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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 17037 matches for " Cinzia Di Lorenzo "
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A new station for monitoring electromagnetic fields in Duronia (Italy): experimental setup and first results
Paolo Palangio,Fabrizio Masci,Manuele Di Persio,Cinzia Di Lorenzo
Annals of Geophysics , 2009, DOI: 10.4401/ag-4601
Abstract: Since the end of 2007 a new electromagnetic field monitoring station has been in operation in Central Italy in the area of a village called Duronia. The station was created in the framework of the MEM (Magnetic and Electric fields Monitoring) Project composed of a team headed by the Abruzzo region. The main target of the MEM Project is to create in the Adriatic Area a network of observatories to monitor the environmental electromagnetic signals in the frequency band from 0.001Hz to 100kHz (ULF-ELF-VLF). The peculiarity of the Duronia installation is the low electromagnetic background noise of the site and the low noise of the instrumentation. Here we show the experimental setup, with a brief discussion on the installed instrumentation and on the preliminaresults obtained in the first months of operation. The research activity is mainly focused on the analysis of the spectral structure of the Schumann Resonance in the range of frequencies [5.0-35.0]Hz, and the Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator in the range of frequencies [0.1-7.0]Hz and their evolution in time. Another target concerns the long-term monitoring of local magnetic field anomalies possiblelated to the local geodynamical processes.
Neurobiological Correlates of EMDR Monitoring – An EEG Study
Marco Pagani, Giorgio Di Lorenzo, Anna Rita Verardo, Giampaolo Nicolais, Leonardo Monaco, Giada Lauretti, Rita Russo, Cinzia Niolu, Massimo Ammaniti, Isabel Fernandez, Alberto Siracusano
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0045753
Abstract: Background Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a recognized first-line treatment for psychological trauma. However its neurobiological bases have yet to be fully disclosed. Methods Electroencephalography (EEG) was used to fully monitor neuronal activation throughout EMDR sessions including the autobiographical script. Ten patients with major psychological trauma were investigated during their first EMDR session (T0) and during the last one performed after processing the index trauma (T1). Neuropsychological tests were administered at the same time. Comparisons were performed between EEGs of patients at T0 and T1 and between EEGs of patients and 10 controls who underwent the same EMDR procedure at T0. Connectivity analyses were carried out by lagged phase synchronization. Results During bilateral ocular stimulation (BS) of EMDR sessions EEG showed a significantly higher activity on the orbito-frontal, prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex in patients at T0 shifting towards left temporo-occipital regions at T1. A similar trend was found for autobiographical script with a higher firing in fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0 moving to right temporo-occipital cortex at T1. The comparisons between patients and controls confirmed the maximal activation in the limbic cortex of patients occurring before trauma processing. Connectivity analysis showed decreased pair-wise interactions between prefrontal and cingulate cortex during BS in patients as compared to controls and between fusiform gyrus and visual cortex during script listening in patients at T1 as compared to T0. These changes correlated significantly with those occurring in neuropsychological tests. Conclusions The ground-breaking methodology enabled our study to image for the first time the specific activations associated with the therapeutic actions typical of EMDR protocol. The findings suggest that traumatic events are processed at cognitive level following successful EMDR therapy, thus supporting the evidence of distinct neurobiological patterns of brain activations during BS associated with a significant relief from negative emotional experiences.
Neural Modulation of Hemiparetic Shoulder Pain by Repetitive Ultrasound-Guided Suprascapularis Nerve Block  [PDF]
Luigi Di Lorenzo,Santopadre Domenico
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.33030
Abstract: Background: Neural blockade is widely used in clinical practice to alleviate acute or chronic pain, including pain during rehabilitation. To date there is little controlled evidence to confirm the efficacy of nerve blocks in hemiparetic shoulder pain after stroke. Design: This study is a prospective, open label, cohort trial reporting result from a cohort of stroke patients affected by shoulder pain. Aim: As a cohort study report, in which it is often firstly reported the possibility of an association between an observed effect and a specific environmental based on detailed clinical evaluations and histories, we aim to firstly provide clues in identifying Suprascapularis Nerve blockade as further valuable approach for shoulder pain after stroke. Population: We studied a cohort of patients affected by hemiparetic shoulder pain after Stroke. Methods: Our protocol foresees nerve blocks to be performed each 3 out of 4 days (treatment lasting 30 days) in conjunction with a rehabilitation program with the first aim to provide the window of opportunity to proceed with effective rehabilitation. 47 potential study subjects fulfilled the study criteria and were enrolled. Twenty-four subjects were randomised to the study Group to receive SSNB for the pain of their hemiparetic shoulder while 23 subjects randomized to the control Group whose member did not receive SSNB. They received serial blocks each 3 out of 4 days during rehabilitation.Results: Both treatment reported a reduction in the intensity of their shoulder pain, according to data collected from day 1 through day 42 (6 weeks). Study Group patients, receiving SSNBs, reported significant improvement from entry through the whole follow-up period. The efficiency data were higher for SSNB Group after 2 weeks and again for SSNb group at the end of treatment. Conclusion: Excellent pain relief was achieved in SSNB without clinically relevant complications, these patients having a better improvement on pain during rehabilitation, than the control subjects. Great efficacy has been achieved by combining a nerve block and rehabilitation. About Clinical Rehabilitation Impact, we believe that Suprascapularis nerve blocks can help the stroke survivors maintain an ambulatory or outpatient treatment status, maintain participation in a physical therapy or rehabilitation program, decrease the need for analgesics and in some cases lead to a complete pain relief.
