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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1481 matches for " Garry Walsh "
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Introductory Editorial
Garry Walsh
Clinical Medicine Reviews in Oncology , 2012,
Abstract:
Introductory Editorial
Garry Walsh
Clinical Medicine Reviews in Women's Health , 2012,
Abstract:
Introductory Editorial
Garry Walsh
Clinical Medicine Reviews in Cardiology , 2012,
Abstract:
Introductory Editorial
Garry Walsh
Clinical Medicine Reviews in Patient Care , 2012,
Abstract:
Introductory Editorial
Garry Walsh
Clinical Medicine Reviews in Vascular Health , 2012,
Abstract:
The anti-inflammatory effects of levocetirizine - are they clinically relevant or just an interesting additional effect?
Garry M Walsh
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1710-1492-5-14
Abstract: The effects of histamine are exerted through three well defined classical G protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes termed H1R, H2R, and H3R [1] and the more recently described H4R [2]. Histamine signalling through H1R is responsible for the majority of the immediate manifestations of allergic disease. Levocetirizine (Xyzal?) is the single R-isomer of the racemic mixture piperazine H1R-antagonist cetirizine dihydrochloride in a once-daily 5mg formulation. The parent compound cetirizine (Zyrtec), a once-daily 10 mg formulation, is also an effective treatment for allergic disease being the most-widely used second-generation antihistamine worldwide. Levocetirizine is a selective, potent, oral histamine H1R antagonist that is licensed in Europe as tablets and oral solution for use in adults and children over 2 years of age for the symptomatic treatment of allergic rhinitis (including persistent allergic rhinitis) and chronic idiopathic urticaria. More recently, levocetirizine tablets under the trade name Xyzal have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in adults and children over 6 years of age in the United States.Levocetirizine is a potent antihistamine as demonstrated by its ability to inhibit cutaneous histamine-induced itching and the wheal and flare reaction [3-5]. The histamine-induced wheal and flare model in human skin is a widely-used reproducible and standardized methodology that gives an objective measure of the effectiveness of antihistamines in human subjects, together with any differences in onset and duration of action. The majority of these studies found levocetirizine to be the most potent of the antihistamines tested [5], including the parent compound cetirizine [6]. Large, well designed controlled clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of levocetirizine in adults with allergic rhinitis and chronic idiopathic urticaria [7,8], while well conducted studies have demonstrated levocetirizine to be safe and effective in young
Introductory Editorial (Journal of Cell Death)
Garry M. Walsh
Journal of Cell Death , 2012,
Abstract:
Antagonism of cytokine-induced eosinophil accumulation in asthma
Garry M. Walsh
Frontiers in Pharmacology , 2012, DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00197
Abstract:
Recent Developments in Targeting Eosinophil Accumulation as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Asthma
Garry M. Walsh, Alexander J. RobinsonPing Wuin vitro
The Open Allergy Journal , 2008, DOI: 10.2174/1874838400801010035]
Abstract: Current therapies for asthma are aimed at controlling disease symptoms and for the majority of patients inhaled glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory therapy is both effective and well-tolerated. However, concerns remain about the adverse effects of glucocorticoids while a subset of asthmatic patients remains symptomatic despite optimal treatment thereby creating a clear unmet medical need. There is considerable evidence that implicates eosinophils as important effector cells and immunomodulators in the inflammation characteristic of asthma. Numerous in vitro and animal studies have demonstrated essential roles for cell adhesion molecules in eosinophil adhesion and transendothelial migration including the selectins, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 together with many of the β1 and β2 integrins. A large body of evidence has also implicated several cytokines and chemokines in the selective recruitment of eosinophils to sites of asthmatic inflammation. Biopharmaceutical approaches have been used to identify inhibitory molecules that target key elements in the processes controlling eosinophil accumulation in asthma. This review will summarise the problems and successes regarding recent developments in therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing eosinophil-mediated inflammation in the asthmatic lung.
Culture of Airway Epithelial Cells from Neonates Sampled within 48-Hours of Birth
David Miller, Steve W. Turner, Daniella Spiteri-Cornish, Neil McInnes, Alison Scaife, Peter J. Danielian, Graham Devereux, Garry M. Walsh
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0078321
Abstract: Introduction Little is known about how neonatal airway epithelial cell phenotype impacts on respiratory disease in later life. This study aimed to establish a methodology to culture and characterise neonatal nasal epithelial cells sampled from healthy, non-sedated infants within 48 hours of delivery. Methods Nasal epithelial cells were sampled by brushing both nostrils with an interdental brush, grown to confluence and sub-cultured. Cultured cells were characterised morphologically by light and electron microscopy and by immunocytochemistry. As an exemplar pro-inflammatory chemokine, IL-8 concentrations were measured in supernatants from unstimulated monolayers and after exposure to IL-1β/TNF-α or house dust mite extract. Results Primary cultures were successfully established in 135 (91%) of 149 neonatal samples seeded, with 79% (n = 117) successfully cultured to passage 3. The epithelial lineage of the cells was confirmed by morphological analysis and immunostaining. Constitutive IL-8 secretion was observed and was upregulated by IL-1β/TNF-α or house dust mite extract in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion We describe a safe, minimally invasive method of culturing nasal epithelial cells from neonates suitable for functional cell analysis offering an opportunity to study “na?ve” cells that may prove useful in elucidating the role of the epithelium in the early origins of asthma and/or allergic rhinitis.
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