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Search Results: 1 - 9 of 9 matches for " Chumney "
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The effects of pharmacist interventions on patients with polypharmacy
Chumney EC,Robinson LC
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2006,
Abstract: Polypharmacy, the state of being prescribed or taking more medications than clinically appropriate, can result in a variety of negative outcomes for both patients and healthcare facilities. These include negative outcomes such as adverse drug effects, hospitalizations, and poor patient health, as well as economic outcomes such as increased drug cost and costs associated with increased utilization of health services. Available data suggests pharmacists have the potential to have a large effect in combating this problem through a variety of interventions such as reducing the number of medications taken, reducing the number of doses taken, increasing patient adherence, preventing adverse drug reactions (ADRs), improving patient quality of life and decreasing facility and drug costs. A small number of studies have been performed on the pharmacists’ role in addressing the problem of polypharmacy; however, they include various populations, settings, and measured outcomes. Furthermore, some of the results are conflicting. Nonetheless, this review of the available literature concludes that pharmacist interventions can improve patient outcomes. With the ever-increasing costs of healthcare, the substantial cost savings for patients as well as institutions provided by these interventions are further justification for widespread implementation of pharmacist interventions at healthcare institutions.
Results on Lambda Production at HERMES
HERMES Collaboration,P. Chumney
Physics , 1997,
Abstract: The production of Lambda^0's at the HERMES experiment is presented. Prospects for the future of Lambda measurements at HERMES are discussed.
Efectos de las intervenciones del farmacéutico en pacientes polimedicados
Chumney,Elinor C.; Robinson,Leslie C.;
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2006, DOI: 10.4321/S1885-642X2006000300001
Abstract: polypharmacy, the state of being prescribed or taking more medications than clinically appropriate, can result in a variety of negative outcomes for both patients and healthcare facilities. these include negative outcomes such as adverse drug effects, hospitalizations, and poor patient health, as well as economic outcomes such as increased drug cost and costs associated with increased utilization of health services. available data suggests pharmacists have the potential to have a large effect in combating this problem through a variety of interventions such as reducing the number of medications taken, reducing the number of doses taken, increasing patient adherence, preventing adverse drug reactions (adrs), improving patient quality of life and decreasing facility and drug costs. a small number of studies have been performed on the pharmacists? role in addressing the problem of polypharmacy; however, they include various populations, settings, and measured outcomes. furthermore, some of the results are conflicting. nonetheless, this review of the available literature concludes that pharmacist interventions can improve patient outcomes. with the ever-increasing costs of healthcare, the substantial cost savings for patients as well as institutions provided by these interventions are further justification for widespread implementation of pharmacist interventions at healthcare institutions.
Assessment of patient knowledge of diabetic goals, self-reported medication adherence, and goal attainment
Whitley HP,Fermo JD,Ragucci K,Chumney EC
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2006,
Abstract: Background: Medication adherence is an integral aspect of disease state management for patients with chronic illnesses, including diabetes mellitus. It has been hypothesized that patients with diabetes who have poor medication adherence may have less knowledge of overall therapeutic goals and may be less likely to attain these goals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess self-reported medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals (hemoglobin A1C [A1C], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] and blood pressure [BP]), and goal attainment in adult patients with diabetes. Methods: A survey was created to assess medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals, and goal attainment for adult patients with diabetes followed at an internal medicine or a family medicine clinic. Surveys were self-administered prior to office visits. Additional data were collected from the electronic medical record. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were enrolled. Knowledge of therapeutic goals was reported by 14%, 34%, and 18% of survived patients for LDL-C, BP, and A1C, respectively. Forty-six percent, 37%, and 40% of patients achieved LDL-C, BP, and A1C goals, respectively. Low prescribing of cholesterol-lowering medications was an interesting secondary finding; 36% of patients not at LDL-C goal had not been prescribed a medication targeted to lower cholesterol. Forty-eight percent of patients were medication non-adherent; most frequently reported reasons for non-adherence were forgot (34%) and too expensive (14%). Patients at A1C goal were more adherent than patients not at goal (p=0.025). Conclusion: The majority did not reach goals and were unknowledgeable of goals; however, most were provided prescriptions to treat these parameters. Goal parameters should be revisited often amongst multidisciplinary team members with frequent and open communications. Additionally, it is imperative that practitioners discuss the importance of medication adherence with every patient at every visit.
Impact of clinical pharmacist intervention on diabetes related quality-of-life in an ambulatory care clinic
Jennings DL,Ragucci KR,Chumney ECG,Wessell AM
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2007,
Abstract: The purpose of this one-year observational study was to evaluate quality of life in patients at the Medical University of South Carolina Family Medicine clinic who were followed by a clinical pharmacist diabetes educator.Methods: Patients who have been seen by the clinical pharmacist for diabetes education and management services were contacted by telephone and asked to complete a previously validated Diabetes-related Quality of Life (DRQL) survey. In addition, the patient’s most recent hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure, fasting lipid panel and aspirin use were obtained from the electronic medical record. Correlation and logistic regression analysis was completed in order to assess the quality of life score and clinical outcomes.Results: A total of 47 patients completed the survey (37%). The median overall score was 1 (1-very satisfied; 5-very dissatisfied). Patients who were more satisfied with their current treatment tended to have lower LDL, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) values (r=0.32, 0.3, 0.33; p=0.03, 0.03, 0.02). In addition, patients taking more medications were more dissatisfied with the amount of time spent managing their disease (r=0.29, p=0.04), felt more pain associated with the treatment of their disease (r=0.32, p=0.02), and were more worried that their body looked different as a result of their diabetes (r=0.32, p=0.02). Conclusion: Patients in this clinic were highly satisfied with their quality of life. The authors found that trends exist for relationships between several important clinical parameters and quality of life.
