oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 4 )

2018 ( 25 )

2017 ( 16 )

2016 ( 17 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 9924 matches for " Frank Baiden "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /9924
Display every page Item
Demographic Surveillance Sites and emerging challenges in international health
Baiden Frank,Hodgson Abraham,Binka Fred N
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006,
Abstract:
Duodenal perforation in a 12-month old child with severe malaria
Nina Goldman, Damien Punguyire, Kingsley Osei-Kwakye, Frank Baiden
Pan African Medical Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) in children remains rare and difficult to diagnose before the onset of complications. We report on a case of a 12-month child with perforated duodenal ulcer, association with malaria. The severity of the febrile presentation and the positive laboratory confirmation of malaria delayed the diagnosis of PUD. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. An awareness of the possibility, and a lower threshold for considering PUD in children may help prevent complications. Pan African Medical Journal 2012; 12:1
Acceptability of Rapid Diagnostic Test-Based Management of Malaria among Caregivers of Under-Five Children in Rural Ghana
Frank Baiden, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Eunice Okyere, Mathilda Tivura, George Adjei, Daniel Chandramohan, Jayne Webster
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045556
Abstract: Introduction WHO now recommends test-based management of malaria (TBMM) across all age-groups. This implies artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) should be restricted to rapid diagnostic test (RDT)-positive cases. This is a departure from what caregivers in rural communities have been used to for many years. Methods We conducted a survey among caregivers living close to 32 health centres in six districts in rural Ghana and used logistic regression to explore factors likely to influence caregiver acceptability of RDT based case management and concern about the denial of ACT on account of negative RDT results. Focus group discussions were conducted to explain the quantitative findings and to elicit further factors. Results A total of 3047 caregivers were interviewed. Nearly all (98%) reported a preference for TBMM over presumptive treatment. Caregivers who preferred TBMM were less likely to be concerned about the denial of ACT to their test-negative children (O.R. 0.57, 95%C.I. 0.33–0.98). Compared with caregivers who had never secured national health insurance cover, caregivers who had valid (adjusted O.R. 1.30, 95% CI 1.07–1.61) or expired (adjusted O.R. 1.38, 95% CI 1.12–1.73) insurance cover were more likely to be concerned about the denial of ACT to their RDT-negative children. Major factors that promote TBMM acceptability include the perception that a blood test at health centre level represents improvement in the quality of care, leads to improvement in treatment outcomes, and offers opportunity for better communication between health workers and caregivers. Acceptability is also enhanced by engaging caregivers in the procedures of the test. Apprehensions about negative health worker attitude could however undermine acceptance. Conclusion Test (RDT)-based management of malaria in under-five children is likely to be acceptable to caregivers in rural Ghana. The quality of caregiver-health worker interaction needs to be improved if acceptability is to be sustained.
Evaluation of Food Hygiene Knowledge Attitudes and Practices of Food Handlers in Food Businesses in Accra, Ghana  [PDF]
George Amponsah Annor, Ekua Anamoaba Baiden
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2011.28114
Abstract: Food handlers have a prime role to play in food businesses, and that is to guarantee that meals served are hygienic for consumption. Conscious or inadvertent contamination of such food places consumers at risk of suffering from food- borne illnesses. For this reason the study was carried out to document the food hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practices of some food handlers, in food businesses in Accra, Ghana and also to determine the microbiological load of the foods sold by the food businesses. The study targeted food handlers in the hotel industry. The study involved a field survey, followed by a laboratory assessment of microbiological status of food samples obtained from the sampled hotels. Cross tabulations and chi – squared tests (5% significance level) as well as frequency distributions were used to analyze the data obtained from the field survey. Data obtained from the laboratory assessment were also compared to standard values of microbiological counts. Majority of respondents were between the ages of 30 - 40 years (42.9%) with tertiary or post secondary education. Food hygiene knowledge and attitudes were satisfactory, however its practice was challenging. Gender, age and educational level of respondents did not influence their food hygiene practices. Microbial counts of all food samples was generally high ranging from 1.2 × 105 CFU/g to 1.1 × 108 CFU /g. The total coliform counts of foods ranged from 1.0 × 104 CFU/g to 5.0 × 106 CFU/g, and these were obtained from three out of the five hotel kitchens sampled. The study concluded that, the food hygiene knowledge and attitudes of the food handlers did not result in efficient food hygiene practices.
