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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3183 matches for " Christina Hamlet "
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A numerical study of the effects of bell pulsation dynamics and oral arms on the exchange currents generated by the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea spp
Christina Hamlet,Arvind Santhanakrishnan,Laura A. Miller
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: Mathematical and experimental studies of the flows generated by jellyfish have focused primarily on mechanisms of swimming. More recent work has also considered the fluid dynamics of feeding from currents generated during swimming. Here the benthic lifestyle of the upside down jellyfish (Cassiopea spp.) is capitalized upon to explore the fluids dynamics of feeding uncoupled from swimming. A mathematical model is developed to capture the fundamental characteristics of the motion of the unique concave bell shape. Given the prominence of the oral arms, this structure is included and modeled as a porous layer that perturbs the flow generated by bell contractions. The immersed boundary method is used to solve the fluid-structure interaction problem. Velocity fields obtained from live organisms using digital particle image velocimetry were used to validate the numerical simulations. Parameter sweeps were used to numerically explore the effects of changes in pulse dynamics and the properties of the oral arms independently. Numerical experiments allow the opportunity to examine physical effects and limits within and beyond the biologically relevant range to develop a better understanding of the system. The presence of the prominent oral arm structure in the field of flow increased the flux of new fluid from along the substrate to the bell. The numerical simulations also showed that the presence of pauses between bell expansion and the next contraction alters the flow of the fluid over the bell and through the oral arms.
Feeding Currents Generated by Upside Down Jellyfish
Terry Rodriguez,Christina Hamlet,Megan Gyoerkoe,Laura Miller
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: We present fluid dynamics videos of the pulsing dynamics and the resulting fluid flow generated by the upside down jellyfish, Cassiopea spp. Medusae of this genus are unusual in that they typically rest upside down on the ocean floor and pulse their bells to generate feeding currents, only swimming when significantly disturbed. The pulsing kinematics and fluid flow around these upside down jellyfish is investigated using a combination of videography, flow visualization, and numerical simulation. Significant mixing occurs around and directly above the oral arms and secondary mouths. Numerical simulations using the immersed boundary method with a porous layer representing the oral arms agree with the experimental results. The simulations also suggest that the presence of porous oral arms induce net horizontal flow towards the bell. Coherent vortex rings are not seen in the wake above the jellyfish, but starting and stopping vortices are observed before breaking up as they pass through the elaborate oral arms (if extended).
Current-driven Flow across a Stationary Jellyfish
Christina Hamlet,Laura Miller,Roger Fan,Makani Dollinger,Steve Harenber
Physics , 2011,
Abstract: We present several dye visualization and numerical simulation fluid dynamics videos of a sessile jellyfish subjected to channel flow. The low resolution video and the high resolution video display the vortex patterns in different channel flows. This description accompanies the video submission V038 to the 2011 APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion.
Tight holomorphic maps, a classification
Oskar Hamlet
Mathematics , 2011,
Abstract: We classify all tight holomorphic maps between Hermitian symmetric spaces of non-compact type.
Tight maps and holomorphicity
Oskar Hamlet
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: Tight maps was introduced along tight homomorphisms by Burger, Iozzi and Wienhard with aims towards maximal representations. In this paper we classify tight maps into classical Hermitian symmetric spaces and give a partial result for the exceptional spaces.
Acordes arrítmicos del color de la piel del bailarín de la Escuela Cubana de Ballet
Betancourt León, Hamlet;
Cuicuilco , 2009,
Abstract: the color of the skin is a class within the systemic model of the body of the cuban ballet dancer. many cubans, who are not dancers, consider the color of the skin like one of the main characteristics to be taken in account to enter and to successfully remain in the ballet field. the objective of this research paper is to determine the impact of the skin color in the appreciation of the scenic body beauty of the ballet dancer within the cuban field. the empirical evidences, over which the thesis and interpretations stand, arise from a five year long period of ethnographical fieldwork among the main institutions of the cuban ballet field. the color of the skin integrates hierarchically the evaluation of the scenic corporal beauty of the cuban dancer realized by a sector of the social field and no other considers it. the kind of skin color discrimination was expressed by depreciating the scenic body beauty of black and brown dancers of cuban field compared to the white skin dancers. the facts pointed out frequently practices of kind of skin color discrimination at the professional area than for student system in the social field.
