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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 27737 matches for " Chia-Ying Chung "
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A Real-Time Model-Based Human Motion Tracking and Analysis for Human-Computer Interface Systems
Huang Chung-Lin,Chung Chia-Ying
EURASIP Journal on Advances in Signal Processing , 2004,
Abstract: This paper introduces a real-time model-based human motion tracking and analysis method for human computer interface (HCI). This method tracks and analyzes the human motion from two orthogonal views without using any markers. The motion parameters are estimated by pattern matching between the extracted human silhouette and the human model. First, the human silhouette is extracted and then the body definition parameters (BDPs) can be obtained. Second, the body animation parameters (BAPs) are estimated by a hierarchical tritree overlapping searching algorithm. To verify the performance of our method, we demonstrate different human posture sequences and use hidden Markov model (HMM) for posture recognition testing.
Clinical Analysis of 1048 Children with Developmental Delay
I-Chun Chen,Chia-Ling Chen,May-Kuen Wong,Chia-Ying Chung
Chang Gung Medical Journal , 2002,
Abstract: Background: Children with developmental delay (DD) have a variety of problems indevelopmental functions. The purposes of this study were to analyze theunderlying diseases and risk factors in children with different functionaldelays.Methods: We collected data on 1048 children who underwent assessments of developmentalfunction, related diseases, and risk factors. All children were classifiedinto 6 functional delay groups: cognitive, speech, motor, pervasive,global, and non-specific DDs. Differences in related diseases and risk factorsof the 6 functional delay groups were determined.Results: Most children had global (51.2%), speech (21.9%), and motor (13.9%)delays. Approximately 62.8% of children were associated with biologicalfactors (19% with genetic defects or congenital anomalies, 16.5% with centralnervous system lesions, 13.9% with prematurity/low birth body weight,and 13.4% with neonatal insult). We could not identify the risk factors in36.6% of the children. Most children with motor delay had brain/neuromusculardiseases and were associated with risks of prematurity or low birthbody weight; while most children with global delay had brain neuromusculardiseases or psychological/mental disorders and were associated with risks ofgenetic defects or congenital anomalies.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that there are heterogeneous risk factors and related diseasesin children with different kinds of functional delay.
Relationship between Unstimulated Salivary Flow Rate and Saliva Composition of Healthy Children in Taiwan
Katie P. Wu,Jyh-Yuh Ke,Chia-Ying Chung,Chia-Ling Chen
Chang Gung Medical Journal , 2008,
Abstract: Background: Saliva is one of the most important factors in regulating oral health, withflow rate and composition changing throughout development and during disease.In view of the shortage of data, the present study aimed to shed light onthe relationship between unstimulated salivary flow rate and saliva compositionof healthy children in Taiwan.Methods: Forty-four normal, healthy children from 3-14 years of age were divided intothree age groups: pre-school, elementary school and junior-high school. Allparticipants received salivary flow rate, pH and saliva composition analysisunder unstimulated conditions. One-way ANOVA and Pearson’s correlationwere used. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05.Results: Our results suggest that, under unstimulated conditions, the salivary flow rateof the elementary school group was greater than that of the pre-school group(p < 0.05). No difference in pH was found among the three groups. Intergroupsalivary calcium, phosphorus and amylase did not reach statistical difference.As the flow rate increased, the pH increased (r = 0.364, p < 0.05)but the protein level decreased (r = –0.473, p < 0.05). In addition, salivaryprotein was positively correlated to age (r = 0.479, p < 0.05) and negativelycorrelated to pH (r = –0.361, p < 0.01).Conclusion: Age-related increase in the unstimulated salivary flow rate of pre-school andelementary school groups was noted. As the flow rate increased, the pHincreased but the protein level decreased. The information obtained mayserve as reference values for the growing interest in saliva as a diagnostictool, especially monitoring those with neurological or oral motor dysfunction.