An assessment of the likely acceptability of vaginal microbicides for HIV prevention among women in rural Ghana
Martha A Abdulai, Frank Baiden, George Adjei, Samuel Afari-Asiedu, Kwame Adjei, Charlotte Tawiah, Sam Newton
BMC Women's Health , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6874-12-40
Abstract: The study employs a mixed method design, using cross-sectional survey and focus group discussions to further understand issues related to awareness and attitudes towards microbicide development, acceptability and perceived partner attitudes among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in two health facilities in the Kintampo North municipality of Ghana. We used logistic regression to identify possible predictors of microbicide acceptability among the women surveyed.Although only 2% of the 504 women were aware of the development of microbicides, 95% were willing to use one when it became available. The cost of a microbicide that will be considered affordable to 50% of women was US$0.75. Although there were concerns about possible wetting effect, gel or creams were the most preferred (68% of women) formulation. Although 71% thought their partners will find microbicide acceptable, apprehensions about the feasibility of and consequences of failed discreet use were evident. 49% of women were concerned about possible negative effect of microbicide on sexual pleasure. Perceived partner acceptability (O.R. =17.7; 95%C.I. 5.03-62.5) and possibility of discreet use (O.R. =8.9 95%C.I. 2.63-30.13) were the important predictors of microbicide acceptability.Achieving microbicide acceptability among male partners should be made a part of the promotive interventions for ensuring effective use among women in rural Ghana.According to the 2010 UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic, 33.3 million people live with HIV and 1.8 million deaths due to AIDS occurred in 2009. The total number of new infections in 2009 was 2.6 million. Sub-Saharan Africa remains the hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support in this part of the world remains a major priority in global health [1,2].Heterosexual transmission accounts for more than 80% of all new HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa [3]. Traditional HIV preventive methods such as condom us
Factors influencing condom use among women in Ghana: an HIV/AIDS perspective
P Baiden, F Rajulton
SAHARA J (Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance) , 2011,
Abstract: Although in Ghana information on HIV infection and prevention, both in terms of quality and quantity, has increased considerably within the past few years, available literature indicates that behaviour change is yet to correspond with the amount of information and education provided. The objective of this study is to examine factors that influence condom use among women in Ghana in the context of HIV/AIDS prevalence. Data for this study are from the 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (GDHS) and the study population (N=5 691) was analysed using logistic regression with the Health Belief Model (HBM) as an explanatory tool. The outcome variable for this study is condom use during last sexual intercourse. The HBM identifies perception of HIV/AIDS risks, awareness of its seriousness, knowledge about prevention, and confidence in condom use as predictors of safe sexual activity. Results show that the proportion of women reporting use of condoms remains tremendously low, in both the rural and urban areas. In the urban areas, only 15% of women reported having sex with condom during their last intercourse, whereas in the rural areas the proportion is even lower (10%). However, multivariate analyses based on the HBM components show that speaking with a partner about how to avoid AIDS (Odds Ratio = 1.63) and perceived benefits of using condoms (Odds Ratio = 1.54) are notable factors that predict condom use. Overall, the study points out that with the exception of perceived severity, the HBM can be applied to understand condom use among the study population. It will be important to emphasise all components of the HBM and empower women with condom negotiation skills.
An Evaluation of the Clinical Assessments of Under-Five Febrile Children Presenting to Primary Health Facilities in Rural Ghana
Frank Baiden, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Justina Bawah, Jane Bruce, Mathilda Tivura, Rupert Delmini, Stephaney Gyaase, Seeba Amenga-Etego, Daniel Chandramohan, Jayne Webster
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0028944
Abstract: Background The shift to test-based management of malaria represents an important departure from established practice under the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI). The possibility of false results of tests for malaria and co-morbidity, however, make it important that guidelines in IMCI case assessment are still followed. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional observational study to evaluate current practices in IMCI-based assessment of febrile children in 10 health centres and 5 district hospitals, with follow up of a subset of children to determine day 7–10 post-treatment clinical outcome. Clinical consultation, examination and prescribing practices were recorded using a checklist by trained non-medical observers. The facility case management of 1,983 under-five years old febrile children was observed and 593 followed up at home on days 5–10. The mean number of tasks performed from the 11 tasks expected to be done by the IMCI guidelines was 6 (SD 1.6). More than 6 tasks were performed in only 35% of children and this varied substantially between health facilities (range 3–85%). All 11 tasks were performed in only 1% of children. The most commonly performed tasks were temperature measurement (91%) and weighing (88%). Respiratory rate was checked in only 4% of children presenting with cough or difficulty in breathing. The likelihood of performing “better than average number of tasks” (>6) was higher when the consultation was done by medical assistants than doctors (O.R. = 3.16, 1.02–9.20). The number of tasks performed during assessment did not, however, influence clinical outcome (O.R. = 1.02, 0.83–1.24). Conclusion Facility-tailored interventions are needed to improve adherence to IMCI guidelines incorporating test-based management of malaria. Studies are needed to re-evaluate the continued validity of tasks defined in IMCI case assessment guidelines.