Neural Modulation of Hemiparetic Shoulder Pain by Repetitive Ultrasound-Guided Suprascapularis Nerve Block  [PDF]
Luigi Di Lorenzo, Santopadre Domenico
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.33030
Abstract:

Background: Neural blockade is widely used in clinical practice to alleviate acute or chronic pain, including pain during rehabilitation. To date there is little controlled evidence to confirm the efficacy of nerve blocks in hemiparetic shoulder pain after stroke. Design: This study is a prospective, open label, cohort trial reporting result from a cohort of stroke patients affected by shoulder pain. Aim: As a cohort study report, in which it is often firstly reported the possibility of an association between an observed effect and a specific environmental based on detailed clinical evaluations and histories, we aim to firstly provide clues in identifying Suprascapularis Nerve blockade as further valuable approach for shoulder pain after stroke. Population: We studied a cohort of patients affected by hemiparetic shoulder pain after Stroke. Methods: Our protocol foresees nerve blocks to be performed each 3 out of 4 days (treatment lasting 30 days) in conjunction with a rehabilitation program with the first aim to provide the window of opportunity to proceed with effective rehabilitation. 47 potential study subjects fulfilled the study criteria and were enrolled. Twenty-four subjects were randomised to the study Group to receive SSNB for the pain of their hemiparetic shoulder while 23 subjects randomized to the control Group whose member did not receive SSNB. They received serial blocks each 3 out of 4 days during rehabilitation.Results: Both treatment reported a reduction in

Gut Peculiarities of Feed Deprived White Sturgeons (Acipenser transmontanus, Richardson 1836)  [PDF]
Alessia Di Giancamillo, Piera Anna Martino, Silvana Arrighi, Cinzia Domeneghini
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine (OJVM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2012.22009
Abstract: In the White sturgeon fish farms, some individuals have difficulty in getting access to food: such sturgeons are called \"runts\", and they result in a slower growth rate than normally feeding fish. In this paper, we have studied the gut peculiarities of runt sturgeons. Utilizing in paralleling an analysis of diatom populations in both the fish gut tissues and the rearing tank waters, we hypothesized a causative relation between the occurrence of runt sturgeons and periodic diatom blooms. In fact, we have observed that the diatom species identified in the aquatic environment were also detected in organs (Fragilaria spp and Rhoicosfenia spp for both glandular body, mid-intestine) of the runt sturgeon's gut, but not in tissues of normally feeding individuals. Owing to their siliceous wall, diatoms can be responsible for areas of epithetlial detachment in the mucosal surfaces of the alimentary canal and a catharral inflammation in both the gastric pits and intestinal folds which may be the cause of secondary bacterial diseases. We suggest that diatom blooms may contribute to the occurrence of runt sturgeons in the studied Italian fish farm.
A Categorical Theory of Patches
Samuel Mimram,Cinzia Di Giusto
Mathematics , 2013, DOI: 10.1016/j.entcs.2013.09.018
Abstract: When working with distant collaborators on the same documents, one often uses a version control system, which is a program tracking the history of files and helping importing modifications brought by others as patches. The implementation of such a system requires to handle lots of situations depending on the operations performed by users on files, and it is thus difficult to ensure that all the corner cases have been correctly addressed. Here, instead of verifying the implementation of such a system, we adopt a complementary approach: we introduce a theoretical model, which is defined abstractly by the universal property that it should satisfy, and work out a concrete description of it. We begin by defining a category of files and patches, where the operation of merging the effect of two coinitial patches is defined by pushout. Since two patches can be incompatible, such a pushout does not necessarily exist in the category, which raises the question of which is the correct category to represent and manipulate files in conflicting state. We provide an answer by investigating the free completion of the category of files under finite colimits, and give an explicit description of this category: its objects are finite sets labeled by lines equipped with a transitive relation and morphisms are partial functions respecting labeling and relations.
