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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 61 matches for " Chapa "
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Programa Emprendedor Obligatorio: Alternativa de Educación Integral
Chapa,E.A;
Formación universitaria , 2008, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-50062008000600006
Abstract: this article discusses the application of an enterprising program for engineering careers in higher education schools. the accreditation system in mexico, which applies to these schools, considers the inclusion of some courses in social sciences, but the number of courses needed for the integral formation of the future engineers is limited. therefore, an enterprising program which includes courses such as finances, marketing, human relations and social psychology is proposed and analyzed. the program has shown to be effective since it exposes students to practical cases that they will find during their professional life.
Maternal morbidity at first repeat cesarean: a sub-analysis of Interceed barrier placed at primary cesarean section
Chapa HO, Venegas G
Open Access Surgery , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAS.S41447
Abstract: ternal morbidity at first repeat cesarean: a sub-analysis of Interceed barrier placed at primary cesarean section Original Research (558) Total Article Views Authors: Chapa HO, Venegas G Published Date February 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 7 - 12 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAS.S41447 Received: 11 December 2012 Accepted: 04 January 2013 Published: 11 February 2013 Hector O Chapa, Gonzalo Venegas Women's Specialty Center Dallas, Chapa Medical Consulting, Dallas, TX, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to compare maternal morbidity at repeat cesarean section (CS) between use of a Gynecare Interceed Absorbable Adhesion Barrier (Gynecare, Somerville, NJ, USA) and non-use at primary cesarean delivery. Design: This was a retrospective study of patients in whom an absorbable adhesion barrier was/was not used at their primary CS. Methods: Mean and excessive blood loss, the need for adhesiolysis, and postoperative fever were compared between those in whom a barrier was used at first CS and those in whom a barrier was not used. Visceral injury at repeat cesarean was also compared between the two groups. Results: No statistically significant difference in mean blood loss was noted between the two groups. However, significantly more patients in whom a barrier was not used had excessive intraoperative blood loss (barrier group, 1/53 [1.9%]; no-barrier group, 6/59 [10.1%]; P = 0.04). All seven cases of excessive blood loss had adhesiolysis. Significantly more patients in the no-barrier group underwent adhesiolysis (no-barrier group, 35/59 [59.3%]; barrier group, 7/53 [13.2%]; P = 0.03). No statistical difference in postoperative metritis was noted (1/59 [1.8%] in the barrier group and 1/59 [1.7%] in the no-barrier group; P = 0.99). Only one deserosalization of the bladder dome occurred in a patient in the no-barrier group. Conclusion: Those in whom a barrier was not used at primary CS were more likely to have adhesiolysis and excessive blood loss (>1250 mL) at repeat CS. No significant difference in postoperative metritis/fever was noted between groups. Adhesion barrier at primary CS may reduce some aspects of maternal morbidity at repeat CS.
A novel medical protocol to treat uterotubal spasm during Essure hysteroscopic sterilization: a pilot study
Chapa HO, Venegas G
Open Access Journal of Contraception (OAJC) , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAJC.S30583
Abstract: novel medical protocol to treat uterotubal spasm during Essure hysteroscopic sterilization: a pilot study Original Research (2051) Total Article Views Authors: Chapa HO, Venegas G Published Date June 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 27 - 30 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAJC.S30583 Received: 05 February 2012 Accepted: 10 April 2012 Published: 21 June 2012 Hector O Chapa,1 Gonzalo Venegas2 1Women's Specialty Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Clinical Faculty, Department ObGyn Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Objective: To evaluate sublingual hyoscyamine (0.125 mg) as a uterotubal spasm reliever to increase successful bilateral, first-attempt Essure microinsert placement. Study design: Prospective cohort study as pilot clinical investigation of study medicine. Setting: An inner-city Dallas, TX obstetrics and gynecology office practice. Materials and methods: The study period was January 1, 2008 to July 1, 2010. Patients requesting sterilization were offered Essure under local anesthesia (office setting). Those declining were referred for operative laparoscopy. Patients accepting office sterilization were offered study participation. Study patients noted to have intraoperative uni/bilateral uterotubal spasms preventing cannulation were given one sublingual hyoscyamine (0.125 mg) tablet. Primary endpoint: spasm alleviation and successful tubal cannulation (bilaterally). Secondary endpoint: percentage of bilateral tubal occlusions documented by follow up hysterosalpingogram (12 weeks), and adverse events possibly related to medication. Results: Within the study period, 316 patients underwent office sterilization (local anesthesia); 21 had unilateral tubal spasm preventing cannulation (6%). Spasm was relieved in 17/21 (80%) after hyoscyamine, allowing for microinsert placement. The mean time from attempted cannulation to medication was 9 minutes (8.3–10.5 minutes), and the mean time for spasm resolution was 53 seconds (49–72 seconds). At follow-up confirmation testing, all 17 who were hyoscynamine responders were found to have bilateral tubal occlusion as well as proper microinsert location. The 4/21 hyoscyamine nonresponders underwent a second unilateral attempt 48–72 hours later. Fifty percent (n = 2) had successful placement, leaving two for alternative care. Rapid pulse was reported by 1/21 (4.7%) 5 minutes postmedication. Conclusion: Essure sterilization has a high bilateral, first-attempt success rate. Hyoscyamine may aid in spasm relief and increase single procedure, bilateral placement success rate further.