Divergent Selection and Local Adaptation in Disjunct Populations of an Endangered Conifer, Keteleeria davidiana var. formosana (Pinaceae)
Jing-Yu Fang, Jeng-Der Chung, Yu-Chung Chiang, Chung-Te Chang, Chia-Ying Chen, Shih-Ying Hwang
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070162
Abstract: The present study investigated the genetic diversity, population structure, FST outliers, and extent and pattern of linkage disequilibrium in five populations of Keteleeria davidiana var. formosana, which is listed as a critically endangered species by the Council of Agriculture, Taiwan. Twelve amplified fragment length polymorphism primer pairs generated a total of 465 markers, of which 83.74% on average were polymorphic across populations, with a mean Nei’s genetic diversity of 0.233 and a low level of genetic differentiation (approximately 6%) based on the total dataset. Linkage disequilibrium and HICKORY analyses suggested recent population bottlenecks and inbreeding in K. davidiana var. formosana. Both STRUCTURE and BAPS observed extensive admixture of individual genotypes among populations based on the total dataset in various clustering scenarios, which probably resulted from incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral variation rather than a high rate of recent gene flow. Our results based on outlier analysis revealed generally high levels of genetic differentiation and suggest that divergent selection arising from environmental variation has been driven by differences in temperature, precipitation, and humidity. Identification of ecologically associated outliers among environmentally disparate populations further support divergent selection and potential local adaptation.
The validity of the type d construct and its assessment in Taiwan
Chia-Ying Weng, Johan Denollet, Chin-Lon Lin, Tin-Kwang Lin, Wen-Chung Wang, Jyun-Ji Lin, Shu-Shu Wong, Floortje Mols
BMC Psychiatry , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/1471-244x-13-46
Abstract: CAD patients (N = 87) and adults from the general population (N = 421) completed the 14-item Type D Scale- Taiwanese version (DS14-T), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Chinese Hostility Inventory Short-Form.Based on the psychometric examination, item #3 of the original DS14, "I often talk to strangers" was replaced by "I don't like to have a lot of people around me" which comes from the "Withdrawal" facet of social inhibition of DS-24. The reliability of Type D assessment in Taiwan was good, with Cronbach's alpha for negative affectivity and social inhibition of .86 and .79. Factor analyses confirmed the two-factor model of the Type D construct. The prevalence rate of Type D personality in Taiwan was 20% in CAD patients and 16% in the general population. Negative affectivity was positively associated with anxiety, depression and hostility, and social inhibition was positively associated with suppressive hostility and negatively associated with expressive hostility after controlling for the total hostility. Furthermore, Taiwanese individuals with a Type D personality displayed elevated levels of anxiety, depression and hostility.The Type D construct and its assessment with the DS14-T is generalizable to an Asian setting, Taiwan. The DS14-T showed good psychometric properties, and the prevalence of Type D personality in Taiwan was similar to the prevalence rates in Western countries and Mainland China, and Type D was associated with anxiety, depression and hostility.
A Novel Prokaryotic Promoter Identified in the Genome of Some Monopartite Begomoviruses
Wei-Chen Wang, Yau-Heiu Hsu, Na-Sheng Lin, Chia-Ying Wu, Yi-Chin Lai, Chung-Chi Hu
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070037
Abstract: Geminiviruses are known to exhibit both prokaryotic and eukaryotic features in their genomes, with the ability to express their genes and even replicate in bacterial cells. We have demonstrated previously the existence of unit-length single-stranded circular DNAs of Ageratum yellow vein virus (AYVV, a species in the genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) in Escherichia coli cells, which prompted our search for unknown prokaryotic functions in the begomovirus genomes. By using a promoter trapping strategy, we identified a novel prokaryotic promoter, designated AV3 promoter, in nts 762-831 of the AYVV genome. Activity assays revealed that the AV3 promoter is strong, unidirectional, and constitutive, with an endogenous downstream ribosome binding site and a translatable short open reading frame of eight amino acids. Sequence analyses suggested that the AV3 promoter might be a remnant of prokaryotic ancestors that could be related to certain promoters of bacteria from marine or freshwater environments. The discovery of the prokaryotic AV3 promoter provided further evidence for the prokaryotic origin in the evolutionary history of geminiviruses.
Interaction between NBS1 and the mTOR/Rictor/SIN1 Complex through Specific Domains
Jian-Qiu Wang, Jian-Hong Chen, Yen-Chung Chen, Mei-Yu Chen, Chia-Ying Hsieh, Shu-Chun Teng, Kou-Juey Wu
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065586
Abstract: Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a chromosomal-instability syndrome. The NBS gene product, NBS1 (p95 or nibrin), is a part of the Mre11-Rad50-NBS1 complex. SIN1 is a component of the mTOR/Rictor/SIN1 complex mediating the activation of Akt. Here we show that NBS1 interacted with mTOR, Rictor, and SIN1. The specific domains of mTOR, Rictor, or SIN1 interacted with the internal domain (a.a. 221-402) of NBS1. Sucrose density gradient showed that NBS1 was located in the same fractions as the mTOR/Rictor/SIN1 complex. Knockdown of NBS1 decreased the levels of phosphorylated Akt and its downstream targets. Ionizing radiation (IR) increased the NBS1 levels and activated Akt activity. These results demonstrate that NBS1 interacts with the mTOR/Rictor/SIN1 complex through the a.a. 221–402 domain and contributes to the activation of Akt activity.
