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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 10716 matches for " Charles Riley "
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Tribute to the Memory of John Lawrence LeConte
Charles Valentine Riley
Psyche , 1883, DOI: 10.1155/1883/37519
Abstract:
Parasites of the Larva of Lachnosterna Fusca
Charles Valentine Riley
Psyche , 1884, DOI: 10.1155/1884/29465
Abstract:
Biological approaches for addressing the grand challenge of providing access to clean drinking water
Mark R Riley, Charles P Gerba, Menachem Elimelech
Journal of Biological Engineering , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1754-1611-5-2
Abstract: Water scarcity is a fact of life in arid and semi-arid regions where agricultural, domestic and industrial demands compete for limited resources. Access to clean drinking water presents a monumental challenge that is well documented for the developing world but is a rising problem for more established regions [1]. The problems for both locations are often presented in simplified form as being either a lack of water quantity or a lack of water quality; however, the reality is infrequently so straight-forward. The NAE Grand Challenge document http://www.engineeringchallenges.org/cms/8996/9142.aspx webcite states:"Lack of clean water is responsible for more deaths in the world than war. About 1 out of every 6 people living today do not have adequate access to water, and more than double that number lack basic sanitation, for which water is needed. In some countries, half the population does not have access to safe drinking water, and hence, is afflicted with poor health. By some estimates, each day nearly 5,000 children worldwide die from diarrhea-related diseases, a toll that would drop dramatically if sufficient water for sanitation was available."In the so-called developed world, an aging infrastructure plays a large role in problems of providing clean drinking water. Along much of the U.S. east coast, conveyance systems (pipes, pumps, valves, etc.) were designed for a 100-year life span, but were constructed in the middle 1800's. Much of the water infrastructure is of poor quality, which has led to substantial leakage of water and unaccounted-for water totaling one half of that initially introduced. In many cases drinking water pipes are located in close proximity to black water (wastewater) pipes. In a highly connected piping network, pressure can at times be either positive or negative relative to the surrounding water table. In a leaky system, drinking water can mix with a variety of water sources, thus providing one common route for introduction of microbial co
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reported Practices Among Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the USA Regarding Antibiotic Prescribing for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections
Shadi Chamany,Jay Schulkin,Charles E. Rose,Laura E. Riley
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2005, DOI: 10.1080/10647440400025579
Abstract: Background: Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) have not been well described among obstetrician-gynecologists (OB/GYNs). This information is useful for determining whether an OB/GYN-specific program promoting appropriate antibiotic use would significantly contribute to the efforts to decrease inappropriate antibiotic use among primary care providers.
Distribution of complexities in the Vai script
Andrij Rovenchak,Ján Ma?utek,Charles Riley
Computer Science , 2008,
Abstract: In the paper, we analyze the distribution of complexities in the Vai script, an indigenous syllabic writing system from Liberia. It is found that the uniformity hypothesis for complexities fails for this script. The models using Poisson distribution for the number of components and hyper-Poisson distribution for connections provide good fits in the case of the Vai script.
Toric Intraocular Lens Malposition Corrected by Lens Repositioning to Manifest Refractive Cylinder Axis in Patient with Irregular Astigmatism Due to Corneal Scar  [PDF]
Riley Sanders, Johnny Gayton
Open Journal of Ophthalmology (OJOph) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojoph.2015.52010
Abstract: A case is presented of a patient with an unexpected poor visual result and subsequent correction following cataract removal surgery via phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation using a toric intraocular lens implant (IOL). The initial operation resulted in an uncorrected vision of 20/100 (0.70 logMAR). Retrospective analysis of the patient’s corneal topography revealed irregular astigmatism secondary to remote trauma to the cornea. The cylinder axis on manifest refraction (MR) was significantly different from measured keratometry, so a second procedure was performed to align the cylinder axis of the IOL with the steep axis on MR. This repositioning procedure improved visual outcome to a final uncorrected vision of 20/25 (0.10 logMAR) and best corrected acuity of 20/20 (0.0 logMAR).
The Myth of the High-Efficiency External-Combustion Stirling Engine  [PDF]
Paul H. Riley
Engineering (ENG) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/eng.2015.712068
Abstract: The reported discrepancy between theory and experiment for external combustion Stirling engines is explained by the addition of thermal resistance of the combustion gasses to the standard Carnot model. In these cases, the Stirling engine ideal efficiency is not as is normally reported equal to the Carnot cycle efficiency but is significantly lower. A new equation for ideal Stirling engine efficiency when the heat is obtained through external combustion without pre-heating the air, is presented and results for various fuels tabulated. The results show that petrol and diesel, internal combustion engines (Otto cycle) have a higher ideal efficiency than the Stirling engine. When comparing thermoacoustic engines heated by wood, efficiency should not be quoted as a percentage of the Carnot efficiency, but against a figure 48% lower than Carnot. The effect is not seen with electrically heated rigs, solar or nuclear fission heated engines.
Cementitious Spray Dryer Ash-Tire Fiber Material for Maximizing Waste Diversion
Charles E. Riley,Rebecca A. Atadero,John W. van de Lindt,Paul R. Heyliger
Advances in Civil Engineering , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/354305
Abstract: Spray dryer absorber (SDA) material, also known as spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of coal combustion and flue gas scrubbing processes that has self-cementing properties similar to those of class C fly ash. SDA material does not usually meet the existing standards for use as a pozzolan in Portland cement concrete due to its characteristically high sulfur content, and thus unlike fly ash, it is rarely put to beneficial use. This paper presents the results of a study with the objective of developing beneficial uses for SDA material in building materials when combined with tire fiber reinforcement originating from a recycling process. Specifically, spray dryer ash was investigated for use as the primary or even the sole binding component in a mortar or concrete. This study differs from previous research in that it focuses on very high contents of spray dryer ash (80 to 100 percent) in a hardened product. The overarching objective is to divert products that are normally sent to landfills and provide benefit to society in beneficial applications. 1. Introduction Portland cement concretes and mortars are used extensively in construction of buildings, bridges, and other infrastructure ranging from low-strength sidewalks to high-performance airport runways. Despite recent advances in manufacture, Portland cement remains an energy-intensive product that requires mining of raw materials as well as significant energy input and processing. Incorporation of coal fly ash into concrete mixtures is now widely accepted given its capacity to produce an equivalent or even improved hardened concrete product with less Portland cement and, therefore, reduced raw materials extraction and carbon emissions [1]. However, a substantial portion of fly ash produced each year goes unused, and a significant portion of the country’s ash material is deemed useless because it is involved in the flue gas desulfurization process within the spray dryer absorbers utilized at many of the United States coal power plants [2]. It is the material from this subset of plants, alternatively called spray dryer absorber material, SDA material, or spray dryer ash, that is the subject of this research. Spray dryer ash is produced in far smaller quantities than fly ash in the US. The American Coal Ash Association, ACCA, estimates 1.4?million?tons for all dry flue gas desulfurization products, of which spray dryer ash makes up a large portion [3]. While nearly 42 percent of all fly ash produced in the United States (approximately 72?million?tons annually [3]) is used beneficially, only about 25 percent
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Reported Practices Among Obstetrician-Gynecologists in the USA Regarding Antibiotic Prescribing for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections
Shadi Chamany,Jay Schulkin,Charles E. Rose Jr.,Laura E. Riley,Richard E. Besser
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2005, DOI: 10.1155/2005/405868
Abstract: Background: Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antibiotic prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections (URIs) have not been well described among obstetrician-gynecologists (OB/GYNs). This information is useful for determining whether an OB/GYN-specific program promoting appropriate antibiotic use would significantly contribute to the efforts to decrease inappropriate antibiotic use among primary care providers.
A large, consistent plasma proteomics data set from prospectively collected breast cancer patient and healthy volunteer samples
Catherine P Riley, Xiang Zhang, Harikrishna Nakshatri, Bryan Schneider, Fred E Regnier, Jiri Adamec, Charles Buck
Journal of Translational Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1479-5876-9-80
Abstract: We carried out a clinical trial-like protocol to standardize collection of plasma from 204 healthy and 216 breast cancer patient volunteers. The breast cancer patients provided follow up samples at 3 month intervals. We generated proteomics profiles from these samples with a stable and reproducible platform for differential proteomics that employs a highly consistent nanofabricated ChipCube? chromatography system for peptide detection and quantification with fast, single dimension mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Protein identification is achieved with subsequent LC-MS/MS analysis employing the same ChipCube? chromatography system.With this consistent platform, over 800 LC-MS plasma proteomic profiles from prospectively collected samples of 420 individuals were obtained. Using a web-based data analysis pipeline for LC-MS profiling data, analyses of all peptide peaks from these plasma LC-MS profiles reveals an average coefficient of variability of less than 15%. Protein identification of peptide peaks of interest has been achieved with subsequent LC-MS/MS analyses and by referring to a spectral library created from about 150 discrete LC-MS/MS runs. Verification of peptide quantity and identity is demonstrated with several Multiple Reaction Monitoring analyses. These plasma proteomic profiles are publicly available through ProteomeCommons.From a large prospective cohort of healthy and breast cancer patient volunteers and using a nano-fabricated chromatography system, a consistent LC-MS proteomics dataset has been generated that includes more than 800 discrete human plasma profiles. This large proteomics dataset provides an important resource in support of breast cancer biomarker discovery and validation efforts.Proteomic analyses of readily accessible bodily fluids present a powerful opportunity to monitor experimental and control (e.g., healthy and disease) phenotypes with an extremely data-rich readout [1-3]. The proteomic approach enables detection and quantification of
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