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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 146326 matches for " Gerald F. Kutish "
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Analysis of the Genome of the Sexually Transmitted Insect Virus Helicoverpa zea Nudivirus 2
John P. Burand,Woojin Kim,Claudio L. Afonso,Edan R. Tulman,Gerald F. Kutish,Zhiqiang Lu,Daniel L. Rock
Viruses , 2012, DOI: 10.3390/v4010028
Abstract: The sexually transmitted insect virus Helicoverpa zea nudivirus 2 (HzNV-2) was determined to have a circular double-stranded DNA genome of 231,621 bp coding for an estimated 113 open reading frames (ORFs). HzNV-2 is most closely related to the nudiviruses, a sister group of the insect baculoviruses. Several putative ORFs that share homology with the baculovirus core genes were identified in the viral genome. However, HzNV-2 lacks several key genetic features of baculoviruses including the late transcriptional regulation factor, LEF-1 and the palindromic hrs, which serve as origins of replication. The HzNV-2 genome was found to code for three ORFs that had significant sequence homology to cellular genes which are not generally found in viral genomes. These included a presumed juvenile hormone esterase gene, a gene coding for a putative zinc-dependent matrix metalloprotease, and a major facilitator superfamily protein gene; all of which are believed to play a role in the cellular proliferation and the tissue hypertrophy observed in the malformation of reproductive organs observed in HzNV-2 infected corn earworm moths, Helicoverpa zea.
Fixed points via a generalized local commutativity: the compact case
Gerald F. Jungck
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences , 2003, DOI: 10.1155/s0161171203107077
Abstract: In an earlier paper, the concept of semigroups of self-maps which are nearly commutative at a function g:X→X was introduced. We now continue the investigation, but with emphasis on the compact case. Fixed-point theorems for such semigroups are obtained in the setting of semimetric and metric spaces.
Fixed points via a generalized local commutativity
Gerald F. Jungck
International Journal of Mathematics and Mathematical Sciences , 2001, DOI: 10.1155/s0161171201005312
Abstract: Let g:X→X. The concept of a semigroup of maps which is “nearly commutative at g” is introduced. We thereby obtain new fixed point theorems for functions with bounded orbit(s) which generalize a recent theorem by Huang and Hong, and results by Jachymski, Jungck, Ohta, and Nikaido, Rhoades and Watson, and others.
Bit by Bit: The Darwinian Basis of Life
Gerald F. Joyce
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001323
Abstract: All known examples of life belong to the same biology, but there is increasing enthusiasm among astronomers, astrobiologists, and synthetic biologists that other forms of life may soon be discovered or synthesized. This enthusiasm should be tempered by the fact that the probability for life to originate is not known. As a guiding principle in parsing potential examples of alternative life, one should ask: How many heritable “bits” of information are involved, and where did they come from? A genetic system that contains more bits than the number that were required to initiate its operation might reasonably be considered a new form of life.
Treating patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol: choices, issues and opportunities
Gerald F Watts
Trials , 2001, DOI: 10.1186/cvm-2-3-118
Abstract: Low plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration is encountered in clinical practice as part of mixed hyperlipidaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, or as an isolated abnormality. Low HDL-cholesterol is common among patients with premature coronary artery disease (CAD) [1]. The cardioprotective effect of HDL-cholesterol is well supported by both observational and experimental studies [2]. Although the favourable effect of lowering elevated plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol has been well emphasized [3,4,5], the therapeutic benefits of raising low HDL-cholesterol has only recently been demonstrated in clinical trials. The present review describes the evidence and implications of these recent trials, and places them into the wider context of the management of patients with low HDL-cholesterol.Table 1 compares the characteristics and outcomes of three clinical trials that employed a fibrate or a statin in patients with low plasma HDL-cholesterol [6,7,8]. VA-HIT [6] was a secondary prevention study that examined the effect of gemfibrozil (1200 mg/day) on the combined incidence of nonfatal myocardial infarction and death from CAD in middle-aged men. Many patients exhibited the metabolic syndrome (obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, insulin resistance), and 25% had diabetes. The trial was carried out over a mean period of 5 years. The BIP study [7] was a secondary prevention study of the effect of bezafibrate retard (400 mg/day) on myocardial infarction and sudden death in middle-aged persons, most of whom were men and 10% of whom had diabetes. It lasted for approximately 6 years. AFCAPS/TexCAPS [8] was a primary prevention trial of the effect of lovastatin (20-40 mg/day) on first major acute coronary events in middle-aged persons, most of whom were male and only 3% of whom had diabetes. Its duration was approximately 5 years.The entry plasma HDL-cholesterol level was lower in VA-HIT than in the BIP study and AFCAPS/TexCAPS, and the LDL-cholesterol at entry in the latter
Common fixed point theorems for compatible self-maps of Hausdorff topological spaces
Jungck Gerald F
Fixed Point Theory and Applications , 2005,
Abstract: The concept of proper orbits of a map is introduced and results of the following type are obtained. If a continuous self-map of a Hausdorff topological space has relatively compact proper orbits, then has a fixed point. In fact, has a common fixed point with every continuous self-map of which is nontrivially compatible with . A collection of metric and semimetric space fixed point theorems follows as a consequence. Specifically, a theorem by Kirk regarding diminishing orbital diameters is generalized, and a fixed point theorem for maps with no recurrent points is proved.