Family Planning Awareness, Perceptions and Practice among Community Members in the Kintampo Districts of Ghana  [PDF]
Obed Ernest A. Nettey, Yeetey A. Enuameh, Emmanuel Mahama, Abubakari Sulemana, George Adjei, Stephaney Gyaase, Samuel Afari-Asiedu, Robert Adda, Abena Konadu Yawson, Gifty Fosuaa Nuamah, Edward Apraku Anane, Livesy Abokyi, Charles Zandoh, Martha Abdulai, Ellen Abrafi Boamah, Kwame Adjei, Seeba Amenga-Etego, Francis Dzabeng, Charlotte Tawiah-Agyeman, Frank Baiden, Kwaku Poku Asante, Seth Owusu-Agyei
Advances in Reproductive Sciences (ARSci) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/arsci.2015.31001
Abstract: Family planning is known to prevent maternal deaths, but some social norms, limited supplies and inconsistent use makes this difficult to achieve in most low- and middle-income countries. In spite of the high fertility levels in most sub-Saharan African countries and the potential economic benefits of family planning, its patronage remains very low in the sub-region. This study was with the objective of identifying the levels of awareness, utilization, access to and perceptions about family planning and contraception. A cross-sectional study design was used for the study, with data collected from multiple sources using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Relevant findings included a marked disconnect between family planning/contraceptive knowledge and use. The pills and injectables were the most frequently used, but females in the study population poorly patronised emergency contraception. Supplies of most family planning methods were found to be health facility based, requiring clients to have to necessarily go there for services. Some respondents harboured perceptions that family planning was the responsibility of females alone and that it fuelled promiscuity among female users. Recommendations made include ensuring that health facilities had adequate staff and expertise to provide facility-based family planning services and also to disabuse the minds of community members of the negative perceptions towards family planning.
Accuracy of Rapid Tests for Malaria and Treatment Outcomes for Malaria and Non-Malaria Cases among Under-Five Children in Rural Ghana
Frank Baiden, Jayne Webster, Mathilda Tivura, Rupert Delimini, Yvonne Berko, Seeba Amenga-Etego, Akua Agyeman-Budu, Akosua B. Karikari, Jane Bruce, Seth Owusu-Agyei, Daniel Chandramohan
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0034073
Abstract: Background WHO now recommends test-based management of malaria across all transmission settings. The accuracy of rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and the outcome of treatment based on the result of tests will influence acceptability of and adherence to the new guidelines. Method We conducted a study at the Kintampo hospital in rural Ghana to evaluate the performance of CareStart, a HRP-2 based RDT, using microscopy as reference. We applied IMCI treatment guidelines, restricted ACT to RDT-positive children and followed-up both RDT-positive (malaria) and RDT-negative (non-malaria) cases over 28 days. Results 436 children were enrolled in the RDT evaluation and 391 (children with haemoglobin >8.0 gm/dl) were followed-up to assess treatment outcomes. Mean age was 25.4 months (s.d. 14.6). Sensitivity and specificity of the RDT were 100.0% and 73.0% respectively. Over the follow-up period, 32 (18.5%) RDT-negative children converted to positive, with 7 (4.0%) of them presenting with fever. More children in the non-malaria group made unscheduled visits than children in the malaria group (13.3% versus 7.7%) On all scheduled follow-up visits, proportion of children having a temperature higher than that recorded on day 0 was higher in the non-malaria group compared to the malaria group. Reports of unfavourable treatment outcomes by caregivers were higher among the non-malaria group than the malaria group. Conclusions The RDT had good sensitivity and specificity. However a minority of children who will not receive ACT based on RDT results may develop clinical malaria within a short period in high transmission settings. This could undermine caregivers' and health workers' confidence in the new guidelines. Improving the quality of management of non-malarial febrile illnesses should be a priority in the era of test-based management of malaria. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00832754
Housing and Health in Ghana: The Psychosocial Impacts of Renting a Home
Isaac Luginaah,Godwin Arku,Philip Baiden
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph7020528
Abstract: This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study investigating the impacts of renting a home on the psychosocial health of tenants in the Accra Metropolitan Area (AMA) in Ghana. In-depth interviews (n = 33) were conducted with private renters in Adabraka, Accra. The findings show that private renters in the AMA face serious problems in finding appropriate and affordable rental units, as well as a persistent threat of eviction by homeowners. These challenges tend to predispose renters to psychosocial distress and diminishing ontological security. Findings are relevant to a range of pluralistic policy options that emphasize both formal and informal housing provision, together with the reorganization and decentralization of the Rent Control Board to the district level to facilitate easy access by the citizenry.
Page 1 /9924
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.