Preprocedure patient preferences and attitudes toward permanent contraceptive options
Chapa HO, Venegas G
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S30247
Abstract: eprocedure patient preferences and attitudes toward permanent contraceptive options Original Research (1808) Total Article Views Authors: Chapa HO, Venegas G Published Date April 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 331 - 336 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S30247 Received: 26 January 2012 Accepted: 09 February 2012 Published: 17 April 2012 Hector O Chapa, Gonzalo Venegas Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women’s Specialty Center Dallas, Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Objective: To determine patient preference for laparoscopic tubal occlusion or hysteroscopic tubal occlusion, two common sterilization interventions, and the acceptability of a postprocedure confirmation test for a hysteroscopic approach. Participants and methods: A total of 100 patients were offered two procedures. A description of each procedure was developed and read to each patient by a research nurse on site. Patients were then asked to respond to a questionnaire concerning options. Final informed consent, procedure review, and procedural date determination were provided by a physician upon completion of the questionnaire. Patients were not allowed to change their questionnaire responses after completion. No interviewer or physician input was allowed during the questionnaire. The study was completed in English or Spanish, as per patient request, by a bilingual/fluent speaker. Physicians completing informed consent were unaware of the questionnaire responses. Patients were not financially incentivized. Results: Of 100 participants, 93 (93%) preferred hysteroscopic sterilization to laparoscopy. The reasons were as follows: fear of general anesthesia (24/93 [26%]), fear of incision (25/93 [27%]), cost (32/93 [34%]), and time (12/93 [13%]) to return to routine activity. All 93 viewed “office-based location” as the main advantage over laparoscopy; 88/93 (94.6%) considered a confirmation test to be a benefit of the procedure. After informed consent was obtained, one additional patient switched from a laparoscopic decision to hysteroscopy (total = 94/100); 89/94 (95%) hysteroscopic decisions underwent hysteroscopic sterilization; 4/6 (67%) laparoscopic decisions proceeded to that surgery. The remainder (N = 7) cancelled due to lack of financial resources. Conclusion: A nonincisional, office-based approach to sterilization has high patient acceptability. Patients viewed a confirmatory test for tubal occlusion as a benefit after sterilization.
