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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 7003 matches for " Diego Sangiorgi "
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Can a course modify the quality of triage in ER?
Nicola Parenti,Andrea Zardi,Roberta Manfredi,Diego Sangiorgi
Emergency Care Journal , 2009, DOI: 10.4081/ecj.2009.3.16
Abstract: All international Societies of Emergency Medicine have developed and promote courses on triage methods and guidelines, given their fundamental role in improving initial evaluation of patients in Emergency Department settings. However, as far as we know, few studies analyse the effect of triage courses on the allocation of priority codes. Since 2001, the Intra-Hospital Triage Guidelines have been implemented in Imola, where they are disseminated and illustrated in two-day courses. In this study, we analysed the effect of a two-day triage course on the quality of priority code allocation to patients evaluated at our ER. The Triage Guidelines course appears to improve two of the quality indicators analysed: observance of documentation standards and compliance with Triage Guidelines.
Reliability and effectiveness of a 4-level emergency triage
Nicola Parenti,Maria Letizia Bacchi Reggiani,Diego Sangiorgi,Tiziano Lenzi
Emergency Care Journal , 2008, DOI: 10.4081/ecj.2008.5.30
Abstract: Italian guidelines require a 4-level in hospital triage based on an acuity scale measurement, but they don’t suggest common guidelines neither which triage models to adopt. Thus each hospital developed own triage guidelines based on consensus. But, to our knowledge, there aren’t data on the reliability and predictive validity of triage systems adopted by Italian Emergency Department. Also in the ED of Imola, a triage working group developed Guidelines on triage in 2001. In this study we measured the reliability and predictive validity of the Imola Triage Guidelines (LGTI).
Natural Breeding Places for Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in a Semiarid Region of Bahia State, Brazil
Bruno Sangiorgi,Daniel Neves Miranda,Diego Ferreira Oliveira,Edivaldo Passos Santos,Fernanda Regis Gomes,Edna Oliveira Santos,Aldina Barral,José Carlos Miranda
Journal of Tropical Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/124068
Abstract: Few microhabitats have been previously identified as natural breeding places for phlebotomine sand flies so far, and little is known about the influence of climate variables in their density. The present study was conducted in a dry region with a semiarid climate, where visceral leishmaniasis occurs in humans and dogs. The occurrence of breeding places in specific microhabitats was investigated in soil samples collected from five houses, which were also the location used for sampling of adults. All the microhabitats sampled by our study were identified as natural breeding places due to the occurrence of immature forms of sand flies. On a weekly basis, the number of adult sand flies captured was positively correlated with the mean temperature from preceding weeks. These results, in addition to promoting an advance in the knowledge of sand flies biology, may furnish a tool for optimizing the control of the sand flies, by indicating the most suitable periods and microhabitats for the application of insecticides. 1. Introduction Despite the medical importance of leishmaniasis, little is known about the natural breeding places of its vectors. Most previous attempts to identify the preferred microhabitats for the oviposition of sand flies in the Neotropical region have produced disappointing yields, resulting in a small number of positive soil samples and immature forms [1–4]. Some recent studies (e.g., Alencar [5] and Singh [6]), however, have successfully obtained high amounts of immature forms due to the sampling of suitable places for larval development. As observed by Newstead [7], the immature forms of sand flies are more concentrated in microhabitats that exhibited specific conditions, as the presence of organic matter, humidity, and low levels of light. Studies conducted in rain forests (e.g., Hanson [8], Alencar et al. [5]) corroborate these observations, as shown by the greater numbers of immature forms found in soil with litter, between roots and under fallen trunks. Similar edaphic conditions, although in different microhabitats such as soil cracks, have also been observed in studies conducted at regions with dry climates (e.g., Deane and M. P. Deane [9], Ferreira et al. [1]), to be more likely to find immature forms of sand flies. Dry climate regions experience more pronounced climatic variations than regions with humid climates typical of rain forests, so the density of vectors may exhibit different characteristics as well. Studies conducted in rain forest regions (e.g., Hanson [8], Dias-Lima et al. [10]) observed high densities of vectors
Light Logics and Higher-Order Processes
Ugo Dal Lago,Simone Martini,Davide Sangiorgi
Electronic Proceedings in Theoretical Computer Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4204/eptcs.41.4
Abstract: We show that the techniques for resource control that have been developed in the so-called "light logics" can be fruitfully applied also to process algebras. In particular, we present a restriction of Higher-Order pi-calculus inspired by Soft Linear Logic. We prove that any soft process terminates in polynomial time. We argue that the class of soft processes may be naturally enlarged so that interesting processes are expressible, still maintaining the polynomial bound on executions.
