oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 6 of 6 matches for " Erbagci ? "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /6
Display every page Item
Ocular anterior segment pathologies and tear film changes in patients with psoriasis vulgaris.
Erbagci I,Erbagci Z,Gungor K,Bekir N
Acta Medica Okayama , 2003,
Abstract: Ocular manifestations in patients with psoriasis vulgaris have been investigated in only a small number of studies. Our purpose was to identify tear film function and ocular pathologies associated with psoriasis vulgaris in patients who had received neither oral retinoids nor phototherapy. We examined 62 eyes of 31 patients with psoriasis and 60 eyes of 30 age-and-sex matched healthy volunteers. In addition to complete ocular and dermatological examination, tear film function (i.e., tear secretion and tear film stability) were assessed by the Schirmer-I test, as well as by tear film break-up time. None of the controls had any ocular abnormalities, whereas 67.74% of patients with psoriasis had various anterior segment pathologies (P<0.00009). The most prevalent finding was chronic blepharoconjunctivitis (64.5%), as the only pathology (n=9) or in association with other findings, including nonspecific corneal opacities (n=4), cataract (n=3), both corneal opacities and cataract (n=2), and corneal pigment dispersion (n=2). The Schirmer-I test results revealed comparable mean values in the patient group (9.8+-4.2 mm) and in the controls (11.2+-3.7 mm; P=0.078). However, mean tear film break-up time was significantly shorter in the patients (7.2+-2.5 sec) than in the healthy persons (11.7+-3.1 sec; P=0.001). In agreement with some previous reports, our findings clearly demonstrated that early ocular involvement occurs in patients with psoriasis vulgaris, irrespective of the history of previous therapeutic modalities (e.g., retinoid therapy and phototherapy). Thus, the present findings are suggestive of the contributory role of primary etiologic factors of psoriasis in the pathogenesis of ocular changes in patients with psoriasis vulgaris.
Botulinum toxin injections for blepharospasm prior to ocular surgeries
Okumus S,Coskun E,Erbagci,Tatar MG
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012,
Abstract: Seydi Okumus1, Erol Coskun1, brahim Erbagci1, M Gürkan Tatar2, Aysegul Comez1, Erdal Kaydu1, Ramazan Yayuspayi1, Bulent Gurler11Department of Ophthalmology, University of Gaziantep, 2Ophthalmology Clinic, Nizip State Hospital, Nizip, Gaziantep, TurkeyPurpose: The aim of this study was to show the efficiency of preoperative botulinum toxin A (Botox A) in patients with benign essential blepharospasm who were to undergo ocular surgery with local anesthesia.Materials and methods: Twenty-eight benign essential blepharospasm patients who were administered unilateral Botox A prior to ocular surgery between January 2004 and May 2011 were included in this study. Eleven cases had pterygiums, ten had cataracts, and four had glaucomas, while the remaining three had aphakia. All cases’ severity of spasm (stage 0–4) and eyelid closing forces (stage 1–4) were evaluated according to the Jankovic scale prior to the injection, at 3 days, 14 days, 1 month, and 3 months after Botox A injection.Results: Of the patients enrolled in the study, 16 were female and 12 were male, with an average age of 55.52 ± 1.53 years (52–65). Average onset of the Botox injection's effect was 2.8 ± 0.9 (2–5) days. Its effect lingered for about 11.5 ± 3.6 (8–22) weeks. The severity of spasm and eyelid closing forces of all the patients enrolled were compared prior to the injection at 3 and 14 days and the first and third months after the injection. There were statistically significant differences between prior to the injection and 3 days (P = 0.001), 14 days (P < 0.001) and 1 month after the injection (P <0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between prior to the injection and 3 months after the injection (P = 0.513). Fourteen days following the injection, the surgeries were successfully performed.Conclusion: Botox A administered prior to ocular surgery will control both blepharospasm and lower the risks that can be encountered before and during surgery, thus increasing the comfort of the patient and the surgeon.Keywords: botulinum toxin A, blepharospasm, ocular surgery
Histopathological effects of maternal hair dye use on the cornea
H Erbagci, I Erbagci, I Sari, C Bagci, O Saygili, E Gumusburun, M Ozaslan
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2010,
Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate and compare the histopathological effects of hair dye additives, 2- amino-5-nitrophenol (2A5NP) and 2-nitro-p-phenylendiamin (2NPPD) on cornea of neonates from pregnant rats that have been administered these additives subcutaneously. The study included 90 neonates of 26 nulligravida wistar-albino rats among which ten were given 100 mg/kg/day 2A5NP (Group I), ten rats received 150 mg/kg/day 2NPPD (Group II) and control rats received saline (Group III) injections subcutaneously between 7th and 15th gestational days. No sign of toxicity was observed during the treatment and there was no gross abnormality in both the study and control groups. Histopathological changes of cornea were seen in 22 of 30 newborn rats in Group I (73.4%), in 23 of 30 rats in Group II (76.7%) and only 5 of 30 rats in the control saline injected Group III (16.7%). Histopathological effect of the two additives were statistically significant when compared to the control group (Chi-square:27.63, p = 0.0001), but there was no difference between the effects of 2A5NP and 2NPPD additives on cornea (Chisquare: 0.089, p = 0.766). The present experimental study on rats confirmed the histopathological effect of 2A5NP and 2NPPD on cornea beyond doubt. In the light of which, we can speculate that maternal exposure of hair dyes during pregnancy has some teratogenic effects on newborn rat cornea.
