oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 853 matches for " Donna Goodridge "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /853
Display every page Item
Planning for Serious Illness amongst Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Donna Goodridge
Nursing Research and Practice , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/427917
Abstract:
Planning for Serious Illness amongst Community-Dwelling Older Adults
Donna Goodridge
Nursing Research and Practice , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/427917
Abstract: Older adults have long been encouraged to maintain their autonomy by expressing their wishes for health care before they become too ill to meaningfully participate in decision making. This study explored the manner in which community-dwelling adults aged 55 and older plan for serious illness. An online survey was conducted within the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, with 283 adults ranging in age from 55 to 88 years. Planning for future medical care was important for the majority (78.4%) of respondents, although only 25.4% possessed a written advance care plan and 41.5% had designated a substitute decision maker. Sixty percent of respondents reported conversations about their treatment wishes; nearly half had discussed unacceptable states of health. Associations between key predictor variables and planning behaviors (discussions about treatment wishes or unacceptable states of health; designation of a substitute decision maker; preparation of a written advance care plan) were assessed using binary logistic regression. After controlling for all predictor variables, self-reported knowledge about advance care planning was the key variable significantly associated with all four planning behaviors. The efforts of nurses to educate older adults regarding the process of advance care planning can play an important role in enhancing autonomy. 1. Introduction Given that almost three quarters of older adults lack decision-making capacity when urgent choices about life-sustaining treatment need to be made [1], older adults have long been encouraged by nurses and other health care providers to express their wishes for health care while they are healthy enough to meaningfully participate in treatment decision-making. Advance care planning has been recently promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [2] as a process contributing to overall public health through its focus on supporting the individuals’ health care choices and preventing unnecessary suffering. Widespread social marketing of advance care planning has made many excellent online and print resources available to the public [2–4]. Although advance care planning is now seen as an iterative process that includes the way in which people think about and communicate their values and preferences so that they may receive the health care they desire in the case of life-threatening illness [5], much of the extant research in this area has focused upon the completion of written advance care plans. Using a population-based approach, this study addressed the research question “How do community-dwelling
Fatigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program
Cindy J Wong, Donna Goodridge, Darcy D Marciniuk, et al
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S12321
Abstract: tigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program Short Report (8175) Total Article Views Authors: Cindy J Wong, Donna Goodridge, Darcy D Marciniuk, et al Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:5 Pages 319 - 326 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S12321 Cindy J Wong1, Donna Goodridge1, Darcy D Marciniuk2, Donna Rennie1,3 1College of Nursing, 2College of Medicine, 3Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada Background: Fatigue is a distressing, complex, multidimensional sensation common in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While fatigue negatively impacts functional performance and quality of life, there has been little study of the fatigue that affects participants in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and physical dimensions of fatigue and their relationships to dyspnea, mental health, sleep, and physiologic factors. Patients and methods: A convenience sample of 42 pulmonary rehabilitation participants with COPD completed self-report questionnaires which measured dimensions of fatigue using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data on other clinical variables were abstracted from pulmonary rehabilitation program health records. Results: Almost all (95.3%) participants experienced high levels of physical fatigue. High levels of fatigue were also reported for the dimensions of reduced activity (88.1%), reduced motivation (83.3%), mental fatigue (69.9%), and general fatigue (54.5%). Close to half (42.9%) of participants reported symptoms of anxiety, while almost one quarter (21.4%) reported depressive symptoms. Age was related to the fatigue dimensions of reduced activity (ρ = 0.43, P < 0.01) and reduced motivation (ρ = 0.31, P < 0.05). Anxiety was related to reduced motivation (ρ = -0.47, P < 0.01). Fatigue was not associated with symptoms of depression, sleep quality, gender, supplemental oxygen use, smoking status, or Medical Research Council dyspnea scores. Conclusions: Fatigue (particularly the physical and reduced motivation dimensions of fatigue) was experienced by almost all participants with COPD attending this pulmonary rehabilitation program. Fatigue affected greater proportions of participants than either anxiety or depression. The high prevalence of fatigue may impact on enrolment, participation, and attrition in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Further investigation of the nature, correlates, and impact of fatigue in this population is required.
