oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 33 )

2018 ( 213 )

2017 ( 226 )

2016 ( 337 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 205613 matches for " Charlease P. Kelly-Jackson "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /205613
Display every page Item
Meeting Their Fullest Potential: The Beliefs and Teaching of a Culturally Relevant Science Teacher  [PDF]
Charlease P. Kelly-Jackson, Tambra O. Jackson
Creative Education (CE) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2011.24059
Abstract: As elementary and middle school children of color continue to score poorly on science standardized tests, culturally relevant teaching has been shown to be an effective approach to addressing the social and academic needs of students from diverse backgrounds. In this article, we illustrate how the theory of culturally relevant pedagogy is embraced in the teaching beliefs of a sixth grade science teacher in a rural, low socioeconomic, predominantly African American school. The findings from a qualitative case study reveal beliefs and teaching practices consistent with three major tenets of culturally relevant pedagogy: conceptions of self and students; social relations; and perceptions of knowledge (Ladson-Billings, 2009). This study builds upon the culturally relevant pedagogy knowledge base by illustrating the tenets of this theory in the beliefs and teaching practices of a sixth grade science teacher.
The Franco-British Exhibition of 1908: Legacies and Memories One Hundred Years On
Debra Kelly,Tom Jackson
Synergies Royaume-Uni et Irlande , 2009,
Abstract: This article seeks to ‘locate’ the memory and traces of the FrancoBritish Exhibition firstly in the geographical space of contemporary London and then within the broader ‘space’ of its contribution to social and cultural history, with a specific focus on the use of the postcard. Taking as a point of departure the context and development of ‘memory studies’ in the UK and a brief history of the postcard in that period, it goes on to ask what the ‘memory-value’ of the Exhibition is one hundred years on through the analysis of a series of postcard messages sent from the “White City”. The research for this article is based partly on a BBC 4 radio programme commissioned for the centenary of the Franco-British Exhibition: “Postcards from the White City”.L’article cherche à ‘situer’ la mémoire et les traces de l’Exposition FrancoBritannique en premier lieu dans l’espace géographique contemporain de Londres, et puis dans ‘l’espace’ plus large d’une contribution à l’histoire sociale and culturelle, visant tout particulièrement l’usage de la carte postale. Le contexte et le développement des ‘memory studies’ en Grande Bretagne et une histoire brève de la carte postale à l’époque fournissent un point de départ. L’article procède à interroger la ‘memory-value’ (‘valeur-mémoire’) de l’Exposition au moment de son centenaire à travers une analyse des messages écrits au dos des cartes postales envoyées de la “White City”.Les recherches se basent en partie sur une émission commandée au moment du centenaire de L’Exposition pour la BBC Radio 4: “Cartes postales de la White City”.
Families and food: beyond the "cultural turn"?
P. Jackson
Social Geography (SG) & Discussions (SGD) , 2011, DOI: 10.5194/sg-6-63-2011
Abstract: This paper provides some personal reflections on the ''cultural turn'' in human geography including a tentative chronology of events. It outlines some of the characteristics of the ''cultural turn'' and some of the criticisms that have been levelled against it. In the body of the paper, I attempt to assess the value of the ''cultural turn'', conceptually and methodologically, as applied to two recent research projects on the geography of food and families. The paper concludes that the ''cultural turn'' greatly enriched the study of human geography through its analysis of discourse, representation and practice. But other approaches are required to explain broader changes in political-economy and the materiality of nature. While the ''cultural turn'' contributed to our understanding of materiality and our place in a more-than-human world, geographers are now also embracing other approaches such as those informed by actor-network theory and geographies of emotion, embodiment and affect. The paper concludes with an agenda for future research on the political and moral economies of food, focusing on contemporary consumer anxieties at a range of geographical scales.
Families and food: beyond the "cultural turn"?
P. Jackson
Social Geography Discussions , 2010, DOI: 10.5194/sgd-6-51-2010
