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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5115 matches for " Chandrama Mukherjee equal contributor "
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Inter-Cellular Variation in DNA Content of Entamoeba histolytica Originates from Temporal and Spatial Uncoupling of Cytokinesis from the Nuclear Cycle
Chandrama Mukherjee equal contributor,Shubhra Majumder equal contributor,Anuradha Lohia
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000409
Abstract: Accumulation of multiple copies of the genome in a single nucleus and several nuclei in a single cell has previously been noted in Entamoeba histolytica, contributing to the genetic heterogeneity of this unicellular eukaryote. In this study, we demonstrate that this genetic heterogeneity is an inherent feature of the cell cycle of this organism. Chromosome segregation occurs on a variety of novel microtubular assemblies including multi-polar spindles. Cytokinesis in E. histolytica is completed by the mechanical severing of a thin cytoplasmic bridge, either independently or with the help of neighboring cells. Importantly, cytokinesis is uncoupled from the nuclear division cycle, both temporally and spatially, leading to the formation of unequal daughter cells. Sorting of euploid and polyploid cells showed that each of these sub-populations acquired heterogeneous DNA content upon further growth. Our study conclusively demonstrates that genetic heterogeneity originates from the unique mode of cell division events in this protist.
SUMO Localizes to the Central Element of Synaptonemal Complex and Is Required for the Full Synapsis of Meiotic Chromosomes in Budding Yeast
Karen Voelkel-Meiman equal contributor,Louis F. Taylor equal contributor,Pritam Mukherjee,Neil Humphryes,Hideo Tsubouchi,Amy J. MacQueen
PLOS Genetics , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1003837
Abstract: The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a widely conserved structure that mediates the intimate alignment of homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase and is required for proper homolog segregation at meiosis I. However, fundamental details of SC architecture and assembly remain poorly understood. The coiled-coil protein, Zip1, is the only component whose arrangement within the mature SC of budding yeast has been extensively characterized. It has been proposed that the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier, SUMO, plays a role in SC assembly by linking chromosome axes with Zip1's C termini. The role of SUMO in SC structure has not been directly tested, however, because cells lacking SUMO are inviable. Here, we provide direct evidence for SUMO's function in SC assembly. A meiotic smt3 reduction-of-function strain displays reduced sporulation, abnormal levels of crossover recombination, and diminished SC assembly. SC structures are nearly absent when induced at later meiotic time points in the smt3 reduction-of-function background. Using Structured Illumination Microscopy we furthermore determine the position of SUMO within budding yeast SC structure. In contrast to previous models that positioned SUMO near Zip1's C termini, we demonstrate that SUMO lies at the midline of SC central region proximal to Zip1's N termini, within a subdomain called the “central element”. The recently identified SUMOylated SC component, Ecm11, also localizes to the SC central element. Finally, we show that SUMO, Ecm11, and even unSUMOylatable Ecm11 exhibit Zip1-like ongoing incorporation into previously established SCs during meiotic prophase and that the relative abundance of SUMO and Ecm11 correlates with Zip1's abundance within SCs of varying Zip1 content. We discuss a model in which central element proteins are core building blocks that stabilize the architecture of SC near Zip1's N termini, and where SUMOylation may occur subsequent to the incorporation of components like Ecm11 into an SC precursor structure.
Leishmania donovani Infection Enhances Lateral Mobility of Macrophage Membrane Protein Which Is Reversed by Liposomal Cholesterol
Moumita Ghosh equal contributor,Koushik Roy equal contributor,Dipanwita Das Mukherjee,Gopal Chakrabarti,Kingshuk Roy Choudhury,Syamal Roy
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003367
Abstract: Background The protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani (LD) reduces cellular cholesterol of the host possibly for its own benefit. Cholesterol is mostly present in the specialized compartment of the plasma membrane. The relation between mobility of membrane proteins and cholesterol depletion from membrane continues to be an important issue. The notion that leishmania infection alters the mobility of membrane proteins stems from our previous study where we showed that the distance between subunits of IFNγ receptor (R1 and R2) on the cell surface of LD infected cell is increased, but is restored to normal by liposomal cholesterol treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the lateral mobility of a membrane protein in normal, LD infected and liposome treated LD infected cells using GFP-tagged PLCδ1 as a probe. The mobility of PLCδ1 was computationally analyzed from the time lapse experiment using boundary distance plot and radial profile movement. Our results showed that the lateral mobility of the membrane protein, which is increased in infection, is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment. The results of FRAP experiment lent further credence to the above notion. The membrane proteins are intimately linked with cellular actin and alteration of cellular actin may influence lateral mobility. We found that F-actin is decreased in infection but is restored to normal upon liposomal cholesterol treatment as evident from phalloidin staining and also from biochemical analysis by immunoblotting. Conclusions/Significances To our knowledge this is the first direct demonstration that LD parasites during their intracellular life cycle increases lateral mobility of membrane proteins and decreases F-actin level in infected macrophages. Such defects may contribute to ineffective intracellular signaling and other cellular functions.
