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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 465199 matches for " Donald A. Bailey "
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Les Châteaux de Landiras et de Montferrand and Their Seigneurial Families—Part One: Setting, Medieval History, and Genealogy  [PDF]
Donald A. Bailey
Advances in Historical Studies (AHS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ahs.2013.22012
Abstract: Apart from Arnaud Communay’s “Genealogical Essay”, as he himself noted (1889: v), the Montferrands of the Bordeaux region have been neglected.1 The present approach to their history initiated in research on the Chateau de Landiras, whose baronial family tended to heiresses until one of them married a Montferrand. So began a four-century association of the “first and second baronies of Guyenne”! This first part will describe the socio-geographical settings of the two branches, some of their medieval experiences, and then proceed to presenting the combined genealogies—a task not previously attempted. The second part will narrate their respective and blended subsequent histories.
Les Châteaux de Landiras et de Montferrand and Their Seigneurial Families—Part Two: Two Families—One Destiny  [PDF]
Donald A. Bailey
Advances in Historical Studies (AHS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ahs.2013.23020
Abstract: Emerging from the Hundred Years’ War, the Montferrand families acquired Renaissance associations, experienced internal divisions during the Reformation, generated Bordeaux’s only saint, and came up to the Revolution with the usual noble financial challenges. Deeply opposed to the Revolution, they suffered confiscation and parcellization and barely held onto any property at all. The core estate of the Chateau de Landiras finds its modern renown in its fine grave wines.
Nursing Roles and Strategies in End-of-Life Decision Making in Acute Care: A Systematic Review of the Literature
Judith A. Adams,Donald E. Bailey Jr.,Ruth A. Anderson,Sharron L. Docherty
Nursing Research and Practice , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/527834
Abstract: The objective of this paper is to analyze the literature concerning nurses' roles and strategies in EOL decision making in acute care environments, synthesize the findings, and identify implications for future research. We conducted searches in CINAHL and PubMed, using a broad range of terms. The 44 articles retained for review had quantitative and qualitative designs and represented ten countries. These articles were entered into a matrix to facilitate examining patterns, themes, and relationships across studies. Three nursing roles emerged from the synthesis of the literature: information broker, supporter, and advocate, each with a set of strategies nurses use to enact the roles. Empirical evidence linking these nursing roles and strategies to patients and family members outcomes is lacking. Understanding how these strategies and activities are effective in helping patients and families make EOL decisions is an area for future research. 1. Introduction End-of-life (EOL) decision making in acute care is complex, involving difficult decisions, such as whether to initiate or discontinue life support, place a feeding tube or a tracheostomy, or initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the event of a cardiac arrest. Because of the severity of illness and the nature of treatments, acutely ill patients often lack decision making capacity, which puts the family members in the role of decision-maker [1–4]. One of the biggest challenges to EOL decision making is prognostic uncertainty and determining when to initiate EOL discussions with family members [5, 6]. Nurses and physicians express fear of removing all hope, making the wrong decision or giving up too soon [7–9]. Further, it is difficult emotionally for both family members and health care professionals to give up on curative care [6, 10, 11]. Unfortunately, health care professionals feel inadequately trained to determine when and how to initiate these discussions [6, 12, 13]. Thus, EOL discussions may begin when the physician decides to discuss a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order, which often takes place when the prognosis is poor [14] and the patient is no longer able to participate. A study of intensive care unit (ICU) cultures revealed that the decision to insert a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube and a tracheostomy often triggered EOL discussions, which, on some units, did not occur until the patient was imminently dying [15]. Another factor that makes EOL decision making difficult is the lack of clarity in the roles of the different health care professionals. Although it is the
Partial Formalization: An Approach for Critical Analysis of Definitions and Methods Used in Bulk Extraction-Based Molecular Microbial Ecology  [PDF]
Donald A. Klein
Open Journal of Ecology (OJE) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/oje.2015.58033
Abstract: Partial formalization, which involves the development of deductive connections among statements, can be used to examine assumptions, definitions and related methodologies that are used in science. This approach has been applied to the study of nucleic acids recovered from natural microbial assemblages (NMA) by the use of bulk extraction. Six pools of bulk-extractable nucleic acids (BENA) are suggested to be present in a NMA: (pool 1) inactive microbes (abiotic-limited); (pool 2) inactive microbes (abiotic permissive, biotic-limited); (pool 3) dormant microbes (abiotic permissive, biotic-limited, but can become biotic permissive); (pool 4) in situ active microbes (the microbial community); (pool 5) viruses (virocells/virions/cryptic viral genomes); and (pool 6) extracellular nucleic acids including extracellular DNA (eDNA). Definitions for cells, the microbial community (in situ active cells), the rare biosphere, dormant cells (the microbial seed bank), viruses (virocells/virions/cryptic viral genomic), and diversity are presented, together with methodology suggested to allow their study. The word diversity will require at least 4 definitions, each involving a different methodology. These suggested definitions and methodologies should make it possible to make further advances in bulk extraction-based molecular microbial ecology.