Confirmation test for hysteroscopic sterilization: a descriptive study of patient tolerability and impressions
Chapa HO,Venegas G
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2013,
Abstract: Hector O Chapa, Gonzalo VenegasDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Methodist Medical and Women’s Specialty Center, Dallas, TX, USABackground: This retrospective descriptive study describes patient follow-up and tolerability of the post-hysteroscopic sterilization confirmation test.Methods: Recruitment for the original sterilization procedure was from January 2008 to March 2009; subsequent confirmation test (hysterosalpingogram) capture was from March 2008 to July 2009. Patients were given a 10 cm visual analog pain scale during the hysteroscopic sterilization procedure, and took the scale with them as a take-home sheet. Following hysterosalpingography (HSG), patients received a follow-up phone call within 24 hours, and were asked to rate their pain during the hysterosalpingogram as well as during the first 2 hours following the test.Results: Eighty-nine hysteroscopic sterilizations were performed under local paracervical block and oral nonsteroidal medication. The median immediate post-sterilization visual analog pain score was 1.9 (range 1.7–2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–1.5). Of the 89 sterilization procedures, 79% (n = 70) patients underwent a confirmation test using HSG. Ten percent (n = 7) of the hysterosalpinograms were performed at least 3 months after sterilization (mean 17 [range 14–20] weeks). Median intratest visual analog pain score overall (n = 70) was 1.8 (range 1.6–1.9, 95% CI 1.5–1.9). Following the test, the median visual analog pain score was 1.7 (range 1.6–1.9, 95% CI 1.4–0.18). Of the 70 patients who participated in visual analog pain score capture, 64 had a paper copy of the scale had six had it via email. Of the 19 who did not complete hysterosalpinography, five were lost to follow-up. Reasons given by the remaining 14 for noncompliance with hysterosalpinography were: a busy schedule/childcare issues (62%), fear of the test (13%), trust in the sterilization procedure alone (13%), and forgetting the appointment (12%). Of the 70 HSGs performed, 69 revealed satisfactory micro insert positions with bilateral occlusion; one was unilaterally patent at 13 weeks post-sterilization, with satisfactory micro insert position. Repeat testing 10 weeks later documented bilateral occlusion.Conclusion: Confirmation testing for hysteroscopic sterilization is well tolerated, with favorable patient impressions after completion.Keywords: emale permanent birth control, female sterilization, Essure confirmation test, contraception
Preprocedure patient preferences and attitudes toward permanent contraceptive options
Chapa HO,Venegas G
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012,
Abstract: Hector O Chapa, Gonzalo VenegasDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women’s Specialty Center Dallas, Methodist Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAObjective: To determine patient preference for laparoscopic tubal occlusion or hysteroscopic tubal occlusion, two common sterilization interventions, and the acceptability of a postprocedure confirmation test for a hysteroscopic approach.Participants and methods: A total of 100 patients were offered two procedures. A description of each procedure was developed and read to each patient by a research nurse on site. Patients were then asked to respond to a questionnaire concerning options. Final informed consent, procedure review, and procedural date determination were provided by a physician upon completion of the questionnaire. Patients were not allowed to change their questionnaire responses after completion. No interviewer or physician input was allowed during the questionnaire. The study was completed in English or Spanish, as per patient request, by a bilingual/fluent speaker. Physicians completing informed consent were unaware of the questionnaire responses. Patients were not financially incentivized.Results: Of 100 participants, 93 (93%) preferred hysteroscopic sterilization to laparoscopy. The reasons were as follows: fear of general anesthesia (24/93 [26%]), fear of incision (25/93 [27%]), cost (32/93 [34%]), and time (12/93 [13%]) to return to routine activity. All 93 viewed “office-based location” as the main advantage over laparoscopy; 88/93 (94.6%) considered a confirmation test to be a benefit of the procedure. After informed consent was obtained, one additional patient switched from a laparoscopic decision to hysteroscopy (total = 94/100); 89/94 (95%) hysteroscopic decisions underwent hysteroscopic sterilization; 4/6 (67%) laparoscopic decisions proceeded to that surgery. The remainder (N = 7) cancelled due to lack of financial resources.Conclusion: A nonincisional, office-based approach to sterilization has high patient acceptability. Patients viewed a confirmatory test for tubal occlusion as a benefit after sterilization.Keywords: sterilization, hysteroscopy, confirmation testing, laparoscopy, patient preference
The perception of children in the lberian culture
Chapa Brunet, Teresa
Trabajos de Prehistoria , 2003,
Abstract: This paper tries to analyze childhood during the Iron Age "lberian Culture", a topic which has received almost no attention up to now. Every society must find an efficient system in order to transmit to their descendants the body of principles and rules that constitute its foundations, as this is essential to its perpetuation. The way children are treated is a window through which we can discover some keys of the social and ideological organization of any human group. Different archaeological contexts of lberian infancy are here analyzed, and some hypothesis are offered about how lberians organized the different stages of growth, from birth until youth. Este trabajo pretende atraer la atención sobre un tema aún poco tratado en los estudios sobre la cultura ibérica, como es el análisis de la infancia. Toda sociedad debe arbitrar un sistema eficaz para transmitir a sus descendientes los principios en los que se fundamenta, puesto que ello depende su propia perpetuación. El trato otorgado a los ni os es por tanto una ventana para descubrir las claves de la organización social e ideológica de cualquier grupo humano. Se analizan los distintos contextos arqueológicos en los que se aprecia presencia infantil, y se aportan hipótesis acerca de la valoración y de las distintas fases de desarrollo que debieron reconocerse en el mundo ibérico desde el nacimiento de un bebé hasta su entrada en la fase juvenil.
