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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 65475 matches for " Di Cave David "
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Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status
Manganelli Laura,Berrilli Federica,Di Cave David,Ercoli Lucia
Parasites & Vectors , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1756-3305-5-265
Abstract: Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15) attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15%) tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81%) out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19%) presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p<0.01). Children classified in the lower height Z-scores had a significantly greater prevalence of parasites (30.9%) than the others (p<0.01). Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.
Giardia duodenalis assemblages and Entamoeba species infecting non-human primates in an Italian zoological garden: zoonotic potential and management traits
Federica Berrilli, Cristina Prisco, Klaus G Friedrich, Pilar Di Cerbo, David Di Cave, Claudio De Liberato
Parasites & Vectors , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1756-3305-4-199
Abstract: G. duodenalis was found only in Lemur catta (47.0%). Entamoeba spp. were detected in all species studied, with the exception of Eulemur macaco and Varecia rubra. The number of positive pools ranged from 5.9% in L. catta to 81.2% in Mandrillus sphinx; in Pan troglodytes the observed prevalence was 53.6%. A mixed Entamoeba-Giardia infection was recorded only in one sample of L. catta. All G. duodenalis isolates belonged to the zoonotic assemblage B, sub assemblage BIV. Three Entamoeba species were identified: E. hartmanni, E. coli and E. dispar.Our results highlight the importance of regularly testing animals kept in zoos for the diagnosis of zoonotic parasites, in order to evaluate their pathogenic role in the housed animals and the zoonotic risk linked to their presence. A quick detection of the arrival of pathogens into the enclosures could also be a prerequisite to limit their spread into the structure via the introduction of specific control strategies. The need for molecular identification of some parasite species/genotype in order to better define the zoonotic risk is also highlighted.Protozoa are the most common parasites in captive non-human primates (NHP). Amongst others, Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. are frequently reported [1-3]; the simplicity of their monoxenous life cycle, the low infective dose and the short prepatent period facilitate their dispersal among captive animals once they have entered the enclosures (cages, pens, etc.) [4,5].The relevance of Giardia and Entamoeba infections in zoo animals goes beyond their clinical effects. From a public health point of view, these protozoa have high zoonotic potential, being among the most common intestinal human parasites worldwide [6-8]. Infected NHP in zoos constitute a risk for animal caretakers [9,10] and possibly people visiting the zoological gardens. On the other hand, infected people could be the source of infection for the captive NHP via water and/or food contamination. Hence, the epidemi
Raman Microspectroscopy Analysis in the Treatment of Acanthamoeba Keratitis
Giulia Rusciano, Paola Capriglione, Giuseppe Pesce, Salvatore Del Prete, Gilda Cennamo, David Di Cave, Luciano Cerulli, Antonio Sasso
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0072127
Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis is a rare but serious corneal disease, often observed in contact lens wearers. Clinical treatment of infected patients frequently involves the use of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), a polymer used as a disinfectant and antiseptic, which is toxic also for the epithelial cells of the cornea. Prompt and effective diagnostic tools are hence highly desiderable for both starting early therapy and timely suspension of the treatment. In this work we use Raman microspectroscopy to analyse in vitro a single Acanthamoeba cell in cystic phase. In particular, we investigate the effect of PHMB at the single-cell level, providing useful information on both the underlying biochemical mechanism and the time frame for Acanthamoeba eradication in ocular infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy, in conjunction with standard multivariate analysis methods, allows discriminating between live and dead Acanthamoebas, which is fundamental to optimizing patients’ treatment.
Paediatric amitriptyline overdose  [PDF]
Steve Doherty, Grant Cave, Martyn Harvey
Open Journal of Pediatrics (OJPed) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojped.2012.22028
Abstract: We report a near fatal case of paediatric amitriptyline overdose including a series of ECGs demonstrating the effects of sodium bicarbonate therapy on cardio-toxicity. We briefly discuss the role of sodium to counteract the sodium channel blockade of tricyclic antidepressants and discuss the possible utility of lipid emulsion therapy in such cases.
