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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 191544 matches for " D. Meyers "
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Flagship Memorial: An Analysis of Themes at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial: 1982-2007
Leslie D. Meyers
Sociation Today , 2012,
Abstract: This paper seeks to extend the analysis of Wagner-Pacifici and Schwartz’s (1991) landmark piece, “The Vietnam Veterans Memorial: Commemorating a Difficult Past”, by sixteen years in order to understand how memory has been both created and sustained at the memorial from 1982-2007. A content analysis of 791 articles from the New York Times and Washington Post revealed five themes for analysis: 1) healing, 2) politics, 3) conflict over additional elements, 4) religion, and 5) offerings. Of these themes, politics was significant. However, while the analysis indicates the Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a politically charged terrain; grassroots efforts dominate narratives of public opinion, changes to the site and discussions of memory.
Evolution of Genetic Potential
Lauren Ancel Meyers ,Fredric D Ancel,Michael Lachmann
PLOS Computational Biology , 2005, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.0010032
Abstract: Organisms employ a multitude of strategies to cope with the dynamical environments in which they live. Homeostasis and physiological plasticity buffer changes within the lifetime of an organism, while stochastic developmental programs and hypermutability track changes on longer timescales. An alternative long-term mechanism is “genetic potential”—a heightened sensitivity to the effects of mutation that facilitates rapid evolution to novel states. Using a transparent mathematical model, we illustrate the concept of genetic potential and show that as environmental variability decreases, the evolving population reaches three distinct steady state conditions: (1) organismal flexibility, (2) genetic potential, and (3) genetic robustness. As a specific example of this concept we examine fluctuating selection for hydrophobicity in a single amino acid. We see the same three stages, suggesting that environmental fluctuations can produce allele distributions that are distinct not only from those found under constant conditions, but also from the transient allele distributions that arise under isolated selective sweeps.
Evolution of genetic potential.
Ancel Meyers Lauren,Ancel Fredric D,Lachmann Michael
PLOS Computational Biology , 2005,
Abstract: Organisms employ a multitude of strategies to cope with the dynamical environments in which they live. Homeostasis and physiological plasticity buffer changes within the lifetime of an organism, while stochastic developmental programs and hypermutability track changes on longer timescales. An alternative long-term mechanism is "genetic potential"-a heightened sensitivity to the effects of mutation that facilitates rapid evolution to novel states. Using a transparent mathematical model, we illustrate the concept of genetic potential and show that as environmental variability decreases, the evolving population reaches three distinct steady state conditions: (1) organismal flexibility, (2) genetic potential, and (3) genetic robustness. As a specific example of this concept we examine fluctuating selection for hydrophobicity in a single amino acid. We see the same three stages, suggesting that environmental fluctuations can produce allele distributions that are distinct not only from those found under constant conditions, but also from the transient allele distributions that arise under isolated selective sweeps.
Revisiting normal perfusion pressure breakthrough in light of hemorrhage-induced vasospasm
Matthew D Alexander, E Sander Connolly , Philip M Meyers
World Journal of Radiology , 2010,
Abstract: Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) have abnormally enlarged arteries and veins prone to spontaneous hemorrhage. Immediately following surgical excision of a cerebral AVM, even normal brain tissue surrounding the lesion is subject to hemorrhage, a phenomenon termed normal perfusion pressure breakthrough (NPPB) syndrome. According to this theory, arteries supplying cerebral AVMs become dilated and lose their capacity to dilate or constrict to autoregulate pressure. Acutely after removal of a cerebral AVM, excessive blood pressure in these arterial feeders can cause normal brain tissue to bleed. However, this theory remains controversial. We present a patient with a cerebral AVM that demonstrated cerebrovascular reactivity and argues against an assumption underlying the theory of NPPB syndrome.
Fractal trajectories in a numerical model of the upper Indian Ocean
S. D. Meyers,J. F. Magnan,J. J. O'Brien
Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (NPG) , 1994,
Abstract: A wind-driven numerical model of the Indian Ocean is used to examine the horizontal statistics of hundreds of passive tracers spread evenly over the model domain. The distribution covers several dynamically distinct regions, revealing a variety of Lagrangian behaviours associated with different geographic locations. In particular, a cluster of trajectories with scaling dimension as large as 1.3 exists throughout the equatorial zone. Spectral analysis of trajectory displacements indicates mixed Rossby-gravity waves are involved in the production of some fractal trajectories.