Abstract: This paper provides some personal reflections on the "cultural turn" in human geography including a tentative chronology of events. It outlines some of the characteristics of the "cultural turn" and some of the criticisms that have been levelled against it. In the body of the paper, I attempt to assess the value of the "cultural turn", conceptually and methodologically, as applied to two recent research projects on the geography of food and families. The paper concludes that the "cultural turn" greatly enriched the study of human geography through its analysis of discourse, representation and practice. But other approaches are required to explain broader changes in political-economy and the materiality of nature. While the "cultural turn" contributed to our understanding of materiality and our place in a more-than-human world, geographers are now also embracing other approaches such as those informed by actor-network theory and geographies of emotion, embodiment and affect. The paper concludes with an agenda for future research on the political and moral economies of food, focusing on contemporary consumer anxieties at a range of geographical scales.
Immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF)
Melanie Ehrlich, Kelly Jackson, Corry Weemaes
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-2
Abstract: Immunodeficiency, Centromeric instability, and Facial anomalies syndrome was given the acronym ICF in 1988 [1]. ICF is an autosomal recessive disease. Note that the instability is not in the centromere itself, but rather in the region adjacent to the centromere (qh), predominantly in chromosomes 1 and 16.ICF (OMIM #24242860) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that involves agammaglobulinemia or hypoglobulinemia with B cells as well as DNA rearrangements targeted to the centromere-adjacent heterochromatic region (qh) of chromosomes 1 and/or 16 (and sometimes 9) in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The frequency of these rearrangements is high enough to be detected upon routine cytogenetic examination of metaphase chromosomes. These rearrangement-prone heterochromatic regions exhibit DNA hypomethylation in all examined ICF cell populations. The three invariant features of ICF are the immunodeficiency despite the presence of B cells; characteristic rearrangements of chromosome 1 and/or 16 with breakpoints at 1qh and 16qh in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes; and hypomethylation of classical satellite 2 and 3 DNA, the main DNA components of 1qh, 16qh, and 9qh [2], in leukocytes, other tissues, and cell cultures from ICF patients.ICF is an autosomal recessive disease, with approximately 50 patients reported worldwide since it was first described in the late 1970's [3,4]. The patients come mostly from Europe. However, ICF patients are of diverse ethnicity, including European, Turkish, Japanese, and African American. Some excess of consanguinity has been noted [5-7], although most cases are not familial. Recently, there has been a sharp increase in the number of diagnosed, non-familial cases in Europe and Japan, which suggests that this disease is underdiagnosed, especially in the United States, where only a few cases have been reported [8,9].The locus for ICF was localized to 20q11-q13 by homozygosity mapping [10]. This led to the discovery that the DNMT3B gene is often the
Evaluation of the impacts of aquaculture and freshwater habitat on the status of Atlantic salmon stocks in Ireland  [PDF]
David Jackson, Tom McDermott, Frank Kane, Pauline O’Donohoe, Suzanne Kelly
Agricultural Sciences (AS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/as.2013.46A010
Abstract: Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) returns to rivers in Ireland have fallen in the last decade resulting in the dramatic closure or curtailment of traditional fisheries. Concerns that stocks were slow to recover prompted further investigation of all factors believed to impact on salmon. In examining geographic and temporal trends in Atlantic salmon stock abundance at a River Basin District level, the effect of salmon aquaculture sites and freshwater habitat quality as potential drivers of stock abundance are evaluated. This study found no correlation between the presence of aquaculture and the performance of adjacent wild salmon stocks. Freshwater habitat quality was found to have a highly significant correlation with stock status, suggesting that it may be a key driver, implicated in the survival of individual stocks.
Breaking the Adhesive Bond between Dialyll Phthlate, Barco Bond 185 and PBX 9501  [PDF]
Matt Jackson, Benton Allen, Trent Kelly, Courtney Waddell, Emily M. Hunt, Stephanie Steelman, Neil Koone
Journal of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering (MSCE) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/msce.2015.37026
Abstract:

