oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 2 )

2019 ( 188 )

2018 ( 248 )

2017 ( 270 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 189860 matches for " G. Nuijten "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /189860
Display every page Item
Cost comparison of second-line treatment options for late stage non-small-cell lung cancer: cost analysis for Italy
Schwander B, Ravera S, Giuliani G, Nuijten M, Walzer S
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S34371
Abstract: st comparison of second-line treatment options for late stage non-small-cell lung cancer: cost analysis for Italy Original Research (1266) Total Article Views Authors: Schwander B, Ravera S, Giuliani G, Nuijten M, Walzer S Published Date September 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 237 - 243 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEOR.S34371 Received: 29 May 2012 Accepted: 19 July 2012 Published: 04 September 2012 Bjoern Schwander,1 Simona Ravera,2 Giovanni Giuliani,2 Mark Nuijten,3 Stefan Walzer1 1Assessment-in-Medicine (AiM) GmbH, Loerrach, Germany; 2Roche SpA, Monza, Italy; 3Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam (Jisp), Netherlands Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide (1.38 million cancer deaths, 18.2% of the total) and of cancer morbidity (1.61 million new cases, 12.7% of all new cancers). Currently only three second-line non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pharmacotherapies are licensed in the European Union: the chemotherapies pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. These therapy alternatives have shown a comparable efficacy (survival benefit). In the past, cost comparisons showed that erlotinib was less costly compared to docetaxel, which in turn is cheaper than pemetrexed. Nowadays erlotinib (and docetaxel) are still less expensive than pemetrexed; but docetaxel lost patent protection (basic compound patent) at the end of 2010, so docetaxel drug costs have decreased rapidly and the question remains whether erlotinib is still the least costly therapy alternative in second-line NSCLC. Material and methods: Italy was selected for base case analysis to compare the total therapy costs, estimated by combining country-specific drug costs, administration costs, and adverse event costs of erlotinib and generic docetaxel in second-line NSCLC therapy. Sensitivity analyses on central input parameters have been performed. Results: The total costs of treating one patient with erlotinib therapy of €5121 are lower than the docetaxel costs of €6699 for the Italian health care setting. Although the drug costs of erlotinib are higher than generic docetaxel (incremental €3770): the costs of intravenous chemotherapy administration (incremental -€4510), and the costs of adverse event therapy (incremental -€837) lead to higher total therapy costs for docetaxel compared to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy erlotinib. Conclusion: The cost comparison findings for Italy show that erlotinib is still the less costly therapy alternative in second-line NSCLC. These results were robust to changes of central input parameters and robust to further potential price decreases for docetaxel.
Cost comparison of second-line treatment options for late stage non-small-cell lung cancer: cost analysis for Italy
Schwander B,Ravera S,Giuliani G,Nuijten M
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research , 2012,
Abstract: Bjoern Schwander,1 Simona Ravera,2 Giovanni Giuliani,2 Mark Nuijten,3 Stefan Walzer11Assessment-in-Medicine (AiM) GmbH, Loerrach, Germany; 2Roche SpA, Monza, Italy; 3Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam (Jisp), NetherlandsBackground: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide (1.38 million cancer deaths, 18.2% of the total) and of cancer morbidity (1.61 million new cases, 12.7% of all new cancers). Currently only three second-line non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pharmacotherapies are licensed in the European Union: the chemotherapies pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. These therapy alternatives have shown a comparable efficacy (survival benefit). In the past, cost comparisons showed that erlotinib was less costly compared to docetaxel, which in turn is cheaper than pemetrexed. Nowadays erlotinib (and docetaxel) are still less expensive than pemetrexed; but docetaxel lost patent protection (basic compound patent) at the end of 2010, so docetaxel drug costs have decreased rapidly and the question remains whether erlotinib is still the least costly therapy alternative in second-line NSCLC.Material and methods: Italy was selected for base case analysis to compare the total therapy costs, estimated by combining country-specific drug costs, administration costs, and adverse event costs of erlotinib and generic docetaxel in second-line NSCLC therapy. Sensitivity analyses on central input parameters have been performed.Results: The total costs of treating one patient with erlotinib therapy of €5121 are lower than the docetaxel costs of €6699 for the Italian health care setting. Although the drug costs of erlotinib are higher than generic docetaxel (incremental €3770): the costs of intravenous chemotherapy administration (incremental -€4510), and the costs of adverse event therapy (incremental -€837) lead to higher total therapy costs for docetaxel compared to the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy erlotinib.Conclusion: The cost comparison findings for Italy show that erlotinib is still the less costly therapy alternative in second-line NSCLC. These results were robust to changes of central input parameters and robust to further potential price decreases for docetaxel.Keywords: erlotinib, docetaxel, non-small-cell lung cancer, pharmacotherapy, cost analysis, Italy
Application of PIP data in health economic models for market access
Nadine van Dongen, Mark JC Nuijten
Patient Intelligence , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PI.S15007
Abstract: pplication of PIP data in health economic models for market access Review (3968) Total Article Views Authors: Nadine van Dongen, Mark JC Nuijten Published Date November 2010 Volume 2010:2(Default) Pages 53 - 58 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PI.S15007 Nadine van Dongen1, Mark JC Nuijten2 1Van Dongen Research Ltd, London, UK; 2Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract: Cost-effectiveness data from a state of the art health economic analysis should permit reliable, reproducible, and verifiable insights into the effectiveness of a drug and the possible savings that might be achieved relative to other drugs and/or treatments. The data for a model may come from a variety of sources and are subject to varying degrees of uncertainty. The reliability of the estimates depends on the choice of the data sources. Data sources for the variables being used in a model may be clinical trials, databases, medical records, and Delphi panels. A limitation of these data sources is that they often lack the input from the patient’s perspective. Patient Intelligence applications can provide data to be used in health economic models for any given situation regarding treatment of persons suffering from a disorder, disease, or complaint. The objective of this paper to explore the opportunity of integrating patient data generated by Patient Intelligence applications as an alternative data source for a Delphi panel and databases in health economic models.