Advancements in Suppression of Osteosarcoma Tumorigenicity: A Prospective Look  [PDF]
Lin Wang, Paul Park, Frank La Marca, Khoi Than, Shayan Rahman, Chia-Ying Lin
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2012.34042
Abstract: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote differentiation of stem cells into bone cells. Results from our pilot studies indicate these proteins are also capable of inducing the differentiation of stem-like cells that initiate and propagate osteosarcoma, a rare, highly malignant primary bone tumor affecting primarily children and adolescents. Our plans to evaluate the use of BMP as adjuvant therapy to suppress bone tumor while facilitating skeletal reconstruction are reviewed.
Translation Repression in Human Cells by MicroRNA-Induced Gene Silencing Requires RCK/p54
Chia-ying Chu,Tariq M. Rana
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0040210
Abstract: RNA interference is triggered by double-stranded RNA that is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by Dicer enzyme. Endogenously, RNA interference triggers are created from small noncoding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs). RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) in human cells can be programmed by exogenously introduced siRNA or endogenously expressed miRNA. siRNA-programmed RISC (siRISC) silences expression by cleaving a perfectly complementary target mRNA, whereas miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) inhibits translation by binding imperfectly matched sequences in the 3′ UTR of target mRNA. Both RISCs contain Argonaute2 (Ago2), which catalyzes target mRNA cleavage by siRISC and localizes to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies). Here, we show that RCK/p54, a DEAD box helicase, interacts with argonaute proteins, Ago1 and Ago2, in affinity-purified active siRISC or miRISC from human cells; directly interacts with Ago1 and Ago2 in vivo, facilitates formation of P-bodies, and is a general repressor of translation. Disrupting P-bodies by depleting Lsm1 did not affect RCK/p54 interactions with argonaute proteins and its function in miRNA-mediated translation repression. Depletion of RCK/p54 disrupted P-bodies and dispersed Ago2 throughout the cytoplasm but did not significantly affect siRNA-mediated RNA functions of RISC. Depleting RCK/p54 released general, miRNA-induced, and let-7-mediated translational repression. Therefore, we propose that translation repression is mediated by miRISC via RCK/p54 and its specificity is dictated by the miRNA sequence binding multiple copies of miRISC to complementary 3′ UTR sites in the target mRNA. These studies also suggest that translation suppression by miRISC does not require P-body structures, and location of miRISC to P-bodies is the consequence of translation repression.
Translation Repression in Human Cells by MicroRNA-Induced Gene Silencing Requires RCK/p54
Chia-ying Chu,Tariq M Rana
PLOS Biology , 2006, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0040210
Abstract: RNA interference is triggered by double-stranded RNA that is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by Dicer enzyme. Endogenously, RNA interference triggers are created from small noncoding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs). RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) in human cells can be programmed by exogenously introduced siRNA or endogenously expressed miRNA. siRNA-programmed RISC (siRISC) silences expression by cleaving a perfectly complementary target mRNA, whereas miRNA-induced silencing complexes (miRISC) inhibits translation by binding imperfectly matched sequences in the 3′ UTR of target mRNA. Both RISCs contain Argonaute2 (Ago2), which catalyzes target mRNA cleavage by siRISC and localizes to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies). Here, we show that RCK/p54, a DEAD box helicase, interacts with argonaute proteins, Ago1 and Ago2, in affinity-purified active siRISC or miRISC from human cells; directly interacts with Ago1 and Ago2 in vivo, facilitates formation of P-bodies, and is a general repressor of translation. Disrupting P-bodies by depleting Lsm1 did not affect RCK/p54 interactions with argonaute proteins and its function in miRNA-mediated translation repression. Depletion of RCK/p54 disrupted P-bodies and dispersed Ago2 throughout the cytoplasm but did not significantly affect siRNA-mediated RNA functions of RISC. Depleting RCK/p54 released general, miRNA-induced, and let-7-mediated translational repression. Therefore, we propose that translation repression is mediated by miRISC via RCK/p54 and its specificity is dictated by the miRNA sequence binding multiple copies of miRISC to complementary 3′ UTR sites in the target mRNA. These studies also suggest that translation suppression by miRISC does not require P-body structures, and location of miRISC to P-bodies is the consequence of translation repression.
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