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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1080 matches for " Elisabetta Zinellu "
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Association between Human Plasma Chondroitin Sulfate Isomers and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques
Elisabetta Zinellu,Antonio Junior Lepedda,Antonio Cigliano,Salvatore Pisanu,Angelo Zinellu,Ciriaco Carru,Pietro Paolo Bacciu,Franco Piredda,Anna Guarino,Rita Spirito,Marilena Formato
Biochemistry Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/281284
Abstract: Several studies have evidenced variations in plasma glycosaminoglycans content in physiological and pathological conditions. In normal human plasma GAGs are present mainly as undersulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible correlations between plasma CS level/structure and the presence/typology of carotid atherosclerotic lesion. Plasma CS was purified from 46 control subjects and 47 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy showing either a soft or a hard plaque. The concentration and structural characteristics of plasma CS were assessed by capillary electrophoresis of constituent unsaturated fluorophore-labeled disaccharides. Results showed that the concentration of total CS isomers was increased by 21.4% (<0.01) in plasma of patients, due to a significant increase of undersulfated CS. Consequently, in patients the plasma CS charge density was significantly reduced with respect to that of controls. After sorting for plaque typology, we found that patients with soft plaques and those with hard ones differently contribute to the observed changes. In plasma from patients with soft plaques, the increase in CS content was not associated with modifications of its sulfation pattern. On the contrary, the presence of hard plaques was associated with CS sulfation pattern modifications in presence of quite normal total CS isomers levels. These results suggest that the plasma CS content and structure could be related to the presence and the typology of atherosclerotic plaque and could provide a useful diagnostic tool, as well as information on the molecular mechanisms responsible for plaque instability.
Association between Human Plasma Chondroitin Sulfate Isomers and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques
Elisabetta Zinellu,Antonio Junior Lepedda,Antonio Cigliano,Salvatore Pisanu,Angelo Zinellu,Ciriaco Carru,Pietro Paolo Bacciu,Franco Piredda,Anna Guarino,Rita Spirito,Marilena Formato
Biochemistry Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/281284
Abstract: Several studies have evidenced variations in plasma glycosaminoglycans content in physiological and pathological conditions. In normal human plasma GAGs are present mainly as undersulfated chondroitin sulfate (CS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate possible correlations between plasma CS level/structure and the presence/typology of carotid atherosclerotic lesion. Plasma CS was purified from 46 control subjects and 47 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy showing either a soft or a hard plaque. The concentration and structural characteristics of plasma CS were assessed by capillary electrophoresis of constituent unsaturated fluorophore-labeled disaccharides. Results showed that the concentration of total CS isomers was increased by 21.4% ( ) in plasma of patients, due to a significant increase of undersulfated CS. Consequently, in patients the plasma CS charge density was significantly reduced with respect to that of controls. After sorting for plaque typology, we found that patients with soft plaques and those with hard ones differently contribute to the observed changes. In plasma from patients with soft plaques, the increase in CS content was not associated with modifications of its sulfation pattern. On the contrary, the presence of hard plaques was associated with CS sulfation pattern modifications in presence of quite normal total CS isomers levels. These results suggest that the plasma CS content and structure could be related to the presence and the typology of atherosclerotic plaque and could provide a useful diagnostic tool, as well as information on the molecular mechanisms responsible for plaque instability. 1. Introduction Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease characterized by the accumulation of lipids and fibrous elements in medium and large arteries. Plaque rupture and thrombosis are the most important clinical complication in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndromes and peripheral vascular disease [1, 2]. Although numerous risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are thought to play a role in the development and progression of this pathology [3], the mechanisms underlying plaque formation and progression are still largely unknown. Abnormal expression and structural modifications of arterial chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CS-PGs) have been implicated in atherosclerosis progression [4–6]. Arterial CS-PGs are markedly increased in early atherosclerotic lesions, participating in lipid retention, modification, and accumulation. Furthermore, CS-PGs play a key role in inflammation processes
Plasma L-Ergothioneine Measurement by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Capillary Electrophoresis after a Pre-Column Derivatization with 5-Iodoacetamidofluorescein (5-IAF) and Fluorescence Detection
Salvatore Sotgia, Elisabetta Pisanu, Gianfranco Pintus, Gian Luca Erre, Gerard Aime Pinna, Luca Deiana, Ciriaco Carru, Angelo Zinellu
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070374
Abstract: Two sensitive and reproducible capillary electrophoresis and high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence procedures were established for quantitative determination of L-egothioneine in plasma. After derivatization of L-ergothioneine with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein, the separation was carried out by HPLC on an ODS-2 C-18 sperisorb column by using a linear gradient elution and by HPCE on an uncoated fused silica capillary, 50 μm id, and 60 cm length. The methods were validated and found to be linear in the range of 0.3 to 10 μmol/l. The limit of quantification was 0.27 μmol/l for HPCE and 0.15 μmol/l for HPLC. The variations for intra- and inter-assay precision were around 6 RSD%, and the mean recovery accuracy close to 100% (96.11%).