On the Expressiveness of the Ambient Logic
Daniel Hirschkoff,Etienne Lozes,Davide Sangiorgi
Computer Science , 2005, DOI: 10.2168/LMCS-2(2:3)2006
Abstract: The Ambient Logic (AL) has been proposed for expressing properties of process mobility in the calculus of Mobile Ambients (MA), and as a basis for query languages on semistructured data. In this paper, we study the expressiveness of AL. We define formulas for capabilities and for communication in MA. We also derive some formulas that capture finitess of a term, name occurrences and persistence. We study extensions of the calculus involving more complex forms of communications, and we define characteristic formulas for the equivalence induced by the logic on a subcalculus of MA. This subcalculus is defined by imposing an image-finiteness condition on the reducts of a MA process.
On Coinductive Equivalences for Higher-Order Probabilistic Functional Programs (Long Version)
Ugo Dal Lago,Davide Sangiorgi,Michele Alberti
Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract: We study bisimulation and context equivalence in a probabilistic $\lambda$-calculus. The contributions of this paper are threefold. Firstly we show a technique for proving congruence of probabilistic applicative bisimilarity. While the technique follows Howe's method, some of the technicalities are quite different, relying on non-trivial "disentangling" properties for sets of real numbers. Secondly we show that, while bisimilarity is in general strictly finer than context equivalence, coincidence between the two relations is attained on pure $\lambda$-terms. The resulting equality is that induced by Levy-Longo trees, generally accepted as the finest extensional equivalence on pure $\lambda$-terms under a lazy regime. Finally, we derive a coinductive characterisation of context equivalence on the whole probabilistic language, via an extension in which terms akin to distributions may appear in redex position. Another motivation for the extension is that its operational semantics allows us to experiment with a different congruence technique, namely that of logical bisimilarity.
Light Logics and Higher-Order Processes
Ugo Dal Lago,Simone Martini,Davide Sangiorgi
Computer Science , 2010, DOI: 10.1017/S0960129514000310
Abstract: We show that the techniques for resource control that have been developed in the so-called "light logics" can be fruitfully applied also to process algebras. In particular, we present a restriction of Higher-Order pi-calculus inspired by Soft Linear Logic. We prove that any soft process terminates in polynomial time. We argue that the class of soft processes may be naturally enlarged so that interesting processes are expressible, still maintaining the polynomial bound on executions.
Separability in the Ambient Logic
Daniel Hirschkoff,Etienne Lozes,Davide Sangiorgi
Computer Science , 2008, DOI: 10.2168/LMCS-4(3:4)2008
Abstract: The \it{Ambient Logic} (AL) has been proposed for expressing properties of process mobility in the calculus of Mobile Ambients (MA), and as a basis for query languages on semistructured data. We study some basic questions concerning the discriminating power of AL, focusing on the equivalence on processes induced by the logic $(=_L>)$. As underlying calculi besides MA we consider a subcalculus in which an image-finiteness condition holds and that we prove to be Turing complete. Synchronous variants of these calculi are studied as well. In these calculi, we provide two operational characterisations of $_=L$: a coinductive one (as a form of bisimilarity) and an inductive one (based on structual properties of processes). After showing $_=L$ to be stricly finer than barbed congruence, we establish axiomatisations of $_=L$ on the subcalculus of MA (both the asynchronous and the synchronous version), enabling us to relate $_=L$ to structural congruence. We also present some (un)decidability results that are related to the above separation properties for AL: the undecidability of $_=L$ on MA and its decidability on the subcalculus.
