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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 528319 matches for " D. M. Kaplan "
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MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment
Kaplan, D. M.;Long, K.
High Energy Physics - Phenomenology , 2007,
Abstract: Muon storage rings have been proposed for use as a source of high-energy neutrino beams (the Neutrino Factory) and as the basis for a high-energy lepton-antilepton collider (the Muon Collider). The Neutrino Factory is widely believed to be the machine of choice for the search for leptonic CP violation while the Muon Collider may prove to be the most practical route to multi-TeV lepton-antilepton collisions. The baseline conceptual designs for each of these facilities requires the phase-space compression (cooling) of the muon beams prior to acceleration. The short muon lifetime makes it impossible to employ traditional techniques to cool the beam while maintaining the muon-beam intensity. Ionization cooling, a process in which the muon beam is passed through a series of liquid-hydrogen absorbers followed by accelerating RF cavities, is the technique proposed to cool the muon beam. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) collaboration will carry out a systematic study of ionization cooling. The MICE experiment, which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, will begin to take data late this year. The MICE cooling channel, the instrumentation and the implementation at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described together with the predicted performance of the channel and the measurements that will be made.
MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment
D. M. Kaplan,K. Long
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: Muon storage rings have been proposed for use as a source of high-energy neutrino beams (the Neutrino Factory) and as the basis for a high-energy lepton-antilepton collider (the Muon Collider). The Neutrino Factory is widely believed to be the machine of choice for the search for leptonic CP violation while the Muon Collider may prove to be the most practical route to multi-TeV lepton-antilepton collisions. The baseline conceptual designs for each of these facilities requires the phase-space compression (cooling) of the muon beams prior to acceleration. The short muon lifetime makes it impossible to employ traditional techniques to cool the beam while maintaining the muon-beam intensity. Ionization cooling, a process in which the muon beam is passed through a series of liquid-hydrogen absorbers followed by accelerating RF cavities, is the technique proposed to cool the muon beam. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) collaboration will carry out a systematic study of ionization cooling. The MICE experiment, which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, will begin to take data late this year. The MICE cooling channel, the instrumentation and the implementation at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described together with the predicted performance of the channel and the measurements that will be made.
Utilidad de los antagonistas de los receptores muscarínicos en el tratamiento de los varones con síntomas del tracto urinario inferior secundarios a HBP
Steven,A.; Kaplan,M.D.;
Actas Urológicas Espa?olas , 2007, DOI: 10.4321/S0210-48062007000200003
Abstract: use of antimuscarinic agents in male patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (luts) secondaryto benign prostatic hyperplasia (bph) and with symptoms of overactive bladder (oab) has become increasingly relevant over the last few years. prescription of these drugs is in conflict with a long-established concept learnt in medical school: antimuscarinics are contraindicated in patients with bph. several factors, however, have placed this issue under constant review. the description of oab syndrome and the scientific research carried out over recent years have provided epidemiological and pathophysiological data worthwhile reviewing, most importantly in order to understand why a review of such a solidly established concept has been raised. this paper reviews the prevalence of oab in men with bph, the role of urodynamics to evaluate men with oab and the existing evidence on the effectantimuscarinics have in terms of efficacy and safety on male patients with detrusor obstruction and overactivity.
Dynamics of vegetation development on drained peat soils of the Hula Valley, Israel
Z. Henkin,M. Walczak,D. Kaplan
Mires and Peat , 2011,
Abstract: Lake Hula and its neighbouring peatland in the upper Galilee, Israel were drained during the 1950s. For about 40 years after drainage most of the area was under continuous intensive cultivation with rain-fed winter crops and irrigated summer crops. In 1994 an area of about 110 ha of mainly peat soil was re-flooded and 350 ha surrounding it were partly taken out of intensive agricultural use. The surrounding area was still cultivated under rain-fed conditions in the cool winter season, but left fallow during the hot, dry summer. The summer vegetation was mowed periodically to promote the development of a continuous sward cover for recreation and control of wind erosion. The goal of this research was to study the relationship between dynamic changes in the soil and water conditions and the composition and species distribution of the spontaneous summer vegetation. During four consecutive years the vegetation dynamics were characterised by increasing dominance of Cynodon dactylon and Sorghum halepense. Cyperus rotundus, which was common under irrigated cultivation, partly disappeared under the new non-irrigated regime. The density and growth rate of the vegetation mainly reflected differences in the water table depth, which varied between 0.5 m and 3 m. Three years after re-flooding, soil salinity was high in areas where the water table was higher than 0.5 m and in dry patches where almost no cover of vegetation was found. In these sites the concentration of mineral nitrogen (N-NO3 and/or N-NH4) was especially high. A continuous vegetation cover developed on the peat soil in areas where the depth of the water table was between 1 m and 2 m. Mowing the vegetation periodically in summer suppressed the growth of tall, weedy species and promoted the dominance of Cynodon dactylon creating a dense, productive sward.
