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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 8659 matches for " Elizabeth Whitefield "
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Comparison of Raw Dairy Manure Slurry and Anaerobically Digested Slurry as N Sources for Grass Forage Production
Olivia E. Saunders,Ann-Marie Fortuna,Joe H. Harrison,Elizabeth Whitefield,Craig G. Cogger,Ann C. Kennedy,Andy I. Bary
International Journal of Agronomy , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/101074
Abstract: We conducted a 3-year field study to determine how raw dairy slurry and anaerobically digested slurry (dairy slurry and food waste) applied via broadcast and subsurface deposition to reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) affected forage biomass, N uptake, apparent nitrogen recovery (ANR), and soil nitrate concentrations relative to urea. Annual N applications ranged from 600?kg?N?ha?1 in 2009 to 300?kg?N?ha?1 in 2011. Forage yield and N uptake were similar across slurry treatments. Soil nitrate concentrations were greatest at the beginning of the fall leaching season, and did not differ among slurry treatments or application methods. Urea-fertilized plots had the highest soil nitrate concentrations but did not consistently have greatest forage biomass. ANR for the slurry treatments ranged from 35 to 70% when calculations were based on ammonium-N concentration, compared with 31 to 65% for urea. Slurry ANR calculated on a total N basis was lower (15 to 40%) due to lower availability of the organic N in the slurries. No consistent differences in soil microbial biomass or other biological indicators were observed. Anaerobically digested slurry supported equal forage production and similar N use efficiency when compared to raw dairy slurry. 1. Introduction There is a need for a set of best management practices that addresses how to utilize the growing quantity of reactive nitrogen (N) produced by livestock operations. Animal agriculture in the United States has become more specialized with farms consolidating and growing in size [1]. The number of dairy farms has decreased by 94% since 1960, but the number of animals has remained constant [2]. Animal consolidation has created challenges with respect to on-farm N surplus, waste management and nutrient loading in the environment [3, 4]. Annually in the United States, more than 5800?Mg of manure N is produced [5]. One approach to ameliorate negative environmental impacts associated with animal manures is through adoption of anaerobic digestion technologies to treat farm-generated manures and food processing wastes [6–9]. Digestion of wastes can provide a stable and consistent source of nutrients comparable to inorganic fertilizers such as urea. Anaerobic digestion converts organic carbon into methane used to generate electricity, and it also converts organic N to plant available ammonium ( ), increasing the ratio of /total N in the effluent [10]. Carbon is removed during both the methane production and fiber removal processes, resulting in a smaller C?:?N ratio of the effluent [11]. Therefore, digested
Ethically we can no longer sit on the fence - a neuropsychological perspective on the cerebrally hazardous contact sports
AB Shuttleworth-Edwards, VJ Whitefield
South African Journal of Sports Medicine , 2007,
Abstract: Background and objective. The number of male and female contact sport participants is increasing worldwide. The aim of the review is to discuss the potential for deleterious sequelae of sports concussion (mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI)), and management thereof. Discussion. Incidence of concussion in the field contact sports is high, not only for boxing, but also for soccer, football and especially rugby. An overview of studies investigating persistent deleterious cognitive and symptomatic outcome following cumulative sports MTBI suggests that individuals may be at risk for permanent neurological damage following participation in a contact sport. Established sequelae of traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically involving frontal systems include cognitive decline, behavioural changes such as diminished self-regulation and aggression, and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease. The presence of such consequences hidden within the context of the widely popularised contact sports, has societal implications that should be acknowledged. Compromised scholastic abilities and enhanced aggressive tendencies in association with sports MTBI are in need of further longitudinal research. Conclusion. A comprehensive preventive approach to the management of MTBI in sport is advocated that includes professionally applied neuropsychological assessment as a crucial component. Future policy considerations are the introduction of mandatory informed consent for participation in a high-risk contact sport such as rugby, particularly at youth level, and financial provision for concussion management amongst economically disadvantaged populations. South African Journal of Sports Medicine Vol. 19 (2) 2007: pp. 32-38
Cerebral damage in diving: Taking the cue from sports concussion medicine
AB Shuttleworth-Edwards, VJ Whitefield-Alexander
South African Journal of Sports Medicine , 2012,
Abstract: Within the compressed gas diving arena there is a risk of cerebral damage with deleterious neuropsychological sequelae in association with decompression illness (DCI), hypoxia, gas toxicity, as well as the cumulative subclinical effect of ‘silent’ paradoxical gas embolisms, the last being an area of growing concern. However, within diving medicine there is little evidence of the regular use of neuropsychological evaluation to monitor brain-related sequelae of frequent diving activity. In contrast, in recent years there has been an explosion of interest in the management of sports concussive injury, including emphasis on the pivotal role of neuropsychological evaluation within that context. Taking the cue from sports concussion medicine, it is proposed that there is an urgent need to incorporate neurocognitive baseline and follow-up screening as a core component in the medical management of those involved in intensive commercial and recreational compressed air diving activities. The objective would be to facilitate (i) accurate neurodiagnostic follow-up of frank DCI or an identifiable hypoxic or toxic incident; (ii) timeous identification of cumulative deleterious effects of repetitive subclinical hypoxic/toxic incidents and/or ‘silent’ paradoxical gas embolisms that might affect them in later life; and (iii) disability assessment following any such events or the combination thereof for rehabilitation and compensation purposes.
Family Structure and Psychological Health in Young Adults  [PDF]
Tony Cassidy, Elizabeth Wright, Elizabeth Noon
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.510129
Abstract:

