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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3771 matches for " Craig Hogan "
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Quantum Geometry in the Lab
Craig Hogan
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: Standard particle theory is based on quantized matter embedded in a classical geometry. Here, a complementary model is proposed, based on classical matter -- massive bodies, without quantum properties -- embedded in a quantum geometry. It does not describe elementary particles, but may be a better, fully consistent quantum description for position states in laboratory-scale systems. Gravitational theory suggests that the geometrical quantum system has an information density of about one qubit per Planck length squared. If so, the model here predicts that the quantum uncertainty of geometry creates a new form of noise in the position of massive bodies, detectable by interferometers.
Quantum Geometry and Interferometry
Craig Hogan
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: All existing experimental results are currently interpreted using classical geometry. However, there are theoretical reasons to suspect that at a deeper level, geometry emerges as an approximate macroscopic behavior of a quantum system at the Planck scale. If directions in emergent quantum geometry do not commute, new quantum-geometrical degrees of freedom can produce detectable macroscopic deviations from classicality: spatially coherent, transverse position indeterminacy between any pair of world lines, with a displacement amplitude much larger than the Planck length. Positions of separate bodies are entangled with each other, and undergo quantum-geometrical fluctuations that are not describable as metric fluctuations or gravitational waves. These fluctuations can either be cleanly identified or ruled out using interferometers. A Planck-precision test of the classical coherence of space-time on a laboratory scale is now underway at Fermilab.
Now Broadcasting in Planck Definition
Craig Hogan
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: If reality has finite information content, space has finite fidelity. The quantum wave function that encodes spatial relationships may be limited to information that can be transmitted in a "Planck broadcast", with a bandwidth given by the inverse of the Planck time, about $2\times 10^{43}$ bits per second. Such a quantum system can resemble classical space-time on large scales, but locality emerges only gradually and imperfectly. Massive bodies are never perfectly at rest, but very slightly and slowly fluctuate in transverse position, with a spectrum of variation given by the Planck time. This distinctive new kind of noise associated with quantum geometry would not have been noticed up to now, but may be detectable in a new kind of experiment.
Measurement of Quantum Geometry Using Laser Interferometry
Craig Hogan
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: New quantum degrees of freedom of space-time, originating at the Planck scale, could create a coherent indeterminacy and noise in the transverse position of massive bodies on macroscopic scales. An experiment is under development at Fermilab designed to detect or rule out a transverse position noise with Planck spectral density, using correlated signals from an adjacent pair of Michelson interferometers. A detection would open an experimental window on quantum space-time.
Holographic Noise in Interferometers
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 2009,
Abstract: Arguments based on general principles of quantum mechanics suggest that a minimum length or time associated with Planck-scale unification may entail a new kind of observable uncertainty in the transverse position of macroscopically separated bodies. Transverse positions vary randomly about classical geodesics in space and time by about the geometric mean of the Planck scale and separation, on a timescale corresponding to their separation. An effective theory based on a Planck information flux limit, and normalized by the black hole entropy formula, is developed to predict measurable correlations, such as the statistical properties of noise in interferometer signals. A connection with holographic unification is illustrated by representing Matrix theory position operators with a Schr\"odinger wave equation, interpreted as a paraxial wave equation with a Planck frequency carrier. Solutions of this equation are used to derive formulas for the spectrum of beamsplitter position fluctuations and equivalent strain noise in a Michelson interferometer, determined by the Planck time, with no other parameters. The spectral amplitude of equivalent strain derived here is a factor of \sqrt{\pi} smaller than previously published estimates. Signals in two nearly-collocated interferometers are predicted to be highly correlated, a feature that may provide convincing evidence for or against this interpretation of holography.