Transdermal Nitroglycerine Patch: An Optional Device to Reduce Flap Venous Congestion? A Case Report  [PDF]
Sara Di Lorenzo, Bartolo Corradino, Adriana Cordova
Modern Plastic Surgery (MPS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/mps.2013.34024
Abstract:

Sometimes in free flap there is a venous congestion without an obstruction of the venous anastomosis or other organic causes of reduction venous drainage (haematoma, seroma compressing the pedicle). In these cases the authors suggest the application of nitroglycerine patch in the congested area of the flap few hours before the surgical exploration of the anastomosis. If there is a fast improvement of the clinical feature of the flap, the surgical exploration could be avoided. The authors underline that applying the nitroglycerin patch should not be regarded in any way as a therapy of a free flap venous thrombosis but only as an useful device, an option to be taken only when the surgeon is undecided whether to revisit the anastomosis or not.

Measuring Risk-Adjusted Performance and Product Attractiveness of a Life Annuity Portfolio  [PDF]
Emilia Di Lorenzo, Albina Orlando, Marilena Sibillo
Journal of Mathematical Finance (JMF) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jmf.2017.71005
Abstract: The paper proposes a new methodological approach for the product performance analysis into the actuarial context. Two indexes are proposed as restyled versions of the corresponding most popular ones: They have been adapted into the actuarial assessment preserving the plainness in the interpretation of the numerical results. The paper offers a practical implementation of the new approach in the case of a specific contract, containing itself innovative profiles: It concerns a life annuity in which the installments are scaled by a demographic index and contains an embedded option linked to the financial profit participating quota. It is a new life product linked at the same time to the financial and demographic volatility. The product project is studied in its profitability performance assuming stochastic hypotheses for the financial and demographic systematic risks. The indexes are implemented in a conditional quantile simulated framework and tables and graphs illustrate their trends as function of time. The results give an example of the usefulness of the proposed indexes in the phase of decisions about the product design feasibility. Moreover some suggestions concerning the consumer’s perception of the contract profitability are obtained by means of a utility-equivalent fixed annuity.
Immunohistochemical Aspects of Ito and Kupffer Cells in the Liver of Domesticated and Wild Ruminants  [PDF]
Valentina Carollo, Alessia Di Giancamillo, Francesca Vitari, Rainer Schneider, Cinzia Domeneghini
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine (OJVM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2012.23022
Abstract: The mammalian liver is a morphologically and functionally complex organ, made up of not only of the largely predominant parenchymal cells (hepatocytes) but also non-parenchymal cells. Although there are less non-parenchymal cells than hepatocytes, they nevertheless play an important role in regulating many hepatocyte functions, as well as in the immunology of the liver. We investigated the structural aspects of the liver and the morpho-functional characteristics of Ito and Kupffer cells in two domesticated ruminant species (cattle and goat) in comparison with four wild ruminant species living in captivity in a zoo in northern Italy. The liver specimens were studied using histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The liver parenchyma was structurally normal. Immunohistochemistry was performed for desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I, lysozyme, CD 68 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). In all the studied ruminants, Ito cells reacted with desmin and vimentin antibodies, Kupffer cells were evidenced only with lysozyme-immunopositivity, and both displayed a characteristic distribution in the hepatic lobular/acinar structure. The results obtained, not only contribute to the knowledge of ruminant wild species, but also help to define a normal structure reference for the diagnosis and treatment of liver diseases.
The Golden Beauty: Brain Response to Classical and Renaissance Sculptures
Cinzia Di Dio, Emiliano Macaluso, Giacomo Rizzolatti
PLOS ONE , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0001201
Abstract: Is there an objective, biological basis for the experience of beauty in art? Or is aesthetic experience entirely subjective? Using fMRI technique, we addressed this question by presenting viewers, na?ve to art criticism, with images of masterpieces of Classical and Renaissance sculpture. Employing proportion as the independent variable, we produced two sets of stimuli: one composed of images of original sculptures; the other of a modified version of the same images. The stimuli were presented in three conditions: observation, aesthetic judgment, and proportion judgment. In the observation condition, the viewers were required to observe the images with the same mind-set as if they were in a museum. In the other two conditions they were required to give an aesthetic or proportion judgment on the same images. Two types of analyses were carried out: one which contrasted brain response to the canonical and the modified sculptures, and one which contrasted beautiful vs. ugly sculptures as judged by each volunteer. The most striking result was that the observation of original sculptures, relative to the modified ones, produced activation of the right insula as well as of some lateral and medial cortical areas (lateral occipital gyrus, precuneus and prefrontal areas). The activation of the insula was particularly strong during the observation condition. Most interestingly, when volunteers were required to give an overt aesthetic judgment, the images judged as beautiful selectively activated the right amygdala, relative to those judged as ugly. We conclude that, in observers na?ve to art criticism, the sense of beauty is mediated by two non-mutually exclusive processes: one based on a joint activation of sets of cortical neurons, triggered by parameters intrinsic to the stimuli, and the insula (objective beauty); the other based on the activation of the amygdala, driven by one's own emotional experiences (subjective beauty).
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