Application of PIP data in health economic models for market access
Nadine van Dongen,Mark JC Nuijten
Patient Intelligence , 2010,
Abstract: Nadine van Dongen1, Mark JC Nuijten21Van Dongen Research Ltd, London, UK; 2Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam, The NetherlandsAbstract: Cost-effectiveness data from a state of the art health economic analysis should permit reliable, reproducible, and verifiable insights into the effectiveness of a drug and the possible savings that might be achieved relative to other drugs and/or treatments. The data for a model may come from a variety of sources and are subject to varying degrees of uncertainty. The reliability of the estimates depends on the choice of the data sources. Data sources for the variables being used in a model may be clinical trials, databases, medical records, and Delphi panels. A limitation of these data sources is that they often lack the input from the patient’s perspective. Patient Intelligence applications can provide data to be used in health economic models for any given situation regarding treatment of persons suffering from a disorder, disease, or complaint. The objective of this paper to explore the opportunity of integrating patient data generated by Patient Intelligence applications as an alternative data source for a Delphi panel and databases in health economic models.Keywords: effectiveness, Patient Intelligence, data source, Delphi panel
Microeconomic Surplus in Health Care: Applied Economic Theory in Health Care in Four European Countries
S. Walzer,M. Nuijten,C. Wiesner
Frontiers in Pharmacology , 2013, DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2013.00017
Abstract: Introduction: In economic theory economic surplus refers to two related quantities: Consumer and producer surplus. Applying this theory to health care “convenience” could be one way how consumer benefits might manifest itself.
Stratified Medicine and Reimbursement Issues
Hans-Joerg Fugel,Mark Nuijten
Frontiers in Pharmacology , 2012, DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2012.00181
Abstract: Stratified Medicine (SM) has the potential to target patient populations who will most benefit from a therapy while reducing unnecessary health interventions associated with side effects. The link between clinical biomarkers/diagnostics and therapies provides new opportunities for value creation to strengthen the value proposition to pricing and reimbursement (P&R) authorities. However, the introduction of SM challenges current reimbursement schemes in many EU countries and the US as different P&R policies have been adopted for drugs and diagnostics. Also, there is a lack of a consistent process for value assessment of more complex diagnostics in these markets. New, innovative approaches and more flexible P&R systems are needed to reflect the added value of diagnostic tests and to stimulate investments in new technologies. Yet, the framework for access of diagnostic-based therapies still requires further development while setting the right incentives and appropriate align stakeholders interests when realizing long-term patient benefits. This article addresses the reimbursement challenges of SM approaches in several EU countries and the US outlining some options to overcome existing reimbursement barriers for stratified medicine.
Cost-Utility Analysis: Current Methodological Issues and Future Perspectives
Mark J. C. Nuijten,Dominique J. Dubois
Frontiers in Pharmacology , 2011, DOI: 10.3389/fphar.2011.00029
Abstract: The use of cost–effectiveness as final criterion in the reimbursement process for listing of new pharmaceuticals can be questioned from a scientific and policy point of view. There is a lack of consensus on main methodological issues and consequently we may question the appropriateness of the use of cost–effectiveness data in health care decision-making. Another concern is the appropriateness of the selection and use of an incremental cost–effectiveness threshold (Cost/QALY). In this review, we focus mainly on only some key methodological concerns relating to discounting, the utility concept, cost assessment, and modeling methodologies. Finally we will consider the relevance of some other important decision criteria, like social values and equity.