GH treatment, BMI and different genotypes in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome and scoliosis: Is there any relationship?  [PDF]
Tiziana Greggi, E. Pipitone, K. Martikos, F. Lolli, F. Vommaro, E. Maredi, M. Di Silvestre, S. Giacomini, L. Sangiorgi
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering (JBiSE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jbise.2013.611132
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to try to find a protocol defining a clinical diagnostic procedure for the patients to be admitted to the authors’ Institute to receive treatment for either suspected or confirmed diagnosis of spine deformity in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). The aim is to evaluate every subject from the diagnostic point of view, assessing variability of clinical expression and evolution of spinal deformity in the light of the related genetic aspects, thus providing a univocal protocol. The present series only includes patients (18 cases) with PWS, 7 hospitalized for surgical treatment of scoliosis, 11 followed-up at the authors’ institute only for conservative treatment of scoliosis. Both BMI tracks (weight/height2) and BMI Z-score (only for children older than 2 years) were assessed. Moreover, the GH treatment was evaluated for each group of patients as follows: being administered, suspended or no treatment. Finally, the gene was compared with BMI. No relationship was observed either between GH treatment and mean BMI or between genetics and mean BMI. More patients should be seen by the authors to confirm or refute the current findings.
Adherence in HIV-positive patients treated with single-tablet regimens and multi-pill regimens: findings from the COMPACT study
A Antinori,C Angeletti,A Ammassari,D Sangiorgi
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2012, DOI: 10.7448/ias.15.6.18098
Abstract: The use of Combination AntiRetroviral Therapy (cART) has decreased the morbidity and mortality of patients infected with HIV. However, adherence to cART remains crucial to prevent virological failure and disease progression. The aim of this study was to assess adherence to treatment among patients treated with Single Tablet Regimen (STR) or with multi-pill regimens based on Protease Inhibitors (PI), Non-Nucleoside Reverse-Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTI), or raltegravir (RAL). An observational retrospective cohort analysis based on administrative and clinical databases was conducted at the National Institute for Infectious Diseases (Rome, Italy). HIV-positive patients treated with a cART between Jan 1st, 2008–Dec 31st, 2010 were included. Patients were followed-up for one year since the first prescription during the inclusion period or up to death or switch of at least one drug of the regimen. Adherence and selective non-adherence (days without backbone or 3rd drug) were calculated using pharmacy refill compliance [1]. cART regimens were classified based on number of daily pills (STR vs multi-pill regimen) and on type of third drug. Viral Load (VL) and CD4 cell counts at the end of the follow-up were evaluated. A total of 1,604 patients were analyzed, 70.0% male, age 45.0±8.7, 14.3% newly treated. Patients on STR were 159 (9.9%), PI 878 (54.7%), NNRTI 523 (32.6%), RAL 44 (2.7%). Presence of at least one AIDS-defining conditions (according to Centers for Disease Control classification) was 30% in the STR group, 34% PI, 26% NNRTI, 34% RAL (p=n.s.). Adherence was 80.4±14.7% for STR, 71.8±21.8% PI, 77.1±20.3% NNRTI, 74.0±22.4% RAL. Selective non-adherence was 5.5% (18 days) PI, 2.8% (8 days) NNRTI, 12.5% (43 days) RAL (Figure 1). At the end of the follow-up, VL/CD4 values were available among 709 patients (44%); CD4 count >500 cell/mm3 was observed among 61% of patients on STR, 44% PI, 48% NNRTI, 42% RAL and VL < 50 copies/ml was observed among 96% of patients on STR, 78% PI, 88% NNRTI, 87% RAL. Interruptions in cART refill remain a relevant problem across all cART regimens. Patients on STR displayed a higher adherence rate compared to multi-pill regimes (PI, NNRTI, and RAL), primarily due to lack of selective non-adherence. Patients on STR experienced also higher rates of VL < 50 and CD4 > 500. The use of an STR regimen appears an effective therapeutic option to avoid selective non-adherence and, consequently, to prevent virological failure and disease progression.
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