The patient presented 4 weeks following OLT with shortness of breath and was found to have bilateral pleural effusions, recurrent ascites, and acute renal insufficiency. The findings were all assumed to be related to OLT vascular compromise. Thoracentesis and paracentesis (3 liters of ascitic fluid drained) were performed, and the following day ultrasound and Doppler imaging were performed to evaluate the hepatic vasculature. This revealed mild ascites without evidence of hepatic vascular compromise. Clinically, the patient demonstrated no improvement and had additional paracentesis 3 days following admission in which 5 liters of ascitic fluid was drained. On the 10th day following admission, laparoscopic exploration of the abdomen with liver biopsy and lysis of adhesions was performed. The liver biopsy revealed sinusoidal congestion without evidence of hepatic graft rejection or malignancy. On the 13th day following admission, repeat ultrasound with Doppler imaging demonstrated severe stenosis of the intrahepatic vena cava, portal hypertension, and perihepatic ascites. The stenosis was shown to be worse in the supine position. The following day, inferior vena cavagram was performed demonstrating
Antenna and Base-Station Diversity for WSN Livestock Monitoring  [PDF]
Konstantinos SASLOGLOU, Ian A. GLOVER, Hock Guan GOH, Kae Hsiang KWONG, Michael P. GILROY, Christos TACHTATZIS, Craig MICHIE, Ivan ANDONOVIC
Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) , 2009, DOI: 10.4236/wsn.2009.15047
Abstract: Antenna and base-station diversity have been applied to a wireless sensor network for the monitoring of live-stock. A field trial has been described and the advantage to be gained in a practical environment has been assessed.
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