Cocaine Addiction Treatments to improve Control and reduce Harm (CATCH): New Pharmacological Treatment Options for Crack-Cocaine Dependence in the Netherlands
Mascha Nuijten, Peter Blanken, Wim van den Brink, Vincent Hendriks
BMC Psychiatry , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-244x-11-135
Abstract: The present study (Cocaine Addiction Treatments to improve Control and reduce Harm; CATCH) investigates the possibilities and problems associated with new pharmacological treatments for crack dependent patients.The CATCH-study consists of three separate randomised controlled, open-label, parallel-group feasibility trials, conducted at three separate addiction treatment institutes in the Netherlands. Patients are either new referrals or patients already in treatment. A total of 216 eligible outpatients are randomised using pre-randomisation double-consent design and receive either 12 weeks treatment with oral topiramate (n = 36; Brijder Addiction Treatment, The Hague), oral modafinil (n = 36; Arkin, Amsterdam), or oral dexamphetamine sustained-release (n = 36; Bouman GGZ, Rotterdam) as an add-on to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), or receive a 12-week CBT only (controls: n = 3 × 36).Primary outcome in these feasibility trials is retention in the underlying psychosocial treatment (CBT). Secondary outcomes are acceptance and compliance with the study medication, safety, changes in cocaine (and other drug) use, physical and mental health, social functioning, and patient satisfaction.To date, the CATCH-study is the first study in the Netherlands that explores new treatment options for crack-cocaine dependence focusing on both abstinence and harm minimisation. It is expected that the study will contribute to the development of new treatments for one of the most problematic substance use disorders.The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR2576The European Union Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials EudraCT2009-010584-16Cocaine, particularly in its base form ('crack'), has become one of the drugs of most concern in many countries, being associated with a wide range of medical, psychiatric and social problems for the individual, and with significant public order consequences for society [1-3]. In the Netherlands (16.7 million inhabitants), annual cocaine-related a
Processes Underpinning Development and Maintenance of Diversity in Rice in West Africa: Evidence from Combining Morphological and Molecular Markers
Alfred Mokuwa, Edwin Nuijten, Florent Okry, Béla Teeken, Harro Maat, Paul Richards, Paul C. Struik
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085953
Abstract: We assessed the interplay of artificial and natural selection in rice adaptation in low-input farming systems in West Africa. Using 20 morphological traits and 176 molecular markers, 182 farmer varieties of rice (Oryza spp.) from 6 West African countries were characterized. Principal component analysis showed that the four botanical groups (Oryza sativa ssp. indica, O. sativa ssp. japonica, O. glaberrima, and interspecific farmer hybrids) exhibited different patterns of morphological diversity. Regarding O. glaberrima, morphological and molecular data were in greater conformity than for the other botanical groups. A clear difference in morphological features was observed between O. glaberrima rices from the Togo hills and those from the Upper Guinea Coast, and among O. glaberrima rices from the Upper Guinea Coast. For the other three groups such clear patterns were not observed. We argue that this is because genetic diversity is shaped by different environmental and socio-cultural selection pressures. For O. glaberrima, recent socio-cultural selection pressures seemed to restrict genetic diversity while this was not observed for the other botanical groups. We also show that O. glaberrima still plays an important role in the selection practices of farmers and resulting variety development pathways. This is particularly apparent in the case of interspecific farmer hybrids where a relationship was found between pericarp colour, panicle attitude and genetic diversity. Farmer varieties are the product of long and complex trajectories of selection governed by local human agency. In effect, rice varieties have emerged that are adapted to West African farming conditions through genotype × environment × society interactions. The diversity farmers maintain in their rice varieties is understood to be part of a risk-spreading strategy that also facilitates successful and often serendipitous variety innovations. We advocate, therefore, that farmers and farmer varieties should be more effectively involved in crop development.
Robustness and Strategies of Adaptation among Farmer Varieties of African Rice (Oryza glaberrima) and Asian Rice (Oryza sativa) across West Africa
Alfred Mokuwa, Edwin Nuijten, Florent Okry, Béla Teeken, Harro Maat, Paul Richards, Paul C. Struik
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034801
Abstract: This study offers evidence of the robustness of farmer rice varieties (Oryza glaberrima and O. sativa) in West Africa. Our experiments in five West African countries showed that farmer varieties were tolerant of sub-optimal conditions, but employed a range of strategies to cope with stress. Varieties belonging to the species Oryza glaberrima – solely the product of farmer agency – were the most successful in adapting to a range of adverse conditions. Some of the farmer selections from within the indica and japonica subspecies of O. sativa also performed well in a range of conditions, but other farmer selections from within these two subspecies were mainly limited to more specific niches. The results contradict the rather common belief that farmer varieties are only of local value. Farmer varieties should be considered by breeding programmes and used (alongside improved varieties) in dissemination projects for rural food security.
Page 1 /189860
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.