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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 124116 matches for " Ge Wang "
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Review of "Electrical Impedance Tomography" Edited by David S. Holder
Ge Wang
BioMedical Engineering OnLine , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1475-925x-4-27
Abstract: This book consists of four parts on algorithms, hardware, applications, and directions, along with two introductory appendices on bioimpedance and biomedical EIT, respectively. The first and only chapter in the first part of the book formulates the problem and describes associated reconstruction methods. The second chapter addresses instrumentation issues, which is the only chapter in the second part. The third through seventh chapters form the third part to cover various biomedical applications, including imaging of the thorax, brain, breast, gastrointestinal tract, hyperthermia, intra-pelvic venous congestion, and so on. Finally, as the fourth part the subsequent six chapters are respectively dedicated to three unique modes of EIT (magnetic induction tomography, magnetic resonance EIT, industrial process tomography) and professional perspectives from three leading groups (Sheffield and Oxford Brookes Universities in UK as well as Rensellaer Polytechnic Institute in USA). The two appendixes are very educational for non-experts to appreciate the ideas and features of EIT. There are 141 formulas and 183 figures in the book. While generally speaking it is in high quality, the formatting and compiling work could have been done better. For example, some formulas carry no indexes; a number of figures are not given captions; full bibliographic information is not given to few cited references; and there are some minor typos.All the chapters are well written by established authorities, whose opinions on the future directions are also included. There is no doubt that the book serves its purpose well, which I read with pleasure and satisfaction. Clearly, the book provides a solid foundation to understand the big picture, technical contents and open problems of EIT and to prepare a mathematician, an engineer, or a technologist for research and development in various aspects of EIT, and a biomedical researcher or a clinician for applications of EIT techniques. Nevertheless, in
Review of "Mathematical Techniques in Multisensor Data Fusion" by David L. Hall and Sonya A. H. McMullen
Ge Wang
BioMedical Engineering OnLine , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1475-925x-4-23
Abstract: This book is written according to the Joint Directors of Laboratories (JDL) data fusion group model. There are five levels in the JDL model. The first level deals with association, correlation, estimation, and identification in the data domain. The second and third levels perform knowledge-based processing and utilize expert systems. The fourth level is focused on process monitoring and optimization. The fifth level is devoted to human computer interaction. Chapter 1 serves as an overview. Then, Chapter 2 introduces the JDL model and associated algorithms. Chapters 3–6 cover processing techniques at level one. Chapter 7 gives methods at levels two and three. Chapter 8 targets the control of sensor and information resources at level four. Chapter 9 is for data fusion at level five. Chapter 10 discusses implementation of fusion systems. Chapters 11 and 12 describe emerging applications and information management. The book contains 100 equations, 75 illustrations and key references. The typesetting quality is generally excellent but it would be better if some labels in the figures have been put in larger size. Note that the additons in this book include materials on fusion system control, DARPA's TRIP model, and applications in data warehousing, medical equipment, and defense systems.Hall (associate dean for research, Pennsylvania State University School of Information Sciences and Technology) and McMullen (captain, US Air Force) are well known experts in the field, and should be congratulated for accomplishing such an excellent job in summarizing the up-to-date essential ideas and results on multisensor fusion. Overall, the book is very informative and not difficult to read for electrical and computer engineers as well as technical managers. These types of practitioners can gain solid advice from the book regarding selection of data fusion methods, balance of trade-offs among commercial off-the-shelf tools, development of multisensor data fusion systems and their appl
Message from the Editor-in-Chief
Ge Wang
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging , 2006,
Abstract:
Message from the Editor-in-Chief
Ge Wang
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging , 2006, DOI: 10.1155/ijbi/2006/81409
Abstract:
Physical Foundation for General Interior Tomography
Ge Wang
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: Gauge invariability guarantees the same form of the Maxwell equations in different coordinate systems, and is instrumental for electromagnetic cloaking to hide a region of interest (ROI) perfectly. On the other hand, interior tomography is to reconstruct an ROI exactly. In this article, the recent results in these two disconnected areas are brought together to justify the general interior tomography principle. Several opportunities are suggested for tomographic research.
First CT-MRI Scanner for Multi-dimensional Synchrony and Multi-physical Coupling
Ge Wang
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: We propose to prototype the first CT-MRI scanner for radiation therapy and basic research, demonstrate its transformative biomedical potential, and initiate a paradigm shift in multimodality imaging. Our design consists of a double donut-shaped pair of permanent magnets to form a regionally uniform ~0.5T magnetic field and leave room for a stationary 9-source interior CT gantry at 3 tube voltages (triple-energy CT). Image reconstruction will be in a compressive sensing framework. Please discuss with Dr. Ge Wang (ge-wang@ieee.org) if you are interested in collaborative opportunities.