Common fixed point theorems for compatible self-maps of Hausdorff topological spaces
Gerald F. Jungck
Fixed Point Theory and Applications , 2005, DOI: 10.1155/fpta.2005.355
Abstract: The concept of proper orbits of a map g is introduced and results of the following type are obtained. If a continuous self-map g of a Hausdorff topological space X has relatively compact proper orbits, then g has a fixed point. In fact, g has a common fixed point with every continuous self-map f of X which is nontrivially compatible with g. A collection of metric and semimetric space fixed point theorems follows as a consequence. Specifically, a theorem by Kirk regarding diminishing orbital diameters is generalized, and a fixed point theorem for maps with no recurrent points is proved.
Bit by Bit: The Darwinian Basis of Life
Gerald F. Joyce
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001323
Abstract: All known examples of life belong to the same biology, but there is increasing enthusiasm among astronomers, astrobiologists, and synthetic biologists that other forms of life may soon be discovered or synthesized. This enthusiasm should be tempered by the fact that the probability for life to originate is not known. As a guiding principle in parsing potential examples of alternative life, one should ask: How many heritable “bits” of information are involved, and where did they come from? A genetic system that contains more bits than the number that were required to initiate its operation might reasonably be considered a new form of life.
New and improved strategies for the treatment of gout
Natalie Dubchak, Gerald F Falasca
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S6048
Abstract: nd improved strategies for the treatment of gout Review (8779) Total Article Views Authors: Natalie Dubchak, Gerald F Falasca Published Date November 2010 Volume 2010:3 Pages 145 - 166 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJNRD.S6048 Natalie Dubchak, Gerald F Falasca Division of Rheumatology, Cooper University Hospital, UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Camden, NJ, USA Abstract: The Western world appears to be in the midst of the third great gout epidemic of all time. In this century, gout is increasing in prevalence despite an increased understanding of its risk factors and pathophysiology, and the availability of reasonably effective treatment. The main cultural factors responsible for this appear to be diet, obesity, ethanol use and medications. Excess fructose consumption is a newly recognized modifiable risk factor. The debate has been renewed concerning hyperuricemia as an independent risk factor for renal insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. Prevention is still rooted in lifestyle choices. Existing treatments have proven to be unsatisfactory in many patients with comorbidities. New treatments are available today and on the horizon for tomorrow, which offer a better quality of life for gout sufferers. These include febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase with a potentially better combination of efficacy and safety than allopurinol, and investigational inhibitors of URAT-1, an anion exchanger in the proximal tubule that is critical for uric acid homeostasis. New abortive treatments include interleukin-1 antagonists that can cut short the acute attack in 1 to 2 days in persons who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine or corticosteroids. Lastly, newer formulations of uricase have the ability to dissolve destructive tophi over weeks or months in patients who cannot use currently available hypouricemic agents. Diagnostically, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging offer advanced ways to diagnose gout noninvasively, and just as importantly, a way to follow the progress of tophus dissolution. The close association of hyperuricemia with metabolic syndrome, hypertension and renal insufficiency ensures that nephrologists will see increasing numbers of gout-afflicted patients.
New and improved strategies for the treatment of gout
Natalie Dubchak,Gerald F Falasca
International Journal of Nephrology and Renovascular Disease , 2010,
Abstract: Natalie Dubchak, Gerald F FalascaDivision of Rheumatology, Cooper University Hospital, UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at Camden, Camden, NJ, USAAbstract: The Western world appears to be in the midst of the third great gout epidemic of all time. In this century, gout is increasing in prevalence despite an increased understanding of its risk factors and pathophysiology, and the availability of reasonably effective treatment. The main cultural factors responsible for this appear to be diet, obesity, ethanol use and medications. Excess fructose consumption is a newly recognized modifiable risk factor. The debate has been renewed concerning hyperuricemia as an independent risk factor for renal insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. Prevention is still rooted in lifestyle choices. Existing treatments have proven to be unsatisfactory in many patients with comorbidities. New treatments are available today and on the horizon for tomorrow, which offer a better quality of life for gout sufferers. These include febuxostat, a nonpurine inhibitor of xanthine oxidase with a potentially better combination of efficacy and safety than allopurinol, and investigational inhibitors of URAT-1, an anion exchanger in the proximal tubule that is critical for uric acid homeostasis. New abortive treatments include interleukin-1 antagonists that can cut short the acute attack in 1 to 2 days in persons who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine or corticosteroids. Lastly, newer formulations of uricase have the ability to dissolve destructive tophi over weeks or months in patients who cannot use currently available hypouricemic agents. Diagnostically, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging offer advanced ways to diagnose gout noninvasively, and just as importantly, a way to follow the progress of tophus dissolution. The close association of hyperuricemia with metabolic syndrome, hypertension and renal insufficiency ensures that nephrologists will see increasing numbers of gout-afflicted patients.Keywords: hyperuricemia, metabolic syndrome, tophi, colchicine, febuxostat, allopurinol
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