Review of Helen Kraus, Gender Issues in Ancient and Reformation Translations of Genesis 1-4, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2011
Carol Meyers
Religion and Gender , 2012,
Abstract:
Surface superconducting states and paramagnetism in mesoscopic superconductors
C. Meyers
Physics , 2002, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.68.104522
Abstract: In the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau equation, the temperature dependence of the upper critical field of small ring-like superconductors is studied. At equilibrium small parts of the phase diagram show paramagnetism for width / radius ratios below 0.85. Their number and extension increase with the size of the hole. In these regions, only the inner part of the ring shows a positive magnetic moment. The order parameter density profile appears to change, when crossing a first order transition line, which separates different angular momentum values, and we clarify the relationship between the localization of superconductivity nucleation and paramagnetism of those samples.
Non-Gaussian Correlations Outside the Horizon in Local Thermal Equilibrium
Joel Meyers
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: Making a connection between observations of cosmological correlation functions and those calculated from theories of the early universe requires that these quantities are conserved through the periods of the universe which we do not understand. In this paper, the results of [0810.2831] are extended to show that tree-approximation correlation functions of Heisenberg picture operators for the reduced spatial metric are constant outside the horizon during local thermal equilibrium with no non-zero conserved quantum numbers.
Transmission of Infectious Diseases En Route to Habitat Hotspots
Julio Benavides, Peter D. Walsh, Lauren Ancel Meyers, Michel Raymond, Damien Caillaud
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031290
Abstract: Background The spread of infectious diseases in wildlife populations is influenced by patterns of between-host contacts. Habitat “hotspots” - places attracting a large numbers of individuals or social groups - can significantly alter contact patterns and, hence, disease propagation. Research on the importance of habitat hotspots in wildlife epidemiology has primarily focused on how inter-individual contacts occurring at the hotspot itself increase disease transmission. However, in territorial animals, epidemiologically important contacts may primarily occur as animals cross through territories of conspecifics en route to habitat hotspots. So far, the phenomenon has received little attention. Here, we investigate the importance of these contacts in the case where infectious individuals keep visiting the hotspots and in the case where these individuals are not able to travel to the hotspot any more. Methodology and Principal Findings We developed a simulation epidemiological model to investigate both cases in a scenario when transmission at the hotspot does not occur. We find that (i) hotspots still exacerbate epidemics, (ii) when infectious individuals do not travel to the hotspot, the most vulnerable individuals are those residing at intermediate distances from the hotspot rather than nearby, and (iii) the epidemiological vulnerability of a population is the highest when the number of hotspots is intermediate. Conclusions and Significance By altering animal movements in their vicinity, habitat hotspots can thus strongly increase the spread of infectious diseases, even when disease transmission does not occur at the hotspot itself. Interestingly, when animals only visit the nearest hotspot, creating additional artificial hotspots, rather than reducing their number, may be an efficient disease control measure.
Differentiation-Dependent Interpentameric Disulfide Bond Stabilizes Native Human Papillomavirus Type 16
Michael J. Conway, Linda Cruz, Samina Alam, Neil D. Christensen, Craig Meyers
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022427
Abstract: Genetic and biochemical analyses of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) capsids have shown that certain conserved L1 cysteine residues are critical for capsid assembly, integrity, and maturation. Since previous studies utilized HPV capsids produced in monolayer culture-based protein expression systems, the ascribed roles for these cysteine residues were not placed in the temporal context of the natural host environment for HPV, stratifying and differentiating human tissue. Here we extend upon previous observation, that HPV16 capsids mature and become stabilized over time (10-day to 20-day) in a naturally occurring tissue-spanning redox gradient, by identifying temporal roles for individual L1 cysteine residues. Specifically, the C175S substitution severely undermined wild-type titers of the virus within both 10 and 20-day tissue, while C428S, C185S, and C175,185S substitutions severely undermined wild-type titers only within 20-day tissue. All mutations led to 20-day virions that were less stable than wild-type and failed to form L1 multimers via nonreducing SDS-PAGE. Furthermore, Optiprep-fractionated 20-day C428S, C175S, and C175,185S capsids appeared permeable to endonucleases in comparison to wild-type and C185S capsids. Exposure to an oxidizing environment failed to enhance infectious titers of any of the cysteine mutants over time as with wild-type. Introduction of these cys mutants results in failure of the virus to mature.
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