oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 81 )

2018 ( 499 )

2017 ( 521 )

2016 ( 691 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 304205 matches for " D.K. Essumang* "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /304205
Display every page Item
Levels of arsenic in human hair as biomarkers of arsenic exposure in a mining community in Ghana
D.K. Essumang
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2009,
Abstract: Arsenic levels were determined in human hair samples collected from a mining and non-mining community in Ghana. Hair samples were digested and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP AES). Elevated levels of arsenic were found in the samples obtained from the mining community, the mean levels in the hair ranged from 0.0142 0.0515 μg/g, whereas arsenic was not detected in the hair samples from the non-mining community. The values obtained from the mining community were all below background levels set by the Agency for Toxic Substance and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The results therefore indicate that arsenic pollution may indeed be associated with mining, inducing human environmental exposure.
ANALYSIS OF VEHICULAR FALLOUTS FROM TRAFFIC IN THE KUMASI METROPOLIS, GHANA
D.K. Essumang*, D.K. Dodoo, S. Obiri, B.A.K. Oduro
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2006,
Abstract: Concentrations of platinum, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in dust from areas of high, medium, low and very low vehicular movements in Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of the Republic of Ghana was measured. High concentrations of platinum, lead, copper, and zinc were found to be associated with soils from areas of high traffic densities suggesting that vehicles (that ply these areas) also contribute heavy metals to the environment. The results of the study shows that the road and users, like residents living in buildings within these areas, those engaged in commercial activities like hawking, and the general public are at risk of exposure to the toxic effects of Pt, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn as they inhale those metals released from the exhaust of vehicles into the environment. According to these results, there is the potential for exposure to high levels of Pt, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn for road users and those living in urban environments or along the highways. KEY WORDS: Catalytic converter, Vehicular fallouts, Toxic metals, High, Medium, Low and Very low traffic conditions, Kumasi Metropolis (Ghana). Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2006, 20(1), 9-15.
Lindane and propuxur residues in the top soils of some cocoa growing areas in five districts of the Central Region of Ghana
J.K. Bentum, D.K. Essumang, D.K. Dodoo
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2006,
Abstract: Lindane and propoxur residues in some topsoil samples from five cocoa growing districts in the Central Region of Ghana have been determined. Ten soil samples were taken randomly at a depth of 0-10 cm from pre-selected farms in each district. Some physical and chemical properties of the soils were determined. The pesticide residues were extracted from 50 g of topsoil by continuous Soxhlet extraction using a (1:1 v/v) acetone-chloroform mixture for six hours. Clean up of the extract was done by liquid-liquid partitioning and column chromatography using alumina and silica gel adsorbents. The pesticide residues were finally analysed by gas- chromatography using 63Ni electron capture detector (ECD) and flame ionization detector (FID) for lindane and propoxur, respectively. Lindane and propoxur pesticide residues were found to be present in all the soils to which these pesticides had already been applied. Generally, lindane residues occurred in greater amounts than propoxur. The concentrations of lindane ranged from 2.1 to 15.4 mg kg-1 and propoxur from 1.71 to 7.95 mg kg-1. Both the extracted lindane and propoxur residues correlated negatively with pH, cation exchange capacity, moisture content, and organic carbon. Propoxur correlated positively with the amount of clay but there was no significant correlation between the amount of clay and the extracted lindane concentration. KEY WORDS: Lindane, Propoxur, Soil, Pesticide monitoring Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2006, 20(2), 193-199.
Analysis of vehicular fallouts from traffic in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana
D.K. Essumang,D.K. Dodoo,S. Obiri,B.A.K. Oduro
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2006,
Abstract: Concentrations of platinum, lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in dust from areas of high, medium, low and very low vehicular movements in Kumasi Metropolis in the Ashanti Region of the Republic of Ghana was measured. High concentrations of platinum, lead, copper, and zinc were found to be associated with soils from areas of high traffic densities suggesting that vehicles (that ply these areas) also contribute heavy metals to the environment. The results of the study shows that the road and users, like residents living in buildings within these areas, those engaged in commercial activities like hawking, and the general public are at risk of exposure to the toxic effects of Pt, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn as they inhale those metals released from the exhaust of vehicles into the environment. According to these results, there is the potential for exposure to high levels of Pt, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn for road users and those living in urban environments or along the highways.