Use of epoxy as an adhesive is a common practice. The most common applications are permanent sealants. Epoxies have a wide range of operating temperatures, and are very resistance to adhesive failure. When a need to remove this adhesive arises, it is not always easily accomplished especially if the part has excessive adhesive. To maintain fidelity of the parts attached by epoxy, a project evaluating several methods of epoxy removal was conducted. Methods evaluated included low wavelength, near-ultraviolet radiation, solvent dissolution, and thermal cycling. The UV method failed to demonstrate a repeatable dissociation. The solvent study did result in dissociation of bonds, but introduced chemicals that could make subsequent chemical analysis of parts suspect. Thermal cycling showed a high repeatability for dissociation of bonds and may prove to be relatively inexpensive to implement.

Vitamin A metabolism to retinoic acid and its possible implications in HIV/AIDS
P Kelly
Medical Journal of Zambia , 2009,
Abstract: No
Spinster Homolog 2 (Spns2) Deficiency Causes Early Onset Progressive Hearing Loss
Jing Chen,Neil Ingham,John Kelly,Shalini Jadeja,David Goulding,Johanna Pass,Vinit B. Mahajan,Stephen H. Tsang,Anastasia Nijnik,Ian J. Jackson,Jacqueline K. White,Andrew Forge,Daniel Jagger,Karen P. Steel
PLOS Genetics , 2014, DOI: doi/10.1371/journal.pgen.1004688
Abstract: Spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) acts as a Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter in zebrafish and mice, regulating heart development and lymphocyte trafficking respectively. S1P is a biologically active lysophospholipid with multiple roles in signalling. The mechanism of action of Spns2 is still elusive in mammals. Here, we report that Spns2-deficient mice rapidly lost auditory sensitivity and endocochlear potential (EP) from 2 to 3 weeks old. We found progressive degeneration of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti, but the earliest defect was a decline in the EP, suggesting that dysfunction of the lateral wall was the primary lesion. In the lateral wall of adult mutants, we observed structural changes of marginal cell boundaries and of strial capillaries, and reduced expression of several key proteins involved in the generation of the EP (Kcnj10, Kcnq1, Gjb2 and Gjb6), but these changes were likely to be secondary. Permeability of the boundaries of the stria vascularis and of the strial capillaries appeared normal. We also found focal retinal degeneration and anomalies of retinal capillaries together with anterior eye defects in Spns2 mutant mice. Targeted inactivation of Spns2 in red blood cells, platelets, or lymphatic or vascular endothelial cells did not affect hearing, but targeted ablation of Spns2 in the cochlea using a Sox10-Cre allele produced a similar auditory phenotype to the original mutation, suggesting that local Spns2 expression is critical for hearing in mammals. These findings indicate that Spns2 is required for normal maintenance of the EP and hence for normal auditory function, and support a role for S1P signalling in hearing.
Predictors of Effectiveness in a Multifamily Therapy Program for Adolescents with Externalizing Behaviors  [PDF]
Josh Feldblyum, Dahra Jackson Williams, John P. Walker, Susan Jackson-Walker
Journal of Service Science and Management (JSSM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2014.73022
Abstract:

Severe externalizing behavior among adolescents is a significant societal problem, in terms of both emotional and financial costs. Much research has focused on factors that increase or decrease the risk of adolescents developing such behavior. In addition, various treatment methods have been developed to address this problem, with promising results under some circumstances. The present study examined archival data from one multifamily therapy program to examine potential predictors of the effectiveness of treatment. These predictors were communication style and relationship quality between parents and adolescents, as well as parents’ readiness for change. Parent-adolescent relationship quality and communication style were both found to significantly predict treatment outcomes in some, but not all, problem areas examined. Parent readiness did not predict treatment outcomes. Results have implications for improving the clinical outcomes of family treatment programs.

Page 1 /205613
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.