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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 301683 matches for " Cindy J Wong "
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Fatigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program
Cindy J Wong, Donna Goodridge, Darcy D Marciniuk, et al
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S12321
Abstract: tigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program Short Report (8175) Total Article Views Authors: Cindy J Wong, Donna Goodridge, Darcy D Marciniuk, et al Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:5 Pages 319 - 326 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S12321 Cindy J Wong1, Donna Goodridge1, Darcy D Marciniuk2, Donna Rennie1,3 1College of Nursing, 2College of Medicine, 3Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada Background: Fatigue is a distressing, complex, multidimensional sensation common in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While fatigue negatively impacts functional performance and quality of life, there has been little study of the fatigue that affects participants in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and physical dimensions of fatigue and their relationships to dyspnea, mental health, sleep, and physiologic factors. Patients and methods: A convenience sample of 42 pulmonary rehabilitation participants with COPD completed self-report questionnaires which measured dimensions of fatigue using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data on other clinical variables were abstracted from pulmonary rehabilitation program health records. Results: Almost all (95.3%) participants experienced high levels of physical fatigue. High levels of fatigue were also reported for the dimensions of reduced activity (88.1%), reduced motivation (83.3%), mental fatigue (69.9%), and general fatigue (54.5%). Close to half (42.9%) of participants reported symptoms of anxiety, while almost one quarter (21.4%) reported depressive symptoms. Age was related to the fatigue dimensions of reduced activity (ρ = 0.43, P < 0.01) and reduced motivation (ρ = 0.31, P < 0.05). Anxiety was related to reduced motivation (ρ = -0.47, P < 0.01). Fatigue was not associated with symptoms of depression, sleep quality, gender, supplemental oxygen use, smoking status, or Medical Research Council dyspnea scores. Conclusions: Fatigue (particularly the physical and reduced motivation dimensions of fatigue) was experienced by almost all participants with COPD attending this pulmonary rehabilitation program. Fatigue affected greater proportions of participants than either anxiety or depression. The high prevalence of fatigue may impact on enrolment, participation, and attrition in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Further investigation of the nature, correlates, and impact of fatigue in this population is required.
Fatigue in patients with COPD participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program
Cindy J Wong,Donna Goodridge,Darcy D Marciniuk,et al
International Journal of COPD , 2010,
Abstract: Cindy J Wong1, Donna Goodridge1, Darcy D Marciniuk2, Donna Rennie1,31College of Nursing, 2College of Medicine, 3Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, CanadaBackground: Fatigue is a distressing, complex, multidimensional sensation common in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While fatigue negatively impacts functional performance and quality of life, there has been little study of the fatigue that affects participants in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the emotional, behavioral, cognitive, and physical dimensions of fatigue and their relationships to dyspnea, mental health, sleep, and physiologic factors.Patients and methods: A convenience sample of 42 pulmonary rehabilitation participants with COPD completed self-report questionnaires which measured dimensions of fatigue using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and sleep quality using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Data on other clinical variables were abstracted from pulmonary rehabilitation program health records.Results: Almost all (95.3%) participants experienced high levels of physical fatigue. High levels of fatigue were also reported for the dimensions of reduced activity (88.1%), reduced motivation (83.3%), mental fatigue (69.9%), and general fatigue (54.5%). Close to half (42.9%) of participants reported symptoms of anxiety, while almost one quarter (21.4%) reported depressive symptoms. Age was related to the fatigue dimensions of reduced activity (ρ = 0.43, P < 0.01) and reduced motivation (ρ = 0.31, P < 0.05). Anxiety was related to reduced motivation (ρ = -0.47, P < 0.01). Fatigue was not associated with symptoms of depression, sleep quality, gender, supplemental oxygen use, smoking status, or Medical Research Council dyspnea scores.Conclusions: Fatigue (particularly the physical and reduced motivation dimensions of fatigue) was experienced by almost all participants with COPD attending this pulmonary rehabilitation program. Fatigue affected greater proportions of participants than either anxiety or depression. The high prevalence of fatigue may impact on enrolment, participation, and attrition in pulmonary rehabilitation programs. Further investigation of the nature, correlates, and impact of fatigue in this population is required.Keywords: COPD, fatigue, pulmonary rehabilitation, anxiety, depression, sleep quality
Abstinence Education Changes Perceptions of Middle School Students  [PDF]
Tary J. Tobin, Cindy Bankston
Creative Education (CE) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2017.815164
Abstract: Abstinence education lessons were designed to address teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) among adolescent youth. A community nonprofit organization with extensive experience in abstinence education trained youth leaders and high school students to collaborate with public school health education teachers. The lessons were based on Promoting Health Among Teens! [PHAT] Abstinence-Only, School Edition(Jemmott, Jemmott, & McCaffree, 2014). Originally developed for use in schools with a high proportion of African Americans, they were adapted for use in schools with a high proportion of Latinos. Over 1000 students from nine middle schools in the northwest part of the United States participated. Responses to pre- and post-intervention survey items were compared and indicated improvements in knowledge of the benefits of sexual abstinence and changes in attitudes toward abstinence. The outcomes of the It’s Legit II: Promoting Health Among Teens! Project indicated?that it was implemented well, received well, and had a beneficial effect.