Ketamine versus propofol for strabismus surgery in children
Ayse Mizrak, Ibrahim Erbagci, Tulin Arici, et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S11336
Abstract: amine versus propofol for strabismus surgery in children Original Research (4057) Total Article Views Authors: Ayse Mizrak, Ibrahim Erbagci, Tulin Arici, et al Published Date July 2010 Volume 2010:4 Pages 673 - 679 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S11336 Ayse Mizrak1, Ibrahim Erbagci2, Tulin Arici1, Ibrahim Ozcan1, Gurkan Tatar2, Unsal Oner1 1Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2The Department of Ophthalmology, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey Purpose: To compare the effects of intravenous infusion of ketamine and propofol anesthesia in children undergoing strabismus surgery. Methods: Sixty pediatric patients aged 4–11 years were enrolled for the study. Patients in Group K were infused ketamine 1–3 mg/kg/hr (n = 30) and patients in Group P were infused with propofol 6–9 mg/kg/hr (n = 30). After giving fentanyl 1 μg/kg and rocuronium bromide 0.5 mg/kg, patients were intubated. Results: The consumption of anesthetics (P = 0.0001) and antiemetics (P = 0.004), the incidence of -oculocardiac reflex (P = 0.02) in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The recovery time (P = 0.008), postoperative agitation score (P = 0.005), Face Pain Scale (P = 0.001), Ramsay Sedation Score (P = 0.01) during awakening and at postoperative 30th min (P = 0.02) in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The postoperative agitation score -during awakening was significantly lower than the preoperative values in Group K (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: The infusion of ketamine is more advantageous than the infusion of propofol in children for use in strabismus surgery.
Ketamine versus propofol for strabismus surgery in children
Ayse Mizrak,Ibrahim Erbagci,Tulin Arici,et al
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2010,
Abstract: Ayse Mizrak1, Ibrahim Erbagci2, Tulin Arici1, Ibrahim Ozcan1, Gurkan Tatar2, Unsal Oner11Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, Turkey; 2The Department of Ophthalmology, Gaziantep University School of Medicine, Gaziantep, TurkeyPurpose: To compare the effects of intravenous infusion of ketamine and propofol anesthesia in children undergoing strabismus surgery. Methods: Sixty pediatric patients aged 4–11 years were enrolled for the study. Patients in Group K were infused ketamine 1–3 mg/kg/hr (n = 30) and patients in Group P were infused with propofol6–9 mg/kg/hr (n = 30). After giving fentanyl 1 μg/kg and rocuronium bromide 0.5 mg/kg, patients were intubated.Results: The consumption of anesthetics (P = 0.0001) and antiemetics (P = 0.004), the incidence of -oculocardiac reflex (P = 0.02) in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The recovery time (P = 0.008), postoperative agitation score (P = 0.005), Face Pain Scale (P = 0.001), Ramsay Sedation Score (P = 0.01) during awakening and at postoperative 30th min (P = 0.02) in Group K were significantly lower than in Group P. The postoperative agitation score -during awakening was significantly lower than the preoperative values in Group K (P = 0.0001).Conclusions: The infusion of ketamine is more advantageous than the infusion of propofol in children for use in strabismus surgery.Keywords: ketamine, propofol, pediatrics, strabismus, surgery
Botulinum toxin injections for blepharospasm prior to ocular surgeries
Okumus S, Coskun E, Erbagci , Tatar MG, Comez A, Kaydu E, Yayuspayi R, Gurler B
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S30277
Abstract: otulinum toxin injections for blepharospasm prior to ocular surgeries Original Research (2387) Total Article Views Authors: Okumus S, Coskun E, Erbagci , Tatar MG, Comez A, Kaydu E, Yayuspayi R, Gurler B Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 579 - 583 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S30277 Received: 27 January 2012 Accepted: 12 March 2012 Published: 03 May 2012 Seydi Okumus1, Erol Coskun1, brahim Erbagci1, M Gürkan Tatar2, Aysegul Comez1, Erdal Kaydu1, Ramazan Yayuspayi1, Bulent Gurler1 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of Gaziantep, 2Ophthalmology Clinic, Nizip State Hospital, Nizip, Gaziantep, Turkey Purpose: The aim of this study was to show the efficiency of preoperative botulinum toxin A (Botox A) in patients with benign essential blepharospasm who were to undergo ocular surgery with local anesthesia. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight benign essential blepharospasm patients who were administered unilateral Botox A prior to ocular surgery between January 2004 and May 2011 were included in this study. Eleven cases had pterygiums, ten had cataracts, and four had glaucomas, while the remaining three had aphakia. All cases’ severity of spasm (stage 0–4) and eyelid closing forces (stage 1–4) were evaluated according to the Jankovic scale prior to the injection, at 3 days, 14 days, 1 month, and 3 months after Botox A injection. Results: Of the patients enrolled in the study, 16 were female and 12 were male, with an average age of 55.52 ± 1.53 years (52–65). Average onset of the Botox injection's effect was 2.8 ± 0.9 (2–5) days. Its effect lingered for about 11.5 ± 3.6 (8–22) weeks. The severity of spasm and eyelid closing forces of all the patients enrolled were compared prior to the injection at 3 and 14 days and the first and third months after the injection. There were statistically significant differences between prior to the injection and 3 days (P = 0.001), 14 days (P < 0.001) and 1 month after the injection (P <0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between prior to the injection and 3 months after the injection (P = 0.513). Fourteen days following the injection, the surgeries were successfully performed. Conclusion: Botox A administered prior to ocular surgery will control both blepharospasm and lower the risks that can be encountered before and during surgery, thus increasing the comfort of the patient and the surgeon.
Page 1 /6
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.