Interferometers as Probes of Planckian Quantum Geometry
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.85.064007
Abstract: A theory of position of massive bodies is proposed that results in an observable quantum behavior of geometry at the Planck scale, $t_P$. Departures from classical world lines in flat spacetime are described by Planckian noncommuting operators for position in different directions, as defined by interactions with null waves. The resulting evolution of position wavefunctions in two dimensions displays a new kind of directionally-coherent quantum noise of transverse position. The amplitude of the effect in physical units is predicted with no parameters, by equating the number of degrees of freedom of position wavefunctions on a 2D spacelike surface with the entropy density of a black hole event horizon of the same area. In a region of size $L$, the effect resembles spatially and directionally coherent random transverse shear deformations on timescale $\approx L/c$ with typical amplitude $\approx \sqrt{ct_PL}$. This quantum-geometrical "holographic noise" in position is not describable as fluctuations of a quantized metric, or as any kind of fluctuation, dispersion or propagation effect in quantum fields. In a Michelson interferometer the effect appears as noise that resembles a random Planckian walk of the beamsplitter for durations up to the light crossing time. Signal spectra and correlation functions in interferometers are derived, and predicted to be comparable with the sensitivities of current and planned experiments. It is proposed that nearly co-located Michelson interferometers of laboratory scale, cross-correlated at high frequency, can test the Planckian noise prediction with current technology.
Cosmic Fluctuations and Dark Matter from Scalar Field Oscillations
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 1994, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.74.3105
Abstract: Scale-invariant fluctuations and cold dark matter could originate from two different modes of a single scalar field, fluctuations from massless Goldstone oscillations and matter from massive Higgs modes. Matching the fluctuations and dark matter density observed requires a heavy scale ($\phi_0\approx 10^{16}$GeV) for the potential minimum and an extremely small self coupling ($\lambda\approx 10^{-83}$). Mode coupling causes the dark matter to form in lumps with nonnegligible velocities, leading to early collapse of dense dark matter ``miniclusters'' and halos on the scale of compact dwarf galaxies.
Measurement of Quantum Fluctuations in Geometry
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 2007, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.77.104031
Abstract: A particular form for the quantum indeterminacy of relative spacetime position of events is derived from the limits of measurement possible with Planck wavelength radiation. The indeterminacy predicts fluctuations from a classically defined geometry in the form of ``holographic noise'' whose spatial character, absolute normalization, and spectrum are predicted with no parameters. The noise has a distinctive transverse spatial shear signature, and a flat power spectral density given by the Planck time. An interferometer signal displays noise due to the uncertainty of relative positions of reflection events. The noise corresponds to an accumulation of phase offset with time that mimics a random walk of those optical elements that change the orientation of a wavefront. It only appears in measurements that compare transverse positions, and does not appear at all in purely radial position measurements. A lower bound on holographic noise follows from a covariant upper bound on gravitational entropy. The predicted holographic noise spectrum is estimated to be comparable to measured noise in the currently operating interferometer GEO600. Because of its transverse character, holographic noise is reduced relative to gravitational wave effects in other interferometer designs, such as LIGO, where beam power is much less in the beamsplitter than in the arms.
Primordial Deuterium Abundance and Cosmic Baryon Density
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 1994,
Abstract: The comparison of cosmic abundances of the light elements with the density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today provides a critical test of big bang theory and a powerful probe of the nature of dark matter. A new technique allows determination of cosmic deuterium abundances in quasar absorption clouds at large redshift, allowing a new test of big bang homogeneity in diverse, very distant systems. The first results of these studies are summarized, along with their implications. The quasar data are confronted with the apparently contradictory story from the helium-3 abundances measured in our Galaxy. The density of baryonic stars and gas in the universe today is reviewed and compared with the big bang prediction.
Quantum Indeterminacy of Emergent Spacetime
Craig J. Hogan
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: It is shown that nearly-flat 3+1D spacetime emerging from a dual quantum field theory in 2+1D displays quantum fluctuations from classical Euclidean geometry on macroscopic scales. A covariant holographic mapping is assumed, where plane wave states with wavevector k on a 2D surface map onto classical null trajectories in the emergent third dimension at an angle \theta=l_P k relative to the surface element normal, where l_P denotes the Planck length. Null trajectories in the 3+1D world then display quantum uncertainty of angular orientation, with standard deviation \Delta\theta=\sqrt{l_P/z} for longitudinal propagation distance z in a given frame. The quantum complementarity of transverse position at macroscopically separated events along null trajectories corresponds to a geometry that is not completely classical, but displays observable holographic quantum noise. A statistical estimator of the fluctuations from Euclidean behavior is given for a simple thought experiment based on measured sides of triangles. The effect can be viewed as sampling noise due to the limited degrees of freedom of such a theory, consistent with covariant bounds on entropy.
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