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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 492 matches for " Council of Ministers "
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The development of a 1946 draft decree of the USSR Council of Ministers on populating the agricultural areas of the Kaliningrad region
Maslov V.
Vestnik Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University , 2013,
Abstract: This article examines the development of draft resolutions of the USSR Council of Ministers “On the Priority Measures for the Population of Districts and the Development of Agriculture in the Kaliningrad Region.” The author considers the reasons behind a reduction in financial benefits and food support for settlers in the Kaliningrad region.
Estimating the Efficiency of Voting in Big Size Committees
Pavel Dole?el
AUCO Czech Economic Review , 2011,
Abstract: In a simple voting committee with a finite number of members, in which each member has a voting weight, the voting rule is defined by the quota (a minimal number of voting weights is required to approve a proposal), and the efficiency of voting in the committee is defined as the ratio of the number of winning coalitions (subsets of the set of members with total voting weights no less than the quota) to the number of all possible coalitions. A straightforward way of calculating the efficiency is based on the full enumeration of all coalitions and testing whether or not they are winning. The enumeration of all coalitions is NP-complete problem (the time required to find the solution grows exponentially with the size of the committee) and is unusable for big size committees. In this paper we are developing three algorithms (two exact and one heuristic) to compute the efficiency for committees with high number of voters within a reasonable timeframe. Algorithms are applied for evaluating the voting effi ciency in the Lower House of the Czech Parliament, in the European Parliament and in the Council of Ministers of the EU.
Old 'foundations' and new 'rules' - For an enlarged European Union
Philippe C. Schmitter,José I. Torreblanca
European Integration Online Papers , 1997,
Abstract: This paper presents a novel arrangement for the distribution of votes and the rules of decision-making in an enlarged European Union (EU). We make two assumptions: (1) that the EU is condemned to enlarge its membership in the near future; and (2) if it does this without changing the existing rules for voting in the Council of Ministers and distributing seats in the European Parliament, such an expanded EU would suffer severe distortions and disequilibria. However, if it were to adopt a new, simplified system that would combine arrangements for proportional proportionality in representation and concurrent majorities in decision-making, this impending dilemma could be avoided. Moreover, if these reforms were introduced sooner rather than later, they would be easier to agree upon, their impact would be phased in gradually, and their legitimacy could be stabilized in the face of far greater challenges in the future.
Old 'foundations' and new 'rules' - For an enlarged European Union
Phillipe C. Schmitter,José I. Torreblanca
European Integration Online Papers , 1997,
Abstract: This paper presents a novel arrangement for the distribution of votes and the rules of decision-making in an enlarged European Union (EU). We make two assumptions: (1) that the EU is condemned to enlarge its membership in the near future; and (2) if it does this without changing the existing rules for voting in the Council of Ministers and distributing seats in the European Parliament, such an expanded EU would suffer severe distortions and disequilibria. However, if it were to adopt a new, simplified system that would combine arrangements for proportional proportionality in representation and concurrent majorities in decision-making, this impending dilemma could be avoided. Moreover, if these reforms were introduced sooner rather than later, they would be easier to agree upon, their impact would be phased in gradually, and their legitimacy could be stabilized in the face of far greater challenges in the future.
Beyond continuity: Analysis of the effects of the first Trio Presidency on Policy Coherence for Development
Sabina Kajnc Lange
European Integration Online Papers , 2012,
Abstract: The present article explores whether the first Trio Presidency of the Council of Ministers of the European Union (EU), composed of Germany, Portugal and Slovenia, lived up to the goal of ensuring greater continuity and sustainability in managing the Council’s work. Focusing on the Trio’s performance in promoting the principle of Policy Coherence for Development (PCD) in EU global action, the article explores patterns of cooperation established by the first Trio alongside the traditional roles of the rotating presidency, as the manager, provider of political initiative, broker, and representative of the Council and member states. The contribution demonstrates the emergence of a distinctive cooperation pattern among Germany, Portugal, and Slovenia, which we refer to as ‘Trio effects’. While such effects were established in all presidency functions with the exception of EU external representation, the Trio effects in exerting management functions contributed most in having more continuity in the promotion of the PCD. Taking into account the particular institutional and procedural context in which the Trio operated, the contribution draws lessons for the role of the Trio in the post-Lisbon external action system. Along with the review of official policy documents and secondary sources, this contribution draws on 40 anonymous semi-structured expert interviews, which were conducted by both authors between 2007 and 2009 in Brussels, Berlin, Lisbon and Ljubljana.