Cone-Beam Composite-Circling Scan and Exact Image Reconstruction for a Quasi-Short Object
Hengyong Yu,Ge Wang
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging , 2007, DOI: 10.1155/2007/87319
Abstract: Here we propose a cone-beam composite-circling mode to solve the quasi-short object problem, which is to reconstruct a short portion of a long object from longitudinally truncated cone-beam data involving the short object. In contrast to the saddle curve cone-beam scanning, the proposed scanning mode requires that the X-ray focal spot undergoes a circular motion in a plane facing the short object, while the X-ray source is rotated in the gantry main plane. Because of the symmetry of the proposed mechanical rotations and the compatibility with the physiological conditions, this new mode has significant advantages over the saddle curve from perspectives of both engineering implementation and clinical applications. As a feasibility study, a backprojection filtration (BPF) algorithm is developed to reconstruct images from data collected along a composite-circling trajectory. The initial simulation results demonstrate the correctness of the proposed exact reconstruction method and the merits of the proposed mode.
SART-Type Image Reconstruction from a Limited Number of Projections with the Sparsity Constraint
Hengyong Yu,Ge Wang
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/934847
Abstract: Based on the recent mathematical findings on solving the linear inverse problems with sparsity constraints by Daubechiesx et al., here we adapt a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) for image reconstruction from a limited number of projections subject to a sparsity constraint in terms of an invertible compression transform. The algorithm is implemented with an exemplary Haar wavelet transform and tested with a modified Shepp-Logan phantom. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the sparsity constraint helps effectively improve the quality of reconstructed images and reduce the number of necessary projections. 1. Introduction Worldwide there are growing concerns on radiation induced genetic, cancerous, and other diseases [1–3]. Computed tomography (CT) is considered as a radiation-intensive procedure, yet it becomes more and more common. In the mid-1990s, CT scans only accounted for 4% of the total X-ray procedures but they contributed 40% of the collective dose [4]. The introduction of helical, multislice, and cone-beam technologies has increased and continues the increasing usage of CT [5, 6]. In US, the number of CT examinations has been estimated as high as nearly 60 million in 2002, which account for 15% of imaging procedures and 75% of the radiation exposure [4]. In June 2007, the New York Times reported that “the per-capita dose of ionizing radiation from clinical imaging exams in the U.S. increased almost 600% from 1980 to 2006.” More recently, in a high-profile article on the rapid growth in CT use and its associated radiation risks [3], Brenner and Hall estimated that “on the basis of such risk estimates and data on CT use from 1991 through 1996, it was estimated that about 0.4% of all cancers in the United States may be attributable to the radiation from CT studies. By adjusting this estimate for current CT use, this estimate might now be in the range of 1.5 to 2.0%.” Facing the increasing radiation risk, the well-known As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle is widely accepted in the medical community. One of the practical strategies is to reduce the number of necessary projection. Very interestingly, an elegant theory of compressive sampling or compressive sensing (CS) has recently emerged which shows that high-quality signals and images can be reconstructed from far fewer measurements than what is usually considered necessary according to the Nyquist sampling theorem [7, 8]. The main idea of CS is that most signals are sparse in an appropriate orthonormal system; that is, a majority of their coefficients are
A General Formula for Fan-Beam Lambda Tomography
Hengyong Yu,Ge Wang
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging , 2006, DOI: 10.1155/ijbi/2006/10427
Abstract: Lambda tomography (LT) is to reconstruct a gradient-like image of an object only from local projection data. It is potentially an important technology for medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) at a reduced radiation dose. In this paper, we prove the first general formula for exact and efficient fan-beam LT from data collected along any smooth curve based on even and odd data extensions. As a result, an LT image can be reconstructed without involving any data extension. This implies that structures outside a scanning trajectory do not affect the exact reconstruction of points inside the trajectory even if the data may be measured through the outside features. The algorithm is simulated in a collinear coordinate system. The results support our theoretical analysis.
Role of Wnt canonical pathway in hematological malignancies
Xueling GE, Xin Wang
Journal of Hematology & Oncology , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1756-8722-3-33
Abstract: Wnt canonical signaling pathway acts a significant part in embryonic development and in maintenance of organs and tissues in adults. In the past two decades, medical scientists have devoted themselves to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of Wnt signaling. A lot of studies indicate that Wnt canonical pathway involves in the pathogenesis of a range of disease including many kinds of carcinomas. Hematological malignancies are the types of carcinoma that affect blood, bone marrow and lymph nodes. They may derive from either of the two major blood cell lineages: myeloid and lymphoid cell lines. The incidence of hematological malignancies has been increasing steadily in the world for the past years, but their etiology and pathogenesis has not been well understood involving areas of chromosome aberrations, apoptosis inhibition, abnormal activation of signaling pathways, angiogenesis, et al. In this review, we focus on the role of Wnt canonical signaling in carcinomas, especially in hematological malignancies, and then disclose potential therapeutic opportunities of this pathway in hematological malignancies.Wnt signaling pathways are categorized as "canonical "and "non-canonical" Wnt pathways, which are β-catenin-dependent and β-catenin-independent signaling pathways, respectively. Here we will emphatically point out the role of Wnt canonical pathway in hematological malignancies. A simplified model of Wnt canonical pathway is delineated in Fig. 1. Wnts is a group of secreted cysteine-rich glycoproteins, which includes at least 19 identified members in diverse species ranging from round worm and insects to human[1]. In the absence of a Wnt ligand binding to its receptor complex, the cytoplasmic β-catenin is degraded by the "destruction complex". In this complex, Axin acts as an scaffold protein, which adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and casein kinase 1α (CK1α) bind to facilitate the sequential phophorylation of β-cat
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