A Mathematical Model for Nutrient Metabolic Chemistry  [PDF]
Donald A. Drew
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/am.2018.96045
Abstract:
A model based on chemical kinetics for the rate of utilization and/or storage of carbohydrates, fats and proteins is derived and analyzed. This system is studied under different conditions of supply and usage and for short term dynamics and long term dynamics. Both the short term and long term models indicate that starting above an equilibrium threshold leads to growth of the stored species. Results from the short-term and long-term submodels show that the qualitative behavior depends on the levels of certain enzymes. The analysis of a model for enzyme dynamics indicates that the steady-state level of an enzyme should depend on the rate of supply of the substrate.
Bone Marrow Osteoblast Damage by Chemotherapeutic Agents
Stephanie L. Rellick, Heather O'Leary, Debbie Piktel, Cheryl Walton, James E. Fortney, Stephen M. Akers, Karen H. Martin, James Denvir, Goran Boskovic, Donald A. Primerano, Jeffrey Vos, Nathanael Bailey, Marieta Gencheva, Laura F. Gibson
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030758
Abstract: Hematopoietic reconstitution, following bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, requires a microenvironment niche capable of supporting both immature progenitors and stem cells with the capacity to differentiate and expand. Osteoblasts comprise one important component of this niche. We determined that treatment of human primary osteoblasts (HOB) with melphalan or VP-16 resulted in increased phospho-Smad2, consistent with increased TGF-β1 activity. This increase was coincident with reduced HOB capacity to support immature B lineage cell chemotaxis and adherence. The supportive deficit was not limited to committed progenitor cells, as human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or human CD34+ bone marrow cells co-cultured with HOB pre-exposed to melphalan, VP-16 or rTGF-β1 had profiles distinct from the same populations co-cultured with untreated HOB. Functional support deficits were downstream of changes in HOB gene expression profiles following chemotherapy exposure. Melphalan and VP-16 induced damage of HOB suggests vulnerability of this critical niche to therapeutic agents frequently utilized in pre-transplant regimens and suggests that dose escalated chemotherapy may contribute to post-transplantation hematopoietic deficits by damaging structural components of this supportive niche.
Would school closure for the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic have been worth the cost?: a computational simulation of Pennsylvania
Shawn T Brown, Julie HY Tai, Rachel R Bailey, Philip C Cooley, William D Wheaton, Margaret A Potter, Ronald E Voorhees, Megan LeJeune, John J Grefenstette, Donald S Burke, Sarah M McGlone, Bruce Y Lee
BMC Public Health , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-353
Abstract: A combination of agent-based and Monte Carlo economic simulation modeling was used to determine the cost-benefit of closing schools (vs. not closing schools) for different durations (range: 1 to 8 weeks) and symptomatic case incidence triggers (range: 1 to 30) for the state of Pennsylvania during the 2009 H1N1 epidemic. Different scenarios varied the basic reproductive rate (R0) from 1.2, 1.6, to 2.0 and used case-hospitalization and case-fatality rates from the 2009 epidemic. Additional analyses determined the cost per influenza case averted of implementing school closure.For all scenarios explored, closing schools resulted in substantially higher net costs than not closing schools. For R0 = 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 epidemics, closing schools for 8 weeks would have resulted in median net costs of $21.0 billion (95% Range: $8.0 - $45.3 billion). The median cost per influenza case averted would have been $14,185 ($5,423 - $30,565) for R0 = 1.2, $25,253 ($9,501 - $53,461) for R0 = 1.6, and $23,483 ($8,870 - $50,926) for R0 = 2.0.Our study suggests that closing schools during the 2009 H1N1 epidemic could have resulted in substantial costs to society as the potential costs of lost productivity and childcare could have far outweighed the cost savings in preventing influenza cases.During the 2009 H1N1 influenza epidemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initially considered school closure as a mitigation intervention [1,2], and public health officials debated over whether, when, and how long to close schools [3,4]. Studies have suggested that a high degree of influenza transmission may occur in schools and sustained school closure may reduce the spread of both seasonal and epidemic influenza, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality [5-14]. However, school closure may be costly, as suggested by Sadique et al. [15] and Lempel, Hammond and Epstein [16] (an estimated $10 to $47 billion impact on the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for 4 weeks of school closure in t