Factors associated with opioid dispensation for patients with COPD and lung cancer in the last year of life: A retrospective analysis
Donna Goodridge, Josh Lawson, Graeme Rocker, et al
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S9938
Abstract: ctors associated with opioid dispensation for patients with COPD and lung cancer in the last year of life: A retrospective analysis Original Research (3454) Total Article Views Authors: Donna Goodridge, Josh Lawson, Graeme Rocker, et al Published Date April 2010 Volume 2010:5 Pages 99 - 105 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S9938 Donna Goodridge1, Josh Lawson2, Graeme Rocker3, Darcy Marciniuk4, Donna Rennie1,2 1College of Nursing, 2Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada Background: For patients in late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), dyspnea is often refractory to conventional treatment. We know little about the use of opioids in ameliorating dyspnea in this population. In this study we explored factors associated with opioid dispensation within the last year of life and differences in opioid dispensation for persons with lung cancer or COPD. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study we used administrative health data gained from 1,035 residents of Saskatchewan, Canada to examine patterns of community opioid dispensation in the last year of life. Factors associated with opioid use were determined using multiple logistic regression. Results: When compared with those with lung cancer, fewer patients with COPD were given opioids within the last week of life; the last month of life, and the last 3 months of life. After adjusting for relevant predictors, patients with lung cancer were more than twice as likely as those with COPD to fill prescriptions for the following: morphine (odds ratio [OR] 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52–3.67); hydromorphone (OR 2.69, 95% CI: 1.53–4.72); transdermal fentanyl (OR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.28–3.98); or any of these opioids (OR 2.61, 95% CI: 1.80–3.80). Conclusion: These opioids are dispensed only for a small proportion of patients with COPD at the end of their lives. Future researchers could explore the efficacy and safety of opioid use for patients with advanced COPD, and whether their limited use is justified.
Fatigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program
Cindy J Wong,Donna Goodridge,Darcy D Marciniuk,et al
International Journal of COPD , 2010,
Abstract: Cindy J Wong1, Donna Goodridge1, Darcy D Marciniuk2, Donna Rennie1,31College of Nursing, 2College of Medicine, 3Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, CanadaBackground: Fatigue is a distressing, complex, multidimensional sensation common in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While fatigue negatively impacts functional performance and quality of life, there has been little study of the fatigue that affects participants in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and physical dimensions of fatigue and their relationships to dyspnea, mental health, sleep, and physiologic factors.Patients and methods: A convenience sample of 42 pulmonary rehabilitation participants with COPD completed self-report questionnaires which measured dimensions of fatigue using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data on other clinical variables were abstracted from pulmonary rehabilitation program health records.Results: Almost all (95.3%) participants experienced high levels of physical fatigue. High levels of fatigue were also reported for the dimensions of reduced activity (88.1%), reduced motivation (83.3%), mental fatigue (69.9%), and general fatigue (54.5%). Close to half (42.9%) of participants reported symptoms of anxiety, while almost one quarter (21.4%) reported depressive symptoms. Age was related to the fatigue dimensions of reduced activity (ρ = 0.43, P < 0.01) and reduced motivation (ρ = 0.31, P < 0.05). Anxiety was related to reduced motivation (ρ = -0.47, P < 0.01). Fatigue was not associated with symptoms of depression, sleep quality, gender, supplemental oxygen use, smoking status, or Medical Research Council dyspnea scores.Conclusions: Fatigue (particularly the physical and reduced motivation dimensions of fatigue) was experienced by almost all participants with COPD attending this pulmonary rehabilitation program. Fatigue affected greater proportions of participants than either anxiety or depression. The high prevalence of fatigue may impact on enrolment, participation, and attrition in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Further investigation of the nature, correlates, and impact of fatigue in this population is required.Keywords: COPD, fatigue, pulmonary rehabilitation, anxiety, depression, sleep quality
Factors associated with opioid dispensation for patients with COPD and lung cancer in the last year of life: A retrospective analysis
Donna Goodridge,Josh Lawson,Graeme Rocker,et al
International Journal of COPD , 2010,
Abstract: Donna Goodridge1, Josh Lawson2, Graeme Rocker3, Darcy Marciniuk4, Donna Rennie1,21College of Nursing, 2Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 4College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaBackground: For patients in late stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), dyspnea is often refractory to conventional treatment. We know little about the use of opioids in ameliorating dyspnea in this population. In this study we explored factors associated with opioid dispensation within the last year of life and differences in opioid dispensation for persons with lung cancer or COPD.Methods: In this retrospective cohort study we used administrative health data gained from 1,035 residents of Saskatchewan, Canada to examine patterns of community opioid dispensation in the last year of life. Factors associated with opioid use were determined using multiple logistic regression.Results: When compared with those with lung cancer, fewer patients with COPD were given opioids within the last week of life; the last month of life, and the last 3 months of life. After adjusting for relevant predictors, patients with lung cancer were more than twice as likely as those with COPD to fill prescriptions for the following: morphine (odds ratio [OR] 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52–3.67); hydromorphone (OR 2.69, 95% CI: 1.53–4.72); transdermal fentanyl (OR 2.25, 95% CI: 1.28–3.98); or any of these opioids (OR 2.61, 95% CI: 1.80–3.80).Conclusion: These opioids are dispensed only for a small proportion of patients with COPD at the end of their lives. Future researchers could explore the efficacy and safety of opioid use for patients with advanced COPD, and whether their limited use is justified.Keywords: COPD, lung cancer, dyspnea, opioid dispensation, palliative care