This study explored the effect of the gendered structure of siblings in intact and non-intact families, on family relations, social support, perceived control, and psychological distress in a sample of 708 young adults (294 males and 414 females) aged between 18 - 21 years. Of the sample 96 were singletons, 208 had both a brother and sister, 206 had a brother and no sister, and 198 had a sister and no brother. While the results show that both the gender of the participants and the gender of the sibling seem to impact on distress and its mediators; the more important factor is the gender of siblings. In essence the presence of a female sibling is associated with more perceived support, control and optimism, and with lower pessimism and psychological distress. The presence of a female is also associated with better family relations overall and it is suggested that the main mechanism for this positive impact of female siblings is through the lowered conflict and increased expressiveness and cohesion experienced in female versus male dominated sibling groups.

Design of Sharp 2D Multiplier-Less Circularly Symmetric FIR Filter Using Harmony Search Algorithm and Frequency Transformation  [PDF]
Manju Manuel, Elizabeth Elias
Journal of Signal and Information Processing (JSIP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jsip.2012.33044
Abstract: In this paper, we present a novel and efficient method for the design of a sharp, two dimensional (2D) wideband, circularly symmetric, FIR filter. First of all, a sharp one dimensional (1D) infinite precision FIR filter is designed using the Frequency Response Masking (FRM) technique. This filter is converted into a multiplier-less filter by representing it in the Canonic Signed Digit (CSD) space. The design of the FRM filter in the CSD space calls for the use of a discrete optimization technique. To this end, a new optimization approach is proposed using a modified Harmony Search Algorithm (HSA). HSA is modified in such a way that, in every exploitation and exploration phase, the candidate solutions turns out to be integers. The 1D FRM multiplier-less filter, is in turn transformed to the 2D equivalent using the recently proposed multiplier-less transformations namely, T1 and T2. These transformations are successful in generating circular contours even for wideband filters. Since multipliers are the most power consuming elements in a 2D filter, the multiplier-less realization calls for reduced power consumption as well as computation time. Significant reduction in the computational complexity and computation time are the highlights of our proposed design technique. Besides, the proposed discrete optimization using modified HSA can be used to solve optimization problems in other engineering disciplines, where the search space consists of integers.
Ramifications Associated with Child Abuse  [PDF]
Hannah Mills, Elizabeth McCarroll
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2012.24036
Abstract: The incidence of child abuse has become quite prevalent and may be referred to as a global phenomenon (Pala, Unalacak, & Unluoglu, 2011). In terms of a global phenomenon, it may be significant to assess negative ramifications that are in existence for children’s overall social, emotional, and cognitive maturation (DeOliveira, Bailey, Moran, & Pederson, 2004). Specifically, preschool children who are abused within their home environments are less likely to detect variations in emotional expressions as compared to preschoolers who have not been abused (Pollak, Cicchetti, Hornung, & Reed, 2000). In regards to the domain of cognitive development, children who are reared in abusive home environments are likely to display overactive behaviors and exhibit less concentration (Schatz, Smith, Borkowski, Whitman, & Keogh, 2008). In relation, children reared in abusive environments are less likely to perform at high levels in regards to their math and reading abilities (Crozer & Barth, 2005). Thus, the act of child abuse may also be better well understood by assessing parenting styles and how they play a role with affecting the type of behaviors they elicit towards their children (Baumrind, 1994). For instance, specific traits or factors related to individuals’ parenting abilities, such as stress, depression, domestic violence, incarceration, and psychological difficulties may be more likely to abuse their children as opposed to parents who do not obtain these traits or factors (Nair, Schular, Black, Kettinger, & Harrington, 2003). Implications in regards to the prevalence of child abuse may be quite significant, especially considering psychological ramifications that may surface due to the act of children’s exposure to abuse (Johnson et al., 2002). For instance, children may be more likely to suppress, or internalize their emotions due to the exposure to child abuse and they may be more likely to externalize, or exhibit certain behaviors in an outward fashion towards others due to the immersion within environments comprised of child abuse (Schatz, Smith, Borkowski, Whitman, & Keogh, 2008). Furthermore, professionals who obtain the knowledge about child abuse may better serve families and children who have experienced abuse within their lives.
Popularity, likeability, and risk-taking in middle adolescence  [PDF]
Stephanie Hawke, Elizabeth Rieger
Health (Health) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/health.2013.56A3007
Abstract:

This study investigated the roles of adolescent popularity and likeability in eight domains of risk-taking in Australian grade 9 students (53% girls). The eight domains included previously examined areas of aggressive behaviours, alcohol use, and sexual intercourse, and areas where there is scarce information, including antisocial activities, unprotected intercourse, body image-related risk-taking, unsafe road practices, and stranger-related risk-taking. The results indicated a clear association between popularity and higher risk-taking in five of the eight domains. This is contrasted with likeability, which was not directly related to risk-taking aside from one two-way interaction with gender for sexual intercourse. The findings demonstrate the importance of including a broader range of risk-taking activities when considering popularity, particularly stranger-related risk-taking.

Extremes of Severe Storm Environments under a Changing Climate  [PDF]
Elizabeth Mannshardt, Eric Gilleland
American Journal of Climate Change (AJCC) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajcc.2013.23A005
Abstract:

One of the more critical issues in a changing climate is the behavior of extreme weather events, such as severe tornadic storms as seen recently in Moore and El Reno, Oklahoma. It is generally thought that such events would increase under a changing climate. How to evaluate this extreme behavior is a topic currently under much debate and investigation. One approach is to look at the behavior of large scale indicators of severe weather. The use of the generalized extreme value distribution for annual maxima is explored for a combination product of convective available potential energy and wind shear. Results from this initial study show successful modeling and high quantile prediction using extreme value methods. Predicted large scale values are consistent across different extreme value modeling frameworks, and a general increase over time in predicted values is indicated. A case study utilizing this methodology considers the large scale atmospheric indicators for the region of Moore, Oklahoma for Class EF5 tornadoes on May 3, 1999 and more recently on May 20, 2013, and for the class EF5 storm in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013.

What Does “Noise Pollution” Mean?  [PDF]
Alice Elizabeth González
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2014.54037
Abstract:

Noise features different characteristics that make it different from every other “classic” pollutant. Noise is invisible; it does not smell; it disappears when the source is turned off and leaves no traces in the environment. In addition, when people perceive something wrong about their hearing capacity, it is often long time after the beginning of noise exposure. This fact contributes to strengthening the misconception that noise is not harmful to human health or, at least, efforts and funds aim preferably at controling and decreasing the emission of other pollutants. Adding to this, most people tend to consider that noise is the price to pay for accessing to the amenities of the Technological Era and it is indivisible and inevitably linked to them. Last but not least, noise pollution could adversely affect ecosystems and ecological services. Then, how is it possible to convince the decision makers that noise pollution is one of the major current environmental problems? The aim of this paper is to discuss step by step the applicability of noise of a “pollution” definition, as a way to ease the understanding that lowering environmental noise levels should be prioritized: because it will lead to a healthier and better society.

Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Will Not Reduce in Low Resource Countries without the Anaesthetists’ Involvement  [PDF]
Elizabeth Ogboli-Nwasor
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2014.45037
Abstract:

Background: Maternal and foetal mortality is unacceptably high in most resource-limited countries and the practice of obstetric anaesthesia has an important influence on outcome for both mother and baby. The much needed close co-operation and collaboration between obstetricians and obstetric anaesthetist providers is crucial for the safety and comfort of parturients, particularly in low-resource environments. The current global maternal mortality is approximately 400 per 100,000 deliveries, with a range of 7 - 740 deaths per 100,000, demonstrating the inequality between the rich and poor countries. Many of the deaths could have been prevented by better essential obstetrics services including safe anaesthesia and surgery, provided such services are made available in a timely manner. Conclusion: Maternal mortality in low resource countries has its basis complex social, economic and political factors, underpinned by a lack of resources. Many of these factors are difficult and slow to resolve and are not specific to maternal health. Comprehensive essential obstetric care services at the district hospital level (first referral level) should include all the above plus safe surgery, safe anaesthesia, and blood transfusion. Government, donor agencies and all stakeholders must recognize the crucial role of anaesthesia in providing emergency obstetric care in hospitals. Advocacy by all concerned will help direct the scarce resources to the appropriate areas of need which includes provision of adequate facilities and manpower for safe anaesthesia.

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