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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 169123 matches for " E. Jordan "
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Identifying and promoting safe walking routes in older adults  [PDF]
Jacqueline Kerr, Jordan A. Carlson, Dori E. Rosenberg, Ashley Withers
Health (Health) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/health.2012.429112
Abstract: Background: Walking for physical activity is important for older adults' physical and mental health. We developed and tested the reliability of an environmental audit tool designed to be used by lay people to identify appropriate walking routes for older adults trying to increase their physical activity. Methods: A 44-item Walking Route Audit Tool for Seniors (WRATS) was developed based on literature review and input from older adults during focus groups. Observers completed the tool for 24 walking routes which were specifically selected to maximize variability in environment features and quality. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using Kappa and percent agreement. Results: Inter-rater reliability was good to excellent for 27 of the 44 WRATS items and moderate for 9 items. ICCs were good to excellent for 6 of the 8 scales (ICCs = 0.61 to 0.90). Conclusions: These results provide evidence for the reliability of WRATS for evaluating environmental attributes of walking routes suitable for older adults. Some scales need further refinement, and validity should be tested in a sample of older adults.
Bioassay and Characterization of Several Palmer Amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) Biotypes with Varying Tolerances to Glyphosate  [PDF]
Robert E. Hoagland, Robin H. Jordan, Neal D. Teaster
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2013.45127
Abstract:

The wide distribution of Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) in the southern US became a serious weed control problem prior to the extensive use of glyphosate-resistant crops. Currently glyphosate-resistant populations of Palmer amaranth occur in many areas of this geographic region creating an even more serious threat to crop production. Investigations were undertaken using four biotypes (one glyphosate-sensitive, one resistant from Georgia and two of unknown tolerance from Mississippi) of Palmer amaranth to assess bioassay techniques for the rapid detection and level of resistance in populations of this weed. These plants were characterized with respect to chlorophyll, betalain, and protein levels and immunological responses to an antibody of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) the target site of glyphosate. Only slight differences were found in four biotypes grown under greenhouse conditions regarding extractable soluble protein and chlorophyll content, but one biotype was found to be devoid of the red pigment, betalain. Measurement of early growth (seedling shoot elongation) of seedlings was a useful detection tool to determine glyphosate resistance. A leaf disc bioassay (using visual ratings and/or chlorophyll analysis) and an assay for shikimate accumulation were effective methods for determining herbicide resistance levels. The two unknown biotypes were found to be resistant to this herbicide. Some differences were found in the protein profiles of the biotypes, and western blots demonstrated a weak labeling of antibody in the glyphosate-sensitive biotype, whereas strong labeling occurred in the resistant plants. This latter point supports research by others, that increased copy number of the EPSPS gene (and increased EPSPS protein levels) is the resistance mechanism in this species. Results indicate the utility of certain bioassays for the determination of resistance and provide useful comparative information on the levels of inherent constituents among closely related plants.

Treatment of Organized Hematoma of the Sphenoid Sinus with Pre-Operative Embolization and Endoscopic Resection  [PDF]
Prabhat K. Bhama, Diana C. Jordan, Greg E. Davis
Open Journal of Radiology (OJRad) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ojrad.2011.12007
Abstract: The differential diagnosis for expansile masses of the sphenoid sinuses includes both benign and malignant lesions. We herein present a case of a 79-year-old female who presented with chronic epistaxis and an expansile soft tissue mass centered in the sphenoid sinus with erosion of the skull base. Endoscopic resection of the lesion was performed, with histopathological examination revealing organized hematoma. To our knowl- edge, this is the first reported case of sphenoid sinus organizing hematoma treated with pre-operative embolization followed by endoscopic excision.
Weight neutrality with the DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin: Mechanistic basis and clinical experience
James E Foley, Jens Jordan
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S10952
Abstract: ht neutrality with the DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin: Mechanistic basis and clinical experience Review (4457) Total Article Views Authors: James E Foley, Jens Jordan Published Date July 2010 Volume 2010:6 Pages 541 - 548 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/VHRM.S10952 James E Foley1, Jens Jordan2 1Clinical Research and Development, Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey, USA; 2Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany Abstract: Various factors may confound how diabetes medications affect a patient’s weight. Agents that induce hypoglycemia may promote weight gain through “defensive eating”. Conversely, patients whose hyperglycemia exceeds the renal glucose threshold may overeat to compensate for calories lost in urine and so gain weight when drug therapy ablates glycosuria. Some drugs, such as thiazolidinediones, may promote weight gain via increased lipid storage. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase satiety, delay gastric emptying, and generally produce weight loss. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are generally weight-neutral, although modest weight loss has been observed with the DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, in patients with relatively low baseline glycemia. The weight neutrality of vildagliptin likely results in part from its intrinsically low risk for hypoglycemia. Recent studies point to additional potential mechanisms. One study found that drug-na ve patients randomized to vildagliptin exhibited significantly lower chylomicron lipid and apolipoprotein levels than placebo patients, suggesting that vildagliptin may inhibit intestinal fat extraction. Another trial found that patients randomized to vildagliptin versus placebo experienced paradoxical postprandial increases in markers of fatty acid mobilization and oxidation, in conjunction with increased sympathetic stimulation. Elaboration of these and other pathways could further clarify the origins of the favorable weight profile of vildagriptin.