La destrucción de la escultura funeraria ibérica
Chapa Brunet, Teresa
Trabajos de Prehistoria , 1993,
Abstract: It is generally assumed that ancient Iberian funerary sculpture was actively destroyed as a consequence of social change. I propose in this paper that continuity must be taken into account, and that many Iberian monuments could have undergone a process of abandonment and ruin, and not so much a violent destruction. En este trabajo se revisa la consideración generalizada de que toda la escultura ibérica antigua fue destruida activamente como fruto de un cambio social. Se resaltan ciertos aspectos de continuidad y se propone que muchos monumentos pudieron sufrir más un proceso de abandono y ruina que un abatimiento violento.
Iconografía y economía : un ejemplo aplicado a los origenes de la escultura ibérica en el área del Bajo Segura (Alicante)
Teresa Chapa Brunet
Munibe Antropologia-Arkeologia , 2005,
Abstract: Este trabajo estudia ciertas esculturas ibéricas de piedra representando toros, en el entorno de la desembocadura del río Segura (Alicante). Se considera que estas figuras son las más antiguas manifestaciones de la escultura ibérica de la zona, y se propone su relación con patrones ideológicos de raigambre oriental, relacionados con la presencia fenicia en la zona y las transformnaciones que dan lugar a la cultura ibérica. Se analiza la correspondencia entre los animales elegidos como símbolo religioso y político, y las prácticas economicas de las poblaciones de la zona. Se concluye que los toros se vinculan al dominio y explotación agrícola del territorio más que a una ganadería centrada en el ganado vacuno
Maternal morbidity at first repeat cesarean: a sub-analysis of Interceed™ barrier placed at primary cesarean section
Chapa HO,Venegas G
Open Access Surgery , 2013,
Abstract: Hector O Chapa, Gonzalo Venegas Women's Specialty Center Dallas, Chapa Medical Consulting, Dallas, TX, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to compare maternal morbidity at repeat cesarean section (CS) between use of a Gynecare Interceed Absorbable Adhesion Barrier (Gynecare, Somerville, NJ, USA) and non-use at primary cesarean delivery. Design: This was a retrospective study of patients in whom an absorbable adhesion barrier was/was not used at their primary CS. Methods: Mean and excessive blood loss, the need for adhesiolysis, and postoperative fever were compared between those in whom a barrier was used at first CS and those in whom a barrier was not used. Visceral injury at repeat cesarean was also compared between the two groups. Results: No statistically significant difference in mean blood loss was noted between the two groups. However, significantly more patients in whom a barrier was not used had excessive intraoperative blood loss (barrier group, 1/53 [1.9%]; no-barrier group, 6/59 [10.1%]; P = 0.04). All seven cases of excessive blood loss had adhesiolysis. Significantly more patients in the no-barrier group underwent adhesiolysis (no-barrier group, 35/59 [59.3%]; barrier group, 7/53 [13.2%]; P = 0.03). No statistical difference in postoperative metritis was noted (1/59 [1.8%] in the barrier group and 1/59 [1.7%] in the no-barrier group; P = 0.99). Only one deserosalization of the bladder dome occurred in a patient in the no-barrier group. Conclusion: Those in whom a barrier was not used at primary CS were more likely to have adhesiolysis and excessive blood loss (>1250 mL) at repeat CS. No significant difference in postoperative metritis/fever was noted between groups. Adhesion barrier at primary CS may reduce some aspects of maternal morbidity at repeat CS. Keywords: excessive blood loss, adhesiolysis, postoperative metritis, postoperative fever, visceral injury
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