Patient Participation in Communication about Treatment Decision-Making for Localized Prostate Cancer during Consultation Visits  [PDF]
Lixin Song, Mark P. Toles, Jinbing Bai, Matthew E. Nielsen, Donald E. Bailey, Betsy Sleath, Barbara Mark
Health (Health) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/health.2015.711156
Abstract: Objectives: To describe the communication behaviors of patients and physicians and patient par-ticipation in communication about treatment decision-making during consultation visits for local-ized prostate cancer (LPCa). Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from 52 men enrolled in the usual care control group of a randomized trial that focused on decision-making for newly diagnosed men with LPCa. We analyzed the patient-physician communication using the transcribed audio-recordings of real-time treatment consultations and a researcher-developed coding tool, including codes for communication behaviors (information giving, seeking, and clarifying/ verifying) and contents of clinical consultations (health histories, survival/mortality, treatment options, treatment impact, and treatment preferences). After qualitative content analysis, we categorized patient participation in communication about treatment-related clinical content, including “none” (content not discussed); “low” (patient listening only); “moderate” (patient providing information or asking questions); and “high” (patient providing information and asking questions). Results: Physicians mainly provided information during treatment decision consultations and patients frequently were not active participants in communication. The participation of patients with low and moderate cancer risk typically was: 1) “moderate and high” in discussing health histories; 2) “low” in discussing survival/mortality; 3) “low and moderate” in discussing treatment options; 4) “none and low” in discussing treatment impacts; and 5) “low” in discussing treatment preferences. Conclusions: Findings suggest opportunities for increasing patient participation in communication about treatment decision-making for LPCa during clinical consultations.
Partner violence during pregnancy: prevalence, effects, screening, and management
Beth A Bailey
International Journal of Women's Health , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S8632
Abstract: rtner violence during pregnancy: prevalence, effects, screening, and management Review (4186) Total Article Views Authors: Beth A Bailey Published Date June 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 183 - 197 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S8632 Beth A Bailey Department of Family Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA Abstract: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy. Pregnancy IPV is a significant problem worldwide, with rates varying significantly by country and maternal risk factors. Pregnancy IPV is associated with adverse newborn outcomes, including low birth weight and preterm birth. Many mechanisms for how IPV may impact birth outcomes have been proposed and include direct health, mental health, and behavioral effects, which all may interact. Screening for IPV during pregnancy is essential, yet due to time constraints and few clear recommendations for assessment, many prenatal providers do not routinely inquire about IPV, or even believe they should. More training is needed to assist health care providers in identifying and managing pregnancy IPV, with additional research needed to inform effective interventions to reduce the rates of pregnancy IPV and resultant outcomes.
Partner violence during pregnancy: prevalence, effects, screening, and management
Beth A Bailey
International Journal of Women's Health , 2010,
Abstract: Beth A BaileyDepartment of Family Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy. Pregnancy IPV is a significant problem worldwide, with rates varying significantly by country and maternal risk factors. Pregnancy IPV is associated with adverse newborn outcomes, including low birth weight and preterm birth. Many mechanisms for how IPV may impact birth outcomes have been proposed and include direct health, mental health, and behavioral effects, which all may interact. Screening for IPV during pregnancy is essential, yet due to time constraints and few clear recommendations for assessment, many prenatal providers do not routinely inquire about IPV, or even believe they should. More training is needed to assist health care providers in identifying and managing pregnancy IPV, with additional research needed to inform effective interventions to reduce the rates of pregnancy IPV and resultant outcomes.Keywords: intimate partner violence, pregnancy, pregnancy screening, pregnancy risks
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