Early Electrophysiological Basis of Experience-Associated Holistic Processing of Chinese Characters
Hui Chen, Cindy M. Bukach, Alan C.-N. Wong
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061221
Abstract: Recent studies have found holistic processing to be a marker of expertise for perception of words in alphabetic (e.g., English) and non-alphabetic (e.g., Chinese) writing systems, consistent with what has been found for faces and other objects of face-like expertise. It is unknown, however, whether holistic processing of words occurs in an early, perceptual stage as it does for faces. We examined how early holistic processing of Chinese characters emerges by recording the event-related potentials (ERPs) in an adaptation paradigm. Participants judged if the top parts of two sequentially presented characters were the same or different while ignoring the bottom part. An early potential (P1) at the posterior channels was smaller when the attended top parts were the same compared with when they are different, indicating an adaptation effect. Critically, for trials with identical top parts, P1 was larger when the irrelevant bottom parts were different, indicating a release of adaptation. This effect was present only when the two character parts were aligned but not misaligned, and only for characters but not for pseudocharacters. The finding of early sensitivity to all parts of a Chinese character suggests that Chinese characters are represented holistically at a perceptual level.
The Effects of a Primary Nutritional Deficiency (Vitamin B study)  [PDF]
Hugh D. Riordan, Nina Mikirova, Paul R. Taylor, Cindy A. Feldkamp, Joseph J. Casciari
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2012.39163
Abstract: It has long been understood there is a link between a nutrient deficiency and visually measurable health. In separate studies, Sprague Dawley or Fischer 344 rats were fed diets lacking 100% of one B-Vitamin until a single mortality occurred. Vitamins studied were thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, cobalamin and folate. Body mass, food consumption and images were recorded at weekly intervals. Rats were euthanized and liver, kidney, heart and brain samples for histological analysis were prepared. Liver and brain tissues were chosen as markers because of the high need of that organ for B vitamins and the likelihood of secondary lesion development. Correlation of deficiency symptoms with one missing nutrient was explored.
Adapting Small Market Rural Media to the Challenges of New Media: Interviews with Small Market Rural Managers
Cindy J. Price,Michael R. Brown
Online Journal of Rural Research & Policy , 2010, DOI: 10.4148/ojrrp.v5i6.234
Abstract: Small rural media outlets are key sources of information, provide a site for local advertising, and are an important local voice in their communities. This paper examines how small market rural media are trying to survive under tough economic conditions, and how they are using new media as part of their strategy to remain viable. Interviews were conducted with managers at several small market newspapers, television, and radio groups in order to identify specific concerns and strategies about how they are managing their resources, how they are using new media, and how they envision their future. The results show that most media are struggling, but also find that local media are in a good position to make their new media content viable for their local audiences.
Holistic Processing of Words Modulated by Reading Experience
Alan C.-N. Wong,Cindy M. Bukach,Crystal Yuen,Lizhuang Yang,Shirley Leung,Emma Greenspon
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020753
Abstract: Perceptual expertise has been studied intensively with faces and object categories involving detailed individuation. A common finding is that experience in fulfilling the task demand of fine, subordinate-level discrimination between highly similar instances is associated with the development of holistic processing. This study examines whether holistic processing is also engaged by expert word recognition, which is thought to involve coarser, basic-level processing that is more part-based. We adopted a paradigm widely used for faces – the composite task, and found clear evidence of holistic processing for English words. A second experiment further showed that holistic processing for words was sensitive to the amount of experience with the language concerned (native vs. second-language readers) and with the specific stimuli (words vs. pseudowords). The adoption of a paradigm from the face perception literature to the study of expert word perception is important for further comparison between perceptual expertise with words and face-like expertise.