Case report: successful lipid resuscitation in multi-drug overdose with predominant tricyclic antidepressant toxidrome
Martyn Harvey, Grant Cave
International Journal of Emergency Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1865-1380-5-8
Abstract: Therapeutic use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) in the arrested patient secondary to lipophilic cardiotoxin overdose is increasingly reported, with numerous documented cases of successful resuscitation outcome [1,2]. Clinical experience with lipid rescue resuscitation, coupled with a dearth of reported adverse sequelae attributable to ILE administration, has more recently seen use of lipid emulsions extend beyond that of overt cardiac arrest to instances of lesser degrees of lipophilic-toxin-induced haemodynamic instability.Few data exist, however, to guide the physician contemplating ILE use in the deteriorating patient when multiple therapeutic options remain yet untried. Specifically, the role of ILE in hemodynamic instability secondary to tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdose has been the subject of few pre-clinical studies [3,4]. We report a case of multi-drug overdose with predominant TCA toxicity that exhibited ongoing hypotension after systemic alkalinisation, yet before infusion of vasopressor medications, which responded to ILE loading.A 51-year-old 75-kg man with a background history of ischaemic heart disease, chronic back pain, and depression ingested amitriptyline in excess of 43 mg/kg (> 65 × 50-mg tablets) and unknown quantities of quetiapine, citalopram, metoprolol, quinapril, and aspirin in a deliberate act of self-poisoning. At ambulance arrival (time approximately 40 min after ingestion) he was agitated and poorly co-operative, with a heart rate of 160 bpm and blood pressure 100/70. En route to hospital he became unresponsive and then suffered a generalised seizure, which was terminated with 4 mg intravenous midazolam. On arrival to our tertiary care facility (time 60 min following ingestion), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was three, temperature was 37.6°C, pupils were dilated (4 mm), heart rate was 150 beats per minute, blood pressure was 112/82 mmHg, and serum glucose 14.0 mmoll-1. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG; Figure 1) revealed
Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton
Cave AJ, Parameswaran L
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S18747
Abstract: mprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton Original Research (2698) Total Article Views Authors: Cave AJ, Parameswaran L Published Date May 2011 Volume 2011:2 Pages 127 - 138 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S18747 Andrew J Cave1, Lakshmi Parameswaran2 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Introduction: The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going? Methods: A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively. Results: Academic physicians’ practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years. Conclusion: General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians.
Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton
Cave AJ,Parameswaran L
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2011,
Abstract: Andrew J Cave1, Lakshmi Parameswaran21Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandIntroduction: The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going?Methods: A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively.Results: Academic physicians’ practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years.Conclusion: General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians.Keywords: comprehensiveness, primary care, education
Hypothesis: the research page. Participatory action research.
Cave AJ,Ramsden VR
Canadian Family Physician , 2002,
Abstract:
Embeddings of locally compact hyperbolic groups into Lp-spaces
Dennis Dreesen,Chris Cave
Mathematics , 2013,
Abstract: In the last years, there has been a large amount of research on embeddability properties of finitely generated hyperbolic groups. In this paper, we elaborate on the more general class of locally compact hyperbolic groups. We compute the equivariant $L_p$-compression in a number of locally compact examples, such as the groups $SO(n,1)$: by proving that the equivariant $L_p$-compression of a locally compact compactly generated group is minimal for $p=2$, we calculate all equivariant $L_p$-compressions of $SO(n,1)$. Next, we show that although there are locally compact, non-discrete hyperbolic groups $G$ with Kazhdan's property ($T$), it is true that any locally compact hyperbolic group admits a proper affine isometric action on an $L_p$-space for $p$ larger than the Ahlfors regular conformal dimension of $\partial G$. This answers a question asked by Yves de Cornulier. Finally, we elaborate on the locally compact version of property $(A)$ and show that, as in the discrete case, a locally compact second countable group has property (A) if its non-equivariant compression is greater than 1/2.
Equivariant compression of certain direct limit groups and amalgamated free products
Chris Cave,Dennis Dreesen
Mathematics , 2013,
Abstract: We give a means of estimating the equivariant compression of a group G in terms of properties of open subgroups G_i whose direct limit is G. Quantifying a result by S.R. Gal, we also study the behaviour of the equivariant compression under amalgamated free products G1*_H G2 where H is of finite index in both G_1 and G_2.
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