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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 144476 matches for " F Okonofua "
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Female genital mutilation and reproductive health in Africa
F Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2006,
Abstract: Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) or the more value neutral term, Female Genital Cutting (FGC) is widely practised in northern Sudan, where around 90% of women undergo the most extensive form of FGC, infibulation. One new approach to combating FGC in Sudan is to acknowledge the previously hidden form of FGC, reinfibulation (RI) after delivery, when the woman is sewn back so much as to mimic virginity. Based on a qualitative study in Khartoum State, this article explores Sudanese women\'s and men\'s perceptions and experiences of FGC with emphasis on RI after delivery. The results showed that both genders blame each other for the continuation of the practices, and the comprehensive understanding of the perceptions and experiences was that both the women and the men in this study were victims of the consequences of FGC and RI. The female narratives could be understood in the three categories: viewing oneself as being “normal” in having undergone FGC and RI; being caught between different perspectives; and having limited influence on the practices of FGC and RI. The male narratives could be understood in the three categories: suffering from the consequences of FGC and RI, trying to counterbalance the negative sexual effects of FGC and striving in vain to change female traditions. The results indicate that the complexity of the persistence of FGC and RI goes far beyond being explained by subconscious patriarchal and maternalistic actions, related to socially constructed concepts of normality, female identity, tradition and religion in a “silent” culture between men and women. African Journal of Reproductive Health Vol. 10 (2) 2006: pp. 10-12
Same sex relationships and HIV/AIDS in Africa: Need for Research and programmatic focus
F Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2012,
Abstract:
Editorial - Promoting Youth Sexual and Reproductive Health in Africa: The Need for a Paradigm Shift
F Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2012,
Abstract: No
Editorial: Women's Health – A Continuing Challenge in Developing Countries
F Okonofua
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research , 2007,
Abstract: No > Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research Vol. 6 (3) 2007: pp. 735-736
Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention: Evidence and Expectation
L Edouard, F Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2006,
Abstract: Along with governments from around the world, African leaders agreed at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in 1994 to address unsafe abortion as a major public health problem. At the five-year review of the ICPD, they decided further that health systems should make safe abortion services accessible for legal indications. Based on this mandate, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed norms and standards for quality abortion services, Safe Abortion: Technical and Policy Guidance for Health Systems, released in 2003. While abortion-related maternal mortality and morbidity remains very high in many African countries, stakeholders are increasingly using WHO recommendations in conjunction with other global and regional policy frameworks, including the African Union Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa, to spur new action to address this persistent problem. Efforts include: reforming national laws and policies; preparing service-delivery guidelines and regulations; strengthening training programs; and expanding community outreach programs. This paper reviews progress and lessons learned while drawing attention to the fragility of the progress made thus far and the key challenges that remain in ensuring access to safe abortion care for all African women. African Journal of Reproductive Health Vol. 10 (2) 2006: pp. 7-12
Prevention of Breast Cancer in African women
F Okonofua, P Iribhogbe
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2006,
Abstract:
Editorial Prioritizing the prevention of HIV/AIDS in African women: A call for action
Friday Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2012,
Abstract: Click on the link to view the abstract. African Journal of Reproductive Health September 2012; 16(3): 9
Time for Action: Audit, Accountability and Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in Nigeria
Julia Hussein, Friday Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2012,
Abstract: Improving the quality of care is essential for achieving reductions in maternal mortality. Audit is one of the methods which can be used to simultaneously assess as well as improve quality. This commentary discusses one type of audit – confidential enquiries into maternal death. We believe that the enthusiasm for establishing a confidential enquiry system in Nigeria is growing. The challenges faced in setting up an audit system are discussed and 6 steps are proposed to locate the conduct of a confidential enquiry as part of a set of activities which will take cognizance of existing know-how, create shared ownership and provide a coherent picture of needs and information gaps in the provision of quality maternity services. Having such a system in place can be a route towards achieving a progressive vision of accountability for the reduction of maternal mortality in Nigeria.
The Prevalence of Dual Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Hepatitis C Virus (HIV/HCV) Infection in Asymptomatic Pregnant Women in Benin City, Nigeria
JUE Onakewhor, FE Okonofua
African Journal of Reproductive Health , 2009,
Abstract: Concerted efforts have been made to combat HIV infection in Nigerian. By contrast, much less attention has been paid to hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection. These viruses have similar immuno-epidemiology. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV/HIV dual infection among 269 antenatal attendees at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in southern Nigeria. The study was prospective and cross-sectional and consisted of the analysis of the sera of the participants for anti-HCV and HIV antibodies using ELISA. The result showed that 1.86% samples were HCV antibodies positive while 8.30% were seropositive for HIV-1 antibodies. There were no cases of dual infections. The HIV positive women and their babies had antiretroviral therapy. We conclude that dual HCV/HIV infection in pregnancy in Nigeria may be uncommon but suggest multicenter studies to determine the national prevalence while initiating strategies for their prevention (Afr J Reprod Health 2009; 13[2]:97-108).
Seroprevalence of hepatitis c viral antidodies in pregnancy in a tertiary health facility in Nigeria
JUE Onakewhor, FE Okonofua
Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice , 2009,
Abstract:
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