Fine Structure of Glycosaminoglycans from Fresh and Decellularized Porcine Cardiac Valves and Pericardium
Antonio Cigliano,Alessandro Gandaglia,Antonio Junior Lepedda,Elisabetta Zinellu,Filippo Naso,Alessandra Gastaldello,Paola Aguiari,Pierina De Muro,Gino Gerosa,Michele Spina,Marilena Formato
Biochemistry Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/979351
Abstract: Cardiac valves are dynamic structures, exhibiting a highly specialized architecture consisting of cells and extracellular matrix with a relevant proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content, collagen and elastic fibers. Biological valve substitutes are obtained from xenogenic cardiac and pericardial tissues. To overcome the limits of such non viable substitutes, tissue engineering approaches emerged to create cell repopulated decellularized scaffolds. This study was performed to determine the glycosaminoglycans content, distribution, and disaccharides composition in porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and in pericardium before and after a detergent-based decellularization procedure. The fine structural characteristics of galactosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were examined by FACE. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of decellularized pericardium and its propensity to be repopulated by in vitro seeded fibroblasts were investigated. Results show that galactosaminoglycans and hyaluronan are differently distributed between pericardium and valves and within heart valves themselves before and after decellularization. The distribution of glycosaminoglycans is also dependent from the vascular district and topographic localization. The decellularization protocol adopted resulted in a relevant but not selective depletion of galactosaminoglycans. As a whole, data suggest that both decellularized porcine heart valves and bovine pericardium represent promising materials bearing the potential for future development of tissue engineered heart valve scaffolds.
Proteomic Analysis of Plasma-Purified VLDL, LDL, and HDL Fractions from Atherosclerotic Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy: Identification of Serum Amyloid A as a Potential Marker
Antonio J. Lepedda,Gabriele Nieddu,Elisabetta Zinellu,Pierina De Muro,Franco Piredda,Anna Guarino,Rita Spirito,Franco Carta,Francesco Turrini,Marilena Formato
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/385214
Abstract: Apolipoproteins are very heterogeneous protein family, implicated in plasma lipoprotein structural stabilization, lipid metabolism, inflammation, or immunity. Obtaining detailed information on apolipoprotein composition and structure may contribute to elucidating lipoprotein roles in atherogenesis and to developing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lipoprotein-associated disorders. This study aimed at developing a comprehensive method for characterizing the apolipoprotein component of plasma VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with Mass Spectrometry analysis, useful for identifying potential markers of plaque presence and vulnerability. The adopted method allowed obtaining reproducible 2-DE maps of exchangeable apolipoproteins from VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Twenty-three protein isoforms were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Differential proteomic analysis allowed for identifying increased levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A protein (AP SAA) in all lipoprotein fractions, especially in LDL from atherosclerotic patients. Results have been confirmed by western blotting analysis on each lipoprotein fraction using apo AI levels for data normalization. The higher levels of AP SAA found in patients suggest a role of LDL as AP SAA carrier into the subendothelial space of artery wall, where AP SAA accumulates and may exert noxious effects. 1. Introduction Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death and illness in developed countries, with atherosclerosis being the most important contributor. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition that could turn into an acute clinical event due to plaque rupture and thrombosis [1]. Indeed, vascular inflammation not only plays a major role in the development of atherosclerosis but also contributes to the acute onset of thrombotic complications [2]. The selective retention of circulating apolipoprotein B100 containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space, by means of specific interactions with artery wall proteoglycans, is currently thought to be the leading event in atherogenesis [3, 4]. Lipoproteins are supramolecular complexes that deliver insoluble lipids from the tissues where they are synthesized to those that metabolize or store them. They consist of hydrophobic molecules (core), particularly triacylglycerol and cholesteryl esters, stabilized by a coat of amphipathic compounds, namely, phospholipids, unesterified cholesterol, and proteins, with the latter referred to as