Entamoeba Shows Reversible Variation in Ploidy under Different Growth Conditions and between Life Cycle Phases
Chandrama Mukherjee,C. Graham Clark,Anuradha Lohia
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2008, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0000281
Abstract: Under axenic growth conditions, trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica contain heterogenous amounts of DNA due to the presence of both multiple nuclei and different amounts of DNA in individual nuclei. In order to establish if the DNA content and the observed heterogeneity is maintained during different growth conditions, we have compared E. histolytica cells growing in xenic and axenic cultures. Our results show that the nuclear DNA content of E. histolytica trophozoites growing in axenic cultures is at least 10 fold higher than in xenic cultures. Re-association of axenic cultures with their bacterial flora led to a reduction of DNA content to the original xenic values. Thus switching between xenic and axenic growth conditions was accompanied by significant changes in the nuclear DNA content of this parasite. Changes in DNA content during encystation-excystation were studied in the related reptilian parasite E. invadens. During excystation of E. invadens cysts, it was observed that the nuclear DNA content increased approximately 40 fold following emergence of trophozoites in axenic cultures. Based on the observed large changes in nuclear size and DNA content, and the minor differences in relative abundance of representative protein coding sequences, rDNA and tRNA sequences, it appears that gain or loss of whole genome copies may be occurring during changes in the growth conditions. Our studies demonstrate the inherent plasticity and dynamic nature of the Entamoeba genome in at least two species.
The Cytoplasmic Capping Complex Assembles on Adapter Protein Nck1 Bound to the Proline-Rich C-Terminus of Mammalian Capping Enzyme
Chandrama Mukherjee,Baskar Bakthavachalu,Daniel R. Schoenberg
PLOS Biology , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001933
Abstract: Cytoplasmic capping is catalyzed by a complex that contains capping enzyme (CE) and a kinase that converts RNA with a 5′-monophosphate end to a 5′ diphosphate for subsequent addition of guanylic acid (GMP). We identify the proline-rich C-terminus as a new domain of CE that is required for its participation in cytoplasmic capping, and show the cytoplasmic capping complex assembles on Nck1, an adapter protein with functions in translation and tyrosine kinase signaling. Binding is specific to Nck1 and is independent of RNA. We show by sedimentation and gel filtration that Nck1 and CE are together in a larger complex, that the complex can assemble in vitro on recombinant Nck1, and Nck1 knockdown disrupts the integrity of the complex. CE and the 5′ kinase are juxtaposed by binding to the adjacent domains of Nck1, and cap homeostasis is inhibited by Nck1 with inactivating mutations in each of these domains. These results identify a new domain of CE that is specific to its function in cytoplasmic capping, and a new role for Nck1 in regulating gene expression through its role as the scaffold for assembly of the cytoplasmic capping complex.
Genome-Wide Stochastic Adaptive DNA Amplification at Direct and Inverted DNA Repeats in the Parasite Leishmania
Jean-Michel Ubeda equal contributor,Frédéric Raymond equal contributor,Angana Mukherjee equal contributor,Marie Plourde,Hélène Gingras,Gaétan Roy,Andréanne Lapointe,Philippe Leprohon,Barbara Papadopoulou,Jacques Corbeil,Marc Ouellette
PLOS Biology , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001868
Abstract: Gene amplification of specific loci has been described in all kingdoms of life. In the protozoan parasite Leishmania, the product of amplification is usually part of extrachromosomal circular or linear amplicons that are formed at the level of direct or inverted repeated sequences. A bioinformatics screen revealed that repeated sequences are widely distributed in the Leishmania genome and the repeats are chromosome-specific, conserved among species, and generally present in low copy number. Using sensitive PCR assays, we provide evidence that the Leishmania genome is continuously being rearranged at the level of these repeated sequences, which serve as a functional platform for constitutive and stochastic amplification (and deletion) of genomic segments in the population. This process is adaptive as the copy number of advantageous extrachromosomal circular or linear elements increases upon selective pressure and is reversible when selection is removed. We also provide mechanistic insights on the formation of circular and linear amplicons through RAD51 recombinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. The whole genome of Leishmania is thus stochastically rearranged at the level of repeated sequences, and the selection of parasite subpopulations with changes in the copy number of specific loci is used as a strategy to respond to a changing environment.
Cold agglutinin disease associated with mycoplasma infection in an individual with type 2 diabetes: An atypical case  [PDF]
Chandrama Shrestha, Liu Min, Zhaohui Mo
Journal of Diabetes Mellitus (JDM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jdm.2012.24062
Abstract: Cold Agglutinin Disease is a hemolytic anemia associated with cold reactive autoantibodies. Although the acute form of cold agglutinin disease can be attributed to autoimmune or infectious diseases and lymphoproliferative diseases, it has, to the best of our knowledge, so far,never been reported as secondary to mycoplasma pneumonia in a type 2 diabetic individual. In this paper, we report a case of cold agglutinin disease following mycoplasma pneumonia in a 47-year-old female patient with type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia. Cold agglutinin test and direct Coombs’ test was positive. Anti-mycoplasma anti-body titre by complement fixation was high (Anti-IgG was negative and Anti-C3d was positive) and was accompanied by hemolytic anemia. Her general condition, including Cold Agglutinin Disease improved after conservative therapy with antibiotics, hypoglycemic agents and short-term use of steroids. The patient recuperated and was discharged in good health after 7 days’ stay in the hospital. She remains clinically well with no recurrence of anemia. The simultaneous occurrence of cold agglutinin disease, mycoplasma infection and diabetes mellitus is rare and accumulation of case reports is required to gain better insight of this case scenario.
Hypersensitive to Red and Blue 1 and Its Modification by Protein Phosphatase 7 Are Implicated in the Control of Arabidopsis Stomatal Aperture
Xiaodong Sun equal contributor,Xiaojun Kang equal contributor,Min Ni
PLOS Genetics , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002674
Abstract: The stomatal pores are located on the plant leaf epidermis and regulate CO2 uptake for photosynthesis and the loss of water by transpiration. Their stomatal aperture therefore affects photosynthesis, water use efficiency, and agricultural crop yields. Blue light, one of the environmental signals that regulates the plant stomatal aperture, is perceived by the blue/UV-A light-absorbing cryptochromes and phototropins. The signal transduction cascades that link the perception of light to the stomatal opening response are still largely unknown. