oalib

OALib Journal期刊

ISSN: 2333-9721

费用:99美元

投稿

时间不限

2019 ( 40 )

2018 ( 274 )

2017 ( 298 )

2016 ( 378 )

自定义范围…

匹配条件: “Charumathi K” ,找到相关结果约138541条。
列表显示的所有文章,均可免费获取
第1页/共138541条
每页显示
Antibacterial activity of plants used in Indian herbal medicine
Pavithra P,Janani V,Charumathi K,Indumathy R
International Journal of Green Pharmacy , 2010,
Abstract: Delonix elata , Enicostemma axillare, Merremia tridentata, Mollugo cerviana and Solanum incanum are medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments. These plants were selected to evaluate their potential antibacterial activity. To determine antibacterial activity and phytochemicals in the crude extracts of five medicinal plants used in traditional Indian medicine for the treatment of various ailments like rheumatism, piles fever, skin diseases and snake bite. The antibacterial activity of organic solvent extracts of these plants were determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution techniques against gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Results revealed that the chloroform and methanol extracts of D. elata and methanol extracts of M. cerviana exhibited significant antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative strains with minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) ranging from 1.5 to 100 mg/ml. Methanol extracts of M. tridentata exhibited activity only against gram-positive bacterial strains with MBC ranging from 12.5 to 100 mg/ml. Extracts of E. axillare and S. incanum showed activity only against B. subtilis and were not bactericidal at 100 mg/ml. The most susceptible organism to the organic extracts from all the studied plants was B. subtilis and the most resistant organism was P. aeruginosa. The presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, tannins, triterpenoids, steroids and glycosides in the extracts of these plants supports their traditional uses as medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. The present study reveals potential use of these plants for developing new antibacterial compounds against pathogenic microorganisms.
On the Determinants of Interest Rate Swap Usage by Indian Banks
B. Charumathi
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2009,
Abstract:
On the Determinants of Profitability of Indian Life Insurers - An Empirical Study
B. Charumathi
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract:
Asset Liability Management in Indian Banking Industry - with special reference to Interest Rate Risk Management in ICICI Bank
Dr. B. Charumathi
Lecture Notes in Engineering and Computer Science , 2008,
Abstract:
REMOVAL OF SYNTHETIC DYE BASIC VIOLET 3 BY IMMOBILISED CANDIDA TROPICALIS GROWN ON SUGARCANE BAGASSE EXTRACT MEDIUM
D.CHARUMATHI,NILANJANA DAS
International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: The removal of synthetic dye Basic Violet 3 using immobilised yeast Candida tropicalis grown on sugarcane bagasse extract medium was investigated. The various immobilization matrices viz. carboxymethyl cellulose, sodium alginate, agar, agarose and polyvinyl alcohol were tested and highest dye removal efficiency (99%) was noted in sodium alginate immobilised beads. The concentration of sodium alginate, bead size and cell concentration were optimized as 3%, 2mm and 3x 106 cells/g bead respectively. The mechanism of dye removal using immobilised yeast cells was elucidated and bioaccumulation was found to be the predominant mechanism over biosorption. The growth of yeast was inhibited completely at higher dye concentration ( >50 mg/l ).Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images confirmed the toxic effect of dye on immobilised C.tropicalis. This is the first report on dye removal using the immobilized yeast cells which could lead to practical application for removal of color from industrial wastewater.
Markers of Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Metabolic Syndrome in a Multiethnic Sample of US Adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008
Charumathi Sabanayagam,Ruoxin Zhang,Anoop Shankar
Cardiology Research and Practice , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/630802
Abstract: Previous studies have documented an association between markers of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and metabolic syndrome. However, it is not clear if there are gender or ethnic differences in this association. We examined 6,122 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–08. Metabolic syndrome was defined as the presence of ≥3 of the following components: (1) abdominal obesity, (2) elevated blood triglycerides, (3) low HDL cholesterol, (4) high BP, and (5) hyperglycemia. SDB severity was defined based on an additive summary score including sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. We found that short sleep duration, snoring, snorting, daytime sleepiness and the summary SDB score were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome independent of potential confounders. Compared to those without any sleep disturbance, the multivariable odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval [CI]) of metabolic syndrome among those with three or more sleep disturbances was 3.92 (2.98–5.16). In subgroup analyses, this association was consistently present among men and women and all race-ethnic groups. In summary, SDB was independently associated with metabolic syndrome in a nationally representative sample of US adults. 1. Introduction Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is a common condition affecting 1 in 5 adults in the USA and is associated with metabolic abnormalities including diabetes [1, 2], hypertension [3], and obesity [4]. Metabolic syndrome, a constellation of metabolic abnormalities including obesity, high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia is an established risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease [5]. Previous studies have documented an association between a variety of markers of SDB including snoring [6, 7], daytime sleepiness [7], or sleep duration [8] and metabolic syndrome or its components in the general population [9]. However, most of the studies that examined the association between SDB and metabolic syndrome assessed either a single marker of SDB [6, 8, 9] or separate components of metabolic syndrome [9]. Studies have also documented gender [10, 11] or ethnic differences [12, 13] in the prevalence of SDB. Men [10, 11] and African Americans [12, 13] were reported to have increased prevalence of SDB in the US. Similar differences in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome have been documented. In the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2006, non-Hispanic black men and women were reported to have higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than
Markers of Sleep Disordered Breathing and Diabetes Mellitus in a Multiethnic Sample of US Adults: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005–2008)
Charumathi Sabanayagam,Srinivas Teppala,Anoop Shankar
International Journal of Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/879134
Abstract: We examined gender and ethnic differences in the association between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and diabetes among 6,522 participants aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–08. SDB severity was defined based on an additive summary score including sleep duration, snoring, snorting, and daytime sleepiness. We found that the summary SDB score was significantly associated with diabetes after adjusting for potential confounders in the whole population. Compared to those without any sleep disturbance, the multivariable odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) of diabetes among those with ≥3 sleep disturbances was 2.04 (1.46–2.87). In sex-specific analyses, this association was significant only in women (OR (95% CI) = 3.68 (2.01–6.72)) but not in men (1.10 (0.59–2.04)), -interaction =0.01. However, there were no ethnic differences in this association, -interaction =0.7. In a nationally representative sample of US adults, SDB was independently associated with diabetes only in women, but not in men.
The Relationship between Insufficient Sleep and Self-Rated Health in a Nationally Representative Sample
Sarah Dee Geiger,Charumathi Sabanayagam,Anoop Shankar
Journal of Environmental and Public Health , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/518263
Abstract: Reduced sleep has been found to be associated with increased risk of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and mortality. Self-rated health (SRH) has been shown to be a predictor of CVD and mortality. However, study of the association between insufficient sleep and SRH is limited. We examined participants >18 years of age (=377, 160) from a representative, cross-sectional survey (2008 BRFSS). Self-reported insufficient sleep in the previous 30 days was categorized into six groups. The outcome was poor SRH. We calculated odds ratios ((OR) (95% confidence interval (CI)) of increasing categories of insufficient rest/sleep, taking zero days of insufficient sleep as the referent category. We found a positive association between increasing categories of insufficient sleep and poor SRH, independent of relevant covariates. In the multivariable-adjusted model, compared to 0 days insufficient sleep, the OR (95% CI) of poor SRH was 1.03 (0.97–1.10) for 1–6 days, 1.45 (1.34–1.57) for 7–13 days, 2.12 (1.97–2.27) for 14–20 days, 2.32 (2.09–2.58) for 21–29 days, and and 2.71 (2.53–2.90) for 30 days of insufficient sleep in the prior 30 days (P-trend <0.0001). In a nationally representative sample, increasing categories of insufficient sleep were associated with poor SRH.
Effect of pretreatment on Cd2+ biosorption by mycelial biomass of Pleurotus florida
N Das, D Charumathi, R Vimala
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2007,
Abstract: The effect of pretreatment on the Cd2+ biosorption capacity of mycelial biomass of Pleurotus florida was investigated. For this purpose, the biomass was subjected to physical treatments such as heat, autoclaving and freeze drying and chemical treatments using acids, alkali and organic solvents. All the pretreatment methods improved the biosorption of Cd2+ in comparison with live biomass of P. florida. Among physical treatments, freeze drying showed significant improvement in Cd2+ sorption capacity. Pretreatment of biomass with NaOH showed maximum cadmium biosorption followed by formaldehyde and methanol treatment.
Combined effects of sugarcane bagasse extract and Zinc(II) ions on the growth and bioaccumulation properties of yeast isolates.
Geetanjali Basak,CHARUMATHI D,NILANJANA DAS
International Journal of Engineering Science and Technology , 2011,
Abstract: Bioaccumulation of zinc(II) ions by yeast isolates viz. Candida rugosa and Cryptococcus laurentii was investigated in different growth media. Both the isolates showed maximum bioaccumulation of zinc(II) in the medium prepared from sugarcane bagasse extract. The growth and zinc(II) bioaccumulation properties of yeasts in sugar cane bagasse extract were tested as a function of pH, temperature and initial metal concentrations. The combined effects of sugar extracted from bagasse and initial zinc(II) ion concentrations on specific growth rate and bioaccumulation efficiencies of yeasts were investigated. At a constant zinc(II) concentration, the growthand zinc(II) bioaccumulation increased with increasing concentrations of sugar up to 24 g/L. The inhibition effect of zinc(II) ions on the specific growth rate of yeasts was studied by non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition models at various concentrations of zinc(II) ranging from 0-50 mg/L at constant sugar concentrations (8- 24 g/L). Bioaccumulation of zinc(II) by the yeast isolates followed first-order-reaction kinetics.
第1页/共138541条
每页显示


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.