Clinical Correlates of Health Preference and Generic Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Colorectal Neoplasms
Carlos K. H. Wong, Cindy L. K. Lam, Jensen T. C. Poon, Dora L. W. Kwong
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058341
Abstract: Background The aims of the study were to assess the health preference and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with colorectal neoplasms (CRN), and to determine the clinical correlates that significantly influence the HRQOL of patients. Methods Five hundred and fifty-four CRN patients, inclusive of colorectal polyp or cancer, who attended the colorectal specialist outpatient clinic at Queen Mary Hospital in Hong Kong between October 2009 and July 2010, were included. Patients were interviewed with questionnaires on socio-demographic characteristics, and generic and health preference measures of HRQOL using the SF-12 and SF-6D Health Surveys, respectively. Clinical information on stage of disease at diagnosis, time since diagnosis, primary tumour site was extracted from electronic case record. Mean HRQOL and health preference scores of CRN patients were compared with age-sex matched controls from the Chinese general population using independent t-test. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to explore the associations of clinical characteristics with HRQOL measures with the adjustment of socio-demographic characteristics. Results Cross-sectional data of 515 eligible patients responded to the whole questionnaires were included in outcome analysis. In comparison with age-sex matched normative values, CRN patients reported comparable physical-related HRQOL but better mental-related HRQOL. Amongst CRN patients, time since diagnosis was positively associated with health preference score whilst patients with rectal neoplasms had lower health preference and physical-related HRQOL scores than those with sigmoid neoplasms. Health preference and HRQOL scores were significantly lower in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer than those with other less severe stages, indicating that progressive decline from low-risk polyp to stage IV colorectal cancer was observed in HRQOL scores. Conclusion In CRN patients, a more advanced stage of disease was associated with worse HRQOL scores. Despite potentially adverse effect of disease on physical-related HRQOL, the mental-related HRQOL of CRN patients were better than that of Chinese general population.
Having a family doctor is associated with some better patient reported outcomes of primary care consultations
Cindy L. Lam,Carlos K. Wong,Daniel Y. Fong,Albert Lee,Tai Pong Lam
Frontiers in Medicine , 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fmed.2014.00029
Abstract: Background: Hong Kong (HK) has pluralistic primary care that is provided by a variety of doctors. The aim of our study was to assess patient-reported outcomes of primary care consultations in HK and whether having a family doctor made any difference. Methods: We interviewed by telephone 3148 subjects from 5174 contacted households (response rate 60.8%) randomly selected from the general population of HK about the experience of their last primary care consultations in September 2007 and April 2008. We compared the patient reported outcomes (PRO) and patient-centred process of care in those with a family doctor (FD), those with other types of regular primary care doctors (ORD) and those without any regular primary care doctor (NRD). PRO included patient enablement, global improvement in health, overall satisfaction and likelihood of recommending their doctors to family and friends. Patient-centred process of care indicators were explanations about the illness, and address of patient’s concerns. Results: 1150, 746 and 1157 reported to have FD, ORD and NRD, respectively. Over 80% of those with FD consulted their usual primary care doctors in the last consultation compared with 27% of those with NRD. Compared with subjects having ORD or NRD, subjects with FD reported being more enabled after the consultation and were more likely to recommend their doctors to family and friends. Subjects with FD and ORD were more likely than those having NRD to report a global improvement in health and satisfaction. FD group was more likely than the other two groups to report receiving an explanation on the diagnosis, nature and expected course of the illness, and having their concerns addressed. Patient enablement was associated with explanation of diagnosis,nature and expected course of the illness and address of patient’s concerns. Conclusions: People with a regular family doctor were more likely to feel being enabled and to experience patient-centred care in consultations.
Integrated and Seamless Services for Active Aging, a Model for Zhuhai  [PDF]
H. C. J. Wong, Y. F. Ng, X. L. Yuan
Journal of Biosciences and Medicines (JBM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbm.2014.26007
Abstract:

The Aging Tsunami as it is often quoted to describe the worrying situations of rapidly aging in China has not met with detail planning in facilities upgrade and careful consideration in service models. Broad brushed central policies categorizes services into home care, community care and institutional care and set policy goals at 90-6-4, representing the percentage of older people in receiving respective care. This leaves local officials helpless on how these ideals can be actualized. Some cities have inclined to build huge older people homes and pour resources into institutional care, forgetting the need for older people to be connected with the society. This paper reviews the historical developments of older people services in Hong Kong and recommends an integrative model of social work services connecting institutional, community and home care into a seamless network. The city of Zhuhai will be presented as a perfect experimental city on how its existing facilities can be converted and developed according to the model. Survey on the situations of the 16 public older people homes will be used to illustrate the potentials of an integrative model.

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