Fine Structure of Glycosaminoglycans from Fresh and Decellularized Porcine Cardiac Valves and Pericardium
Antonio Cigliano,Alessandro Gandaglia,Antonio Junior Lepedda,Elisabetta Zinellu,Filippo Naso,Alessandra Gastaldello,Paola Aguiari,Pierina De Muro,Gino Gerosa,Michele Spina,Marilena Formato
Biochemistry Research International , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/979351
Abstract: Cardiac valves are dynamic structures, exhibiting a highly specialized architecture consisting of cells and extracellular matrix with a relevant proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan content, collagen and elastic fibers. Biological valve substitutes are obtained from xenogenic cardiac and pericardial tissues. To overcome the limits of such non viable substitutes, tissue engineering approaches emerged to create cell repopulated decellularized scaffolds. This study was performed to determine the glycosaminoglycans content, distribution, and disaccharides composition in porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and in pericardium before and after a detergent-based decellularization procedure. The fine structural characteristics of galactosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate were examined by FACE. Furthermore, the mechanical properties of decellularized pericardium and its propensity to be repopulated by in vitro seeded fibroblasts were investigated. Results show that galactosaminoglycans and hyaluronan are differently distributed between pericardium and valves and within heart valves themselves before and after decellularization. The distribution of glycosaminoglycans is also dependent from the vascular district and topographic localization. The decellularization protocol adopted resulted in a relevant but not selective depletion of galactosaminoglycans. As a whole, data suggest that both decellularized porcine heart valves and bovine pericardium represent promising materials bearing the potential for future development of tissue engineered heart valve scaffolds. 1. Introduction Heart valve disease has a deep impact worldwide related with the large number of valvular replacement operations performed every year. Typical valve substitutes are mechanical prostheses and bioprostheses obtained from cardiac-valvulated conduits (aortic and pulmonary root) or pericardial tissue of porcine and bovine origin. Bioprosthetic valves, although associated with a lower risk of thromboembolism with respect to the mechanical ones, possess limited longevity due to dystrophic calcification consequent to glutaraldehyde (GA) treatment used for preventing rejection [1] and suffer for many of the same degenerative processes that afflict native valves [2]. In the last years, tissue engineering (TE) approaches raised in response to limitations associated with tissue and organ transplantation and with the scarcity of available donors. Three are the components essential for a TE substitute: cells, scaffolds (designed to maintain the cells in a three-dimensional environment),
A Wood Preservative Based on Commercial Silica Nanodispersions and Boric Acid against Fungal Decay through Laboratory and Field Tests  [PDF]
Sabrina Palanti, Elisabetta Feci
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2013.32009
Abstract:

The paper is based on the development of a wood preservative without metal salts to be used in use classes 3 and 4 (EN 335), eco-friendly and harmless to humans and animals. Boric acid was used as a biocide, due to its effectiveness against fungi and insects. It is also known to be easily leached from wood exposed to weather action. Colloidal silica was therefore added in the formulations to guarantee the fixation of boric acid to wood. The different formulations were tested for the protective efficacy against decay fungi through laboratory tests (EN 113) and field trials (EN 252). The results were promising, especially those concerning boron fixation and efficacy against decay fungi through laboratory tests, where some formulations and retentions gave a durability class 1 (very durable) according to EN 350-1. The fourth evaluation, after 50 months of field trials showed only a slight difference between the treated samples and controls.