DETERMINATION OF FREE CYANIDE AND TOTAL CYANIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN SURFACE AND UNDERGROUND WATERS IN BOGOSO AND ITS SURROUNDING AREAS IN GHANA
S. Obiri, D.K. Dodoo, F. Okai-Sam, D.K. Essumang
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2007,
Abstract: Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide in water samples in Bogoso and its surrounding areas in Ghana have been measured in this study. Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide were found to be above the maximum permissible discharge limit of effluent from mining companies into natural waters set by Environmental Protection Agency, Ghana (GEPA). A comparison of the results obtained in this study with permissible levels set by US Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization reveals that surface waters in the study areas are highly polluted with cyanide and it's not safe for human consumptions. This means that, the resident in and around Bogoso are at risk. KEY WORDS: Free cyanide, Total cyanide, River Bogo, River Aprepre (River Dumasi), River Ankobra Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2007, 21(2), 213-220.
Determination of free cyanide and total cyanide concentrations in surface and underground waters in Bogoso and its surrounding areas in Ghana
S. Obiri,D.K. Dodoo,F. Okai-Sam,D.K. Essumang
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2007,
Abstract: Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide in water samples in Bogoso and its surrounding areas in Ghana have been measured in this study. Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide were found to be above the maximum permissible discharge limit of effluent from mining companies into natural waters set by Environmental Protection Agency, Ghana (GEPA). A comparison of the results obtained in this study with permissible levels set by US Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization reveals that surface waters in the study areas are highly polluted with cyanide and it's not safe for human consumptions. This means that, the resident in and around Bogoso are at risk.
PESTICIDE RESIDUES IN THE WATER AND FISH (LAGOON TILAPIA) SAMPLES FROM LAGOONS IN GHANA
D.K. Essumang, G.K. Togoh, L. Chokky
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2009,
Abstract: This study was to ascertain the presence and subsequent amount of four organochlorine pesticides: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (2,4'-DDE), 4,4'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (4,4'-DDD), p,p'-dichloro- diphenyltrichloroethane [p,p'-DDT (r) (i) (f)] and Propiconazol (f); and four organophosphorous pesticides: Fenitrothion (i), Chlorpyrifos (i), Dichlorvos (a) (i) and Diazinon (a) (i) in Chemu lagoon (Tema), Korle lagoon (Accra), Fosu lagoon (Cape Coast) and the Etsii lagoon (Abandzi). Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid extraction technique was employed to extract pesticide residues in water and fish samples, respectively, using 1:1 (v/v) ethyl acetate/dichloromethane mixture before being analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest level of pesticide contaminations was recorded in the Chemu lagoon as compared to the Korle lagoon and Fosu lagoon, with the Etsii lagoon showing the least contamination. The total average pesticide residues in water samples from the four lagoons: Chemu, Korle, Fosu and Etsii are 2.6384 mg/L, 0.4992 mg/L, 0.3045 mg/L and 1.3629 mg/L, respectively. The total average pesticide residues obtained in fish samples (Sarotherodon melaanothern) from the Fosu and Etsii lagoons are 0.0155 mg/kg and 0.0088 mg/kg, respectively. This shows some level of exposure of pesticide which would be harmful to human. KEY WORDS: Oraganochlorine, Organophosphorous, 2,4'-DDE, 4,4'-DDD, p,p'-DDT (r) (i) (f), Propiconazol (f), Fenitrothion (i), Chlorpyrifos (i), Dichlorvos (a) (i), Diazinon (a) (i), Chemu lagoon, Sarotherodon melaanothern Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2009, 23(1), 19-27.