The transition experience of rural older persons with advanced cancer and their families: a grounded theory study
Wendy D Duggleby, Kelly L Penz, Donna M Goodridge, Donna M Wilson, Beverly D Leipert, Patricia H Berry, Sylvia R Keall, Christopher J Justice
BMC Palliative Care , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-684x-9-5
Abstract: Using a grounded theory approach, 27 open-ended individual audio-taped interviews were conducted with six older rural persons with advanced cancer and 10 bereaved family caregivers. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 12 palliative care health care professionals. All interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed using Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory approach.Within a rural context of isolation, lack of information and limited accessibility to services, and values of individuality and community connectedness, older rural palliative patients and their families experienced multiple complex transitions in environment, roles/relationships, activities of daily living, and physical and mental health. Transitions disrupted the lives of palliative patients and their caregivers, resulting in distress and uncertainty. Rural palliative patients and their families adapted to transitions through the processes of "Navigating Unknown Waters". This tentative theory includes processes of coming to terms with their situation, connecting, and redefining normal. Timely communication, provision of information and support networks facilitated the processes.The emerging theory provides a foundation for future research. Significant transitions identified in this study may serve as a focus for improving delivery of palliative and end of life care in rural areas. Improved understanding of the transitions experienced by advanced cancer palliative care patients and their families, as well as the psychological processes involved in adapting to the transitions, will help health care providers address the unique needs of this vulnerable population.Transitions are ongoing processes characterized by change for an individual [1] during which a new situation or circumstance is incorporated into their lives [2]. Individuals receiving palliative care may experience multiple transitions such as changes in treatment, symptoms, functional status and quality of life [3]. The
A descriptive-comparative study of medications used by older people prior to and following admission to a continuing care facility  [PDF]
Alysha Visram, Donna Wilson
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2012.21002
Abstract: Medications are beneficial for curing or managing acute and chronic illnesses. Medications typically have positive outcomes, although older people are prone to drug-related problems. Community-dwelling seniors are at particularly high risk of polypharmacy, as they tend to receive many prescriptions over time and from different care providers. Continuing-care facility admission presents an excellent opportunity for a comprehensive medication review. A research study was conducted to describe and compare medications taken by community-dwelling seniors prior to and following admission to a continuing-care facility. This pilot project involved data being gathered from the charts of deceased residents, as required by a University Health Research Ethics Board, who had been cared for at one large local continuing-care facility. The facility administrators also approved this study, in part to evaluate their policy to conduct a medication review for all new residents within six weeks of entry. This study revealed a slight but statistically significant reduction in the number of medications following this review. Other issues such as medication interactions and required dosage changes were addressed by this medication review. Although this study was confined to one continuing-care facility and a small number of residents, the findings suggest medication reviews would be beneficial upon admission to all continuing-care facilities, and annually perhaps through other means for older persons living in the community.
Preschool Teachers Understanding of Science Identity  [PDF]
Donna Farland-Smith
Creative Education (CE) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2018.92019
Abstract: This study utilized a survey to analyze preschool teachers’ perceptions of science identity before and after watching an episode of?Sid the Science Kid?during a professional development. A total of twelve teachers participated in the study by completing pre and post survey questions. The one question that was addressed during this study was how teachers felt about science identity before and after watching the Sid the Science Kid episode? Two notable conclusions were a result of this study 1) preschool teacher’s lack of awareness and understanding of science identity; and 2) preschool teacher’s appreciation and willingness of students’ to role play being a scientist, but little understanding of why this role play is beneficial.
Antenatal Marijuana Use Is Unrelated to Sexually Transmitted Infections During Pregnancy
Joseph M. Miller Jr.,Christina Goodridge
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2000, DOI: 10.1155/s106474490000020x
Abstract: Objective: This study evaluated the relationship between marijuana use and sexually transmitted diseases in pregnant women.
Page 1 /853
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.