Weight neutrality with the DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin: Mechanistic basis and clinical experience
James E Foley,Jens Jordan
Vascular Health and Risk Management , 2010,
Abstract: James E Foley1, Jens Jordan21Clinical Research and Development, Novartis Pharmaceutical Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey, USA; 2Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, GermanyAbstract: Various factors may confound how diabetes medications affect a patient’s weight. Agents that induce hypoglycemia may promote weight gain through “defensive eating”. Conversely, patients whose hyperglycemia exceeds the renal glucose threshold may overeat to compensate for calories lost in urine and so gain weight when drug therapy ablates glycosuria. Some drugs, such as thiazolidinediones, may promote weight gain via increased lipid storage. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists increase satiety, delay gastric emptying, and generally produce weight loss. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are generally weight-neutral, although modest weight loss has been observed with the DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, in patients with relatively low baseline glycemia. The weight neutrality of vildagliptin likely results in part from its intrinsically low risk for hypoglycemia. Recent studies point to additional potential mechanisms. One study found that drug-na ve patients randomized to vildagliptin exhibited significantly lower chylomicron lipid and apolipoprotein levels than placebo patients, suggesting that vildagliptin may inhibit intestinal fat extraction. Another trial found that patients randomized to vildagliptin versus placebo experienced paradoxical postprandial increases in markers of fatty acid mobilization and oxidation, in conjunction with increased sympathetic stimulation. Elaboration of these and other pathways could further clarify the origins of the favorable weight profile of vildagriptin.Keywords: DPP-4 inhibitor, type 2 diabetes mellitus, vildagliptin, weight
A Model-based Semi-Supervised Clustering Methodology
Jordan Yoder,Carey E. Priebe
Statistics , 2014,
Abstract: We consider an extension of model-based clustering to the semi-supervised case, where some of the data are pre-labeled. We provide a derivation of the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) approximation to the Bayes factor in this setting. We then use the BIC to the select number of clusters and the variables useful for clustering. We demonstrate the efficacy of this adaptation of the model-based clustering paradigm through two simulation examples and a fly larvae behavioral dataset in which lines of neurons are clustered into behavioral groups.
The Goldilocks Model for TCR—Too Much Attraction Might Not Be Best for Vaccine Design
Jill E. Slansky,Kimberly R. Jordan
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000482
Abstract:
Using current molecular techniques for rapid differentiation of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Typhimurium
R Jordan, E van Heerden, LA Piater
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2009,
Abstract: Typhoid fever is responsible for the deaths of many people annually. However, conventional and timeconsuming detection methods for Salmonella Typhi still dominate. By using a molecular based approach, it was possible to identify Salmonella Typhi by amplifying two specific genes (viaB and tyv) and by using RFLP analysis on the 16S rRNA gene as a first step for identification. We were also able to identify Salmonella Typhi using multiple gene targets in a single multiplex PCR reaction. Here we show that, as opposed to conventional methods, molecular based approaches are more rapid and should thus be used for any initial detection of Salmonella Typhi.
The Goldilocks Model for TCR—Too Much Attraction Might Not Be Best for Vaccine Design
Jill E. Slansky ,Kimberly R. Jordan
PLOS Biology , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000482
Abstract:
Electric dipole moments and disalignment of interstellar dust grains
Margaret E. Jordan,Joseph C. Weingartner
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.15480.x
Abstract: The degree to which interstellar grains align with respect to the interstellar magnetic field depends on disaligning as well as aligning mechanisms. For decades, it was assumed that disalignment was due primarily to the random angular impulses a grain receives when colliding with gas-phase atoms. Recently, a new disalignment mechanism has been considered, which may be very potent for a grain that has a time-varying electric dipole moment and drifts across the magnetic field. We provide quantitative estimates of the disalignment times for silicate grains with size > approximately 0.1 micron. These appear to be shorter than the time-scale for alignment by radiative torques, unless the grains contain superparamagnetic inclusions.
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