The Penrose’s Law and Decision-Making Processes in the Council of the European Union. Case Study: the Impact of the Square Root’ Rule on Formation of Romania’s Coalitions in the Council of Ministers
Constantin Chiriac
Theoretical and Applied Economics , 2009,
Abstract: Enlargement of the European Union has led to much discussion on the need to reform institutions so that the various inequalities between the member states to be removed. Such Treaties of Nice and Lisbon do not grant to citizens of member the same influence in the decision-making in the Council of Ministers. One of the solutions proposed to remedy this problem is to establish a voting scheme that gives each country a share of votes proportional to the square root of the population and determining the optimum of a threshold, known as the Jagiellonian Compromise. Starting from the analysis of Penrose square root law in the decision-making Council of Ministers, the article presents a case study on the influence of approximation by rounding the share of votes on the coalition’s formation in the case of Romania.
Accountability deficits in European ‘Comitology’ decision-making
Gijs Jan Brandsma
European Integration Online Papers , 2007,
Abstract: Comitology committees are often accused of not being accountable. This paper aims to provide building blocks to analyze the validity of this claim. After briefly discussing the meaning and aims of accountability, it is discussed where the actual accountability problems can be expected. Institutionally, one may expect them between the committees and the Commission on one side, and the Council and European Parliament on the other. Even the currently introduced new procedures cannot fully remedy accountability problems emerging there. Individually, one may expect accountability problems in the delegation of tasks to more or less autonomously operating experts. This twofold analysis may help further empirical research in this area.
After Hierarchy? Domestic Executive Governance and the Differentiated Impact of the European Commission and the Council of Ministers
Jarle Trondal
European Integration Online Papers , 2005,
Abstract: This study offers an organisation theory approach that claims that the differentiated organisational constellation of the European Union contributes to a differentiated Europeanisation of domestic core-executives. It is argued that the European Commission mainly activates the lower echelons of the domestic government hierarchies, notably professional experts within sector ministries and agencies. Furthermore, the European Commission arguably weakens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. By contrast, the Council of Ministers arguably strengthens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. A comparative analysis of the decision-making processes within the central administrations of Norway and Sweden is offered. Based on a rich body of survey and interview data this analysis reveals that multi-level interaction of administrative systems between the European Commission and the Norwegian and Swedish central administrations occur largely outside the control of the domestic politico-administrative leadership, Prime Ministers Office and Foreign Office. In Sweden this tendency is to some extent counterbalanced by the inter-sectorally interlocking effect of the Council of Ministers.
After Hierarchy? Domestic Executive Governance and the Differentiated Impact of the European Commission and the Council of Ministers
Larsson,Torbjorn; Trondal,Jarle
European Integration Online Papers , 2005,
Abstract: This study offers an organisation theory approach that claims that the differentiated organisational constellation of the European Union contributes to a differentiated Europeanisation of domestic core-executives. It is argued that the European Commission mainly activates the lower echelons of the domestic government hierarchies, notably professional experts within sector ministries and agencies. Furthermore, the European Commission arguably weakens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. By contrast, the Council of Ministers arguably strengthens domestic politico-administrative leadership, the Foreign Office and the Prime Ministers Office. A comparative analysis of the decision-making processes within the central administrations of Norway and Sweden is offered. Based on a rich body of survey and interview data this analysis reveals that multi-level interaction of administrative systems between the European Commission and the Norwegian and Swedish central administrations occur largely outside the control of the domestic politico-administrative leadership, Prime Ministers Office and Foreign Office. In Sweden this tendency is to some extent counterbalanced by the inter-sectorally interlocking effect of the Council of Ministers.
The Treaty of Amsterdam: Towards a New Institutional Balance
Michael Nentwich,Gerda Falkner
European Integration Online Papers , 1997,
Abstract: This paper analyses the so-called 'Draft Treaty of Amsterdam' of 19 June 1997, focusing on the changes concerning the institutions and the decision-making procedures. It is argued that the sum of envisaged changes will considerably alter the institutional balance between the three main actors, i.e. the Commission, the Council and the European Parliament. The latter, in particular, will have an increased influence vis-à-vis the Commission (via the investiture procedure) and a greater say vis-à-vis the Council (in the codecision procedure). With regard to the internal organisation of the three institutions, too, remarkable changes are on the horizon. The roles of the Committee of the Regions and of the national parliaments in EC policy-making have been consolidated and clarified respectively. We conclude with an overall assessment of the results of the IGC 1996/97. The paper includes a synopsis of all Treaty changes in the procedural field, and a graph presenting the new codecision procedure.
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