Effect of forming rate on the impact tensile properties of the steels under crash test
E. Bayraktar,M. Grumbach,D. Kaplan
Journal of Achievements in Materials and Manufacturing Engineering , 2007,
Abstract: Purpose: The main objective of this study is to examine the mechanical and metallurgical behaviour of thetailored blanks and base metals for thin sheet steels used in the car industry by using a new type of crash test/impact (ITT). It exposes the effect of forming rate on the toughness of thin welded joints (tailored blanks) forInterstitial Free (IFS) steels used in the automotive industry.Design/methodology/approach: A special crash test device is used in different temperature and the simulatedcrash tests are performed at a constant speed of 5.52 m/s (strain rate about 250 s 1).Findings: The specimen is submitted to impact tensile test at different temperatures. According to testingtemperature, fracture mode varies: At low temperatures, brittle fracture occurs: Due to stress concentration,fracture always occurs in the notched section. At high temperatures, the specimen fails by ductile fracture.Toughness of the steel sheets (base metals, BM or tailored blanks, TBs) after forming at certain levels is wellcompared at different materials and test conditions.Practical implications: This study gives very useful data for the crash test. This is a new conception ofspecimen and of the impact/crash machine. It is easily used in automotive industry for practical and economicreason to give rapid answers to designer and also steel makers for ranking the materials.Originality/value: This research used a new developed test called simplified crash test for evaluating theeffect of forming rate on the toughness of thin welded joints (tailored blanks) / mechanical assemblies in highformability steel sheets for stamping submitted to dynamic loads such as experienced in real crash tests.
Physics of An Ultrahigh-Statistics Charm Experiment
Michael D. Sokoloff,Daniel M. Kaplan
Physics , 1995,
Abstract: We review the physics goals of an ultrahigh-statistics charm experiment and place them in the broader context of the community's efforts to study the Standard Model and to search for physics beyond the Standard Model, and we point out some of the experimental difficulties which must be overcome if these goals are to be met.
Producing an Intense, Cool Muon Beam via e+e- Annihilation
D. M. Kaplan,T. Hart,P. Allport
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: We consider a highly unconventional approach to generating muon and antimuon bunches for a neutrino factory or muon collider: electron-positron annihilation just above muon-antimuon threshold. This approach can produce low-emittance bunches at high energy, easing the muon-cooling and acceleration challenges in such facilities. However, the small (< 1 $\mu$b) useable production cross section means that extraordinary beam-power and targeting challenges would have to be met. We speculate on what this might entail.
Status of MICE
Alan D. Bross,Daniel M. kaplan
Physics , 2008,
Abstract: Muon ionization cooling is the only practical method for preparing high-brilliance beams needed for a neutrino factory or muon collider. The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input emittance and momentum, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. A first measurement of emittance is performed in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating-fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in liquid hydrogen with RF acceleration. A second spectrometer identical to the first and a particle identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. Plans for measurements of emittance and cooling are described.
Interactions between brown-dwarf binaries and Sun-like stars
M. Kaplan,D. Stamatellos,A. P. Whitworth
Physics , 2012, DOI: 10.1007/s10509-012-1110-x
Abstract: Several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs, but there is as yet no consensus as to which -- if any -- are operative in nature. Any theory of brown dwarf formation must explain the observed statistics of brown dwarfs. These statistics are limited by selection effects, but they are becoming increasingly discriminating. In particular, it appears (a) that brown dwarfs that are secondaries to Sun-like stars tend to be on wide orbits, $a\ga 100\,{\rm AU}$ (the Brown Dwarf Desert), and (b) that these brown dwarfs have a significantly higher chance of being in a close ($a\la 10\,{\rm AU}$) binary system with another brown dwarf than do brown dwarfs in the field. This then raises the issue of whether these brown dwarfs have formed {\it in situ}, i.e. by fragmentation of a circumstellar disc; or have formed elsewhere and subsequently been captured. We present numerical simulations of the purely gravitational interaction between a close brown-dwarf binary and a Sun-like star. These simulations demonstrate that such interactions have a negligible chance ($<0.001$) of leading to the close brown-dwarf binary being captured by the Sun-like star. Making the interactions dissipative by invoking the hydrodynamic effects of attendant discs might alter this conclusion. However, in order to explain the above statistics, this dissipation would have to favour the capture of brown-dwarf binaries over single brown-dwarfs, and we present arguments why this is unlikely. The simplest inference is that most brown-dwarf binaries -- and therefore possibly also most single brown dwarfs -- form by fragmentation of circumstellar discs around Sun-like protostars, with some of them subsequently being ejected into the field.
Constraining the Spin-down of the Nearby Isolated Neutron Star RX J2143.0+0654
D. L. Kaplan,M. H. van Kerkwijk
Physics , 2009, DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/705/1/798
Abstract: Magnetic field estimates for nearby isolated neutron stars (INS) help to constrain both the characteristics of the population and the nature of their peculiar X-ray spectra. From a series of XMM-Newton observations of RX J2143.0+0654, we measure a spin-down rate of -4.6e-16 +/- 2.0e-16 Hz/s. While this does not allow a definitive measurement of the dipole magnetic field strength, fields of >1e14 G such as those inferred from the presence of a spectral absorption feature at 0.75keV are excluded. Instead, the field is most likely around 2e13 G, very similar to those of other INS. We not only suggest that this similarity most likely reflects the influence of magnetic field decay on this population, but also discuss a more speculative possibility that it results from peculiar conditions on the neutron-star surface. We find no evidence for spectral variability above the ~2% level. We confirm the presence of the 0.75-keV feature found earlier, and find tentative evidence for an additional absorption feature at 0.4 keV.
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