Impact of clinical pharmacist intervention on diabetes related quality-of-life in an ambulatory care clinic
Jennings,Douglas L.; Ragucci,Kelly R.; Chumney,Elinor CG.; Wessell,Andrea M.;
Pharmacy Practice (Internet) , 2007, DOI: 10.4321/S1886-36552007000400005
Abstract: the purpose of this one-year observational study was to evaluate quality of life in patients at the medical university of south carolina family medicine clinic who were followed by a clinical pharmacist diabetes educator. methods: patients who have been seen by the clinical pharmacist for diabetes education and management services were contacted by telephone and asked to complete a previously validated diabetes-related quality of life (drql) survey. in addition, the patient's most recent hemoglobin a1c, blood pressure, fasting lipid panel and aspirin use were obtained from the electronic medical record. correlation and logistic regression analysis was completed in order to assess the quality of life score and clinical outcomes. results: a total of 47 patients completed the survey (37%). the median overall score was 1 (1-very satisfied; 5-very dissatisfied). patients who were more satisfied with their current treatment tended to have lower ldl, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (bp) values (r=0.32, 0.3, 0.33; p=0.03, 0.03, 0.02). in addition, patients taking more medications were more dissatisfied with the amount of time spent managing their disease (r=0.29, p=0.04), felt more pain associated with the treatment of their disease (r=0.32, p=0.02), and were more worried that their body looked different as a result of their diabetes (r=0.32, p=0.02). conclusion: patients in this clinic were highly satisfied with their quality of life. the authors found that trends exist for relationships between several important clinical parameters and quality of life.
Assessment of patient knowledge of diabetic goals, self-reported medication adherence, and goal attainment
Whitley,Heather P.; Fermo,Joli D.; Ragucci,Kelly; Chumney,Elinor C.;
Pharmacy Practice (Granada) , 2006, DOI: 10.4321/S1885-642X2006000400006
Abstract: background: medication adherence is an integral aspect of disease state management for patients with chronic illnesses, including diabetes mellitus. it has been hypothesized that patients with diabetes who have poor medication adherence may have less knowledge of overall therapeutic goals and may be less likely to attain these goals. objective: the purpose of this study was to assess self-reported medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals (hemoglobin a1c [a1c], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [ldl-c] and blood pressure [bp]), and goal attainment in adult patients with diabetes. methods: a survey was created to assess medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals, and goal attainment for adult patients with diabetes followed at an internal medicine or a family medicine clinic. surveys were self-administered prior to office visits. additional data were collected from the electronic medical record. statistical analysis was performed. results: a total of 149 patients were enrolled. knowledge of therapeutic goals was reported by 14%, 34%, and 18% of survived patients for ldl-c, bp, and a1c, respectively. forty-six percent, 37%, and 40% of patients achieved ldl-c, bp, and a1c goals, respectively. low prescribing of cholesterol-lowering medications was an interesting secondary finding; 36% of patients not at ldl-c goal had not been prescribed a medication targeted to lower cholesterol. forty-eight percent of patients were medication non-adherent; most frequently reported reasons for non-adherence were forgot (34%) and too expensive (14%). patients at a1c goal were more adherent than patients not at goal (p=0.025). conclusion: the majority did not reach goals and were unknowledgeable of goals; however, most were provided prescriptions to treat these parameters. goal parameters should be revisited often amongst multidisciplinary team members with frequent and open communications. additionally, it is imperative that practitioners discuss the importance o
Ability of Functional Independence Measure to accurately predict functional outcome of stroke-specific population: Systematic review
Douglas Chumney, DPT, PT,Kristen Nollinger, DPT, PT,Kristina Shesko, DPT, PT,Karen Skop, DPT, PT
Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development , 2010, DOI: 10.1682/jrrd.2009.08.0140
Abstract: Stroke is a leading cause of functional impairments. The ability to quantify the functional ability of poststroke patients engaged in a rehabilitation program may assist in prediction of their functional outcome. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM) is widely used and accepted as a functional-level assessment tool that evaluates the functional status of patients throughout the rehabilitation process. From February to March 2009, we searched MEDLINE, Ovid, CINAHL, and EBSCO for full-text articles written in English. Article inclusion criteria consisted of civilian and veteran patients posthemorrhagic and ischemic stroke with an average age of 50 years or older who participated in an inpatient rehabilitation program. Articles rated 5 or higher on the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scale were analyzed, including one cluster randomized trial and five cohort studies. Descriptive and psychometric data were outlined for each study. Key findings, clinical usefulness of the FIM, potential biases, and suggestions for further research were summarized. Although limited, evidence exists that FIM scores can be used as an accurate predictor of outcomes in poststroke patients.
Level-1 Regional Calorimeter Trigger System for CMS
P. Chumney,S. Dasu,J. Lackey,M. Jaworski,P. Robl,W. H. Smith
Physics , 2003,
Abstract: The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) calorimeter regional trigger system is designed to detect signatures of isolated and non-isolated electrons/photons, jets, ?-leptons, and missing and total transverse energy using a deadtimeless pipelined architecture. This system contains 18 crates of custom-built electronics. The pre-production prototype backplane, boards, links and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) have been built and their performance is characterized.
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