 

 

Measuring the Horizon: Objectivity, Subjectivity and the Dignity of Human Personal Identity  [PDF]
Francis J. Ambrosio, Elisabetta Lanzilao
Open Journal of Philosophy (OJPP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2013.34A006
Abstract: It is argued in what follows that “culture warfare” is symptomatic of an imminent threat to the continued sustainability of human culture as a whole. The nature of this threat can be characterized as trauma induced paralysis of the human cultural imagination, without which cooperative adaptation to potential credible dangers of self-induced species or even planetary life extinction is impossible. The structure of this paradoxical “possible impossibility” as the destiny of humanity is examined here within the context of an interpretive framework which is broadly characterized as “cultural genetics”. On the basis of a schematic and preliminary outline of that framework, a suggestion is made regarding the direction in which hope of avoiding that destiny might be sought.
Complete III Cranial Nerve Palsy in a Leather Worker: An Unusual Case Report  [PDF]
Adriano Magli, Elisabetta Chiariello Vecchio
Open Journal of Ophthalmology (OJOph) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojoph.2014.43014
Abstract:

This case report describes features and surgical management in one patient that developed a worsening total III cranial nerve palsy in his right eye. Our 45 year-old male patient worked for about 25 years in leather tanning industry. He underwent medical history, routine blood test, eye exams that included visual acuity measurement, slit-lamp examination, dilated retinal biomicroscopy and indirect ophthalmoscopy, fundus photography, tonometry, corneal pachymetry, Krimsky test, oculomotor examination and eye deviation surgery. On examination of the fellow eye wasn’t found any disease. Stroke, aneurysm and intracerebral causes of third nerve palsy were excluded, and medical history was negative for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, trauma, neurological disease unless two previous polyneuropathies episodes and one herpetic keratitis episode. Result of any neuroimaging studies were recorded (Our patients performed in hospital CT, MRI and MRI angiography and all the testes were normal). To our knowledge third cranial nerve palsy has never been observed in literature in leather workers. In conclusion, it is important for ophthalmologists to evaluate carefully work history and lifestyle persons and plan the surgical approach focusing the different characteristics of these patients.

Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events
Elisabetta Tosti
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7827-4-26
Abstract: Oogenesis is characterized by a unique process of cell division occurring only in gametes, called meiosis; whose goal is the production of haploid cells highly specialized for fertilization. In the majority of species the oocyte arrests in different stages of meiotic division, in particular, the block occurring in the first meiotic prophase (PI) marks the state of immature oocyte characterized by a prominent nucleus called the germinal vesicle (GV), which contains de-condensed transcriptionally active chromatin [[1] for a review]. As a general scheme, in response to a stimulus, meiosis is resumed and manifested by a germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), it then progresses to metaphase I (MI) or II (MII) where it undergoes a second arrest that is removed after successful fertilization.Oocyte maturation is usually defined as the period of progression from the first to the second meiotic arrest and involves coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic modifications [2]. These are highly complex processes and their interplay is regulated by a series of sequential molecular events. Nuclear maturation starts with the GVBD, ends at the meiosis exit, and is marked by the presence of the two polar bodies. Cytoplasmic maturation is a more obscure process and involves both morphological and functional alterations related to: i) changes in the expression profile of cell cycle control proteins responsible for driving the oocyte towards developmental competencies [3-5]; ii) relocation of organelles [6-8]; iii) transcriptional modifications of mRNA [9], modification of the plasma membrane permeability [10,11]; iv) the differentiation of the calcium signalling machinery [12].Although the arrest at the PI stage seems to be strictly correlated with the oocyte growth, the meiotic stage correlated with fertilizable oocyte is species-specific. In some animals, oocytes are fertilized at the PI stage (anellida, plateyhelminthes, polychaeta, mollusca, arthropoda, echinoderms, and some mammals) or, on
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