Assessing water resources adaptive capacity to climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest Region of North America
A. F. Hamlet
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS) & Discussions (HESSD) , 2011,
Abstract: Climate change impacts in Pacific Northwest Region of North America (PNW) are projected to include increasing temperatures and changes in the seasonality of precipitation (increasing precipitation in winter, decreasing precipitation in summer). Changes in precipitation are also spatially varying, with the northwestern parts of the region generally experiencing greater increases in cool season precipitation than the southeastern parts. These changes in climate are projected to cause loss of snowpack and associated streamflow timing shifts which will increase cool season (October–March) flows and decrease warm season (April–September) flows and water availability. Hydrologic extremes such as the 100 yr flood and extreme low flows are also expected to change, although these impacts are not spatially homogeneous and vary with mid-winter temperatures and other factors. These changes have important implications for natural ecosystems affected by water, and for human systems. The PNW is endowed with extensive water resources infrastructure and well-established and well-funded management agencies responsible for ensuring that water resources objectives (such as water supply, water quality, flood control, hydropower production, environmental services, etc.) are met. Likewise, access to observed hydrological, meteorological, and climatic data and forecasts is in general exceptionally good in the United States and Canada, and is often supported by federally funded programs that ensure that these resources are freely available to water resources practitioners, policy makers, and the general public. Access to these extensive resources support the argument that at a technical level the PNW has high capacity to deal with the potential impacts of natural climate variability on water resources. To the extent that climate change will manifest itself as moderate changes in variability or extremes, we argue that existing water resources infrastructure and institutional arrangements provide a reasonably solid foundation for coping with climate change impacts, and that the mandates of existing water resources policy and water resources management institutions are at least consistent with the fundamental objectives of climate change adaptation. A deeper inquiry into the underlying nature of PNW water resources systems, however, reveals significant and persistent obstacles to climate change adaptation, which will need to be overcome if effective use of the region's extensive water resources management capacity can be brought to bear on this problem. Primary obstacles include assumptions of stationarity as the fundamental basis of water resources system design, entrenched use of historical records as the sole basis for planning, problems related to the relatively short time scale of planning, lack of familiarity with climate science and models, downscaling procedures, and hydrologic models, limited access to climate change scenarios and hydrologic products for specific w
Assessing water resources adaptive capacity to climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest Region of North America
A. F. Hamlet
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/hessd-7-4437-2010
Abstract: Climate change impacts in Pacific Northwest Region of North America (PNW) are projected to include increasing temperatures and changes in the seasonality of precipitation (increasing precipitation in winter, decreasing precipitation in summer). Changes in precipitation are also spatially varying, with the northwestern parts of the region generally experiencing greater increases in cool season precipitation than the southeastern parts. These changes in climate are projected to cause loss of snowpack and associated streamflow timing shifts which will increase cool season (October–March) flows and decrease warm season (April–September) flows and water availability. Hydrologic extremes such as the 100 year flood and extreme low flows are also expected to change, although these impacts are not spatially homogeneous and vary with mid-winter temperatures and other factors. These changes have important implications for natural ecosystems affected by water, and for human systems. The PNW is endowed with extensive water resources infrastructure and well-established and well-funded management agencies responsible for ensuring that water resources objectives (such as water supply, water quality, flood control, hydropower production, environmental services, etc.) are met. Likewise, access to observed hydrological, meteorological, and climatic data and forecasts is in general exceptionally good in the United States and Canada, and access to these products and services is often supported by federally funded programs that ensure that these resources are available to water resources practitioners, policy makers, and the general public. Access to these extensive resources support the argument that at a technical level the PNW has high capacity to deal with the potential impacts of natural climate variability on water resources. To the extent that climate change will manifest itself as moderate changes in variability or extremes, we argue that existing water resources infrastructure and institutional arrangements provide a solid foundation for coping with climate change impacts, and that the mandates of existing water resources policy and water resources management institutions are at least consistent with the fundamental objectives of climate change adaptation. A deeper inquiry into the underlying nature of PNW water resources systems, however, reveals significant and persistent obstacles to climate change adaptation, which will need to be overcome if effective use of the region's extensive water resources management capacity can be brought to bear on this problem. Primar
Tight maps and holomorphicity, exceptional spaces
Oskar Hamlet,Takayuki Okuda
Mathematics , 2014,
Abstract: We show that there are no tight nonholomorphic maps from irreducible domains into exceptional codomains, the only exception being the already known tight nonholomorphic maps from the Poincare disc. This follows up on previous work by the first author where this was shown for classical codomains.
La construcción de los conocimientos psicoterapéuticos durante la práctica profesional del psicólogo
López García,Hamlet;
Humanidades M??dicas , 2009,
Abstract: this article presents a qualitative research within the framework of the social studies of science. this research aims to describe how psychotherapeutic knowledge is constructed. thus, six experienced specialists were interviewed. results confirm the construction of psychotherapeutic knowledge through a constant process of reflection and elaboration of professional practice, in a continuously critical dialogue using theoretical and practical references permanently updated by practice. although being particular, these results provide valuable suggestions about the formation of psychotherapists.
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