Pesticide residues in the water and fish (lagoon tilapia) samples from lagoons in Ghana
D.K. Essumang,G.K. Togoh,L. Chokky
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2009,
Abstract: This study was to ascertain the presence and subsequent amount of four organochlorine pesticides: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (2,4’-DDE), 4,4’-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (4,4’-DDD), p,p’-dichloro- diphenyltrichloroethane [p,p’-DDT (r) (i) (f)] and Propiconazol (f); and four organophosphorous pesticides: Fenitrothion (i), Chlorpyrifos (i), Dichlorvos (a) (i) and Diazinon (a) (i) in Chemu lagoon (Tema), Korle lagoon (Accra), Fosu lagoon (Cape Coast) and the Etsii lagoon (Abandzi). Liquid-liquid and liquid-solid extraction technique was employed to extract pesticide residues in water and fish samples, respectively, using 1:1 (v/v) ethyl acetate/dichloromethane mixture before being analyzed by gas chromatography. The highest level of pesticide contaminations was recorded in the Chemu lagoon as compared to the Korle lagoon and Fosu lagoon, with the Etsii lagoon showing the least contamination. The total average pesticide residues in water samples from the four lagoons: Chemu, Korle, Fosu and Etsii are 2.6384 mg/L, 0.4992 mg/L, 0.3045 mg/L and 1.3629 mg/L, respectively. The total average pesticide residues obtained in fish samples (Sarotherodon melaanothern) from the Fosu and Etsii lagoons are 0.0155 mg/kg and 0.0088 mg/kg, respectively. This shows some level of exposure of pesticide which would be harmful to human.
SOME CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RIVER PRA ESTUARY IN THE WESTERN REGION OF GHANA
J.K. Tufuor, D.K. Dodoo, A.K. Armah, G.A. Darpaah, D.K. Essumang
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia , 2007,
Abstract: This paper discusses the nutrients budget and transfers of mineral nutrients from land to the sea that influence significantly the biogeochemical process operating in the coastal ecosystem. Water samples were collected fortnightly from six sites in the estuary and analysed using standard methods of analyses. It was observed that the estuary is alkaline in nature and the alkalinity increases, in the lower reach of the river as it flowed into the sea. The estuary could be classified as a well-mixed estuary due to the vertical homogenous distribution of salinity. The inorganic nitrogen in the water body exists predominately in the form of nitrate (NO3-), as compared to concentrations of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrite (NO2-). The ranges of NO3-, NH4+ and NO2- concentrations are (4.98-8.27), (0.11-0.46) and (0.005-10.95) x 10-3 mg/L. The concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and phosphate were found to be within WHO specification. The calculated residual flow (VR) for both November and December are -2.7 x 107 m3 day-1and -1.01 x 107 m3 day-1, respectively. The negative value of VR implies that water flows from the system. The corresponding residence and flush times are 324 and 109 seconds and 828 and 595.2 seconds for November and December, respectively. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2007, 21(3), 341-348.
Assessment of Levels of Cadmium and Mercury of Two Estuaries in Two Regions of Ghana
A. Sam,D.K. Dodoo,D.K. Essumang,C.K. Adokoh,G. Doe Nutifafa,Y. Ameyaw
Research Journal of Applied Sciences , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjasci.2010.40.46
Abstract: Instrumental Neutron Analysis by Americium-Beryllium radioisotope neutron source was employed for the determination of mercury and cadmium from eight different sites of the Pra and Ayensu estuaries in Ghana. Mercury and cadmium were identified in μg g-1 levels and values correlated with the pH values of water column and soil samples. Substrates like the Blue Tilapia and the European Green Crab were used as bioaccumulation indicators for the mercury levels in the various samples. A summary of the mean, minimum and maximum soil/water mercury and cadmium concentrations detected for the 8 sites with the widest geographical distribution; river bank at Beposo showed a maximum of 3.95x10 3 μg g-1 of mercury which is far below the Environmental Protection Agency s permissible limit of 0.134 μg g-1. Insignificantly low levels of mercury concentrations were analyzed in shoulder soils and water samples over the period of the study. A significantly high levels of concentrations of mercury existed in the riverbed sediments as compared to that for the riverbank sediments, water and the shoulder soils. The degree of concentrations of mercury showed that mercury and cadmium concentrations decreased significantly and gradually as one moved from Beposo to the Shama beach through Bosomdo and Krobo. Mercury and Cadmium residues were also recorded in both European green Crab and blue tilapia. The levels of the two elements were slightly high in the Crab as compared to the Blue Tilapia. The differences could be attributed to the fact that the Crab is a bottom-dweller and predator. The concentrations of the two elements were far below the world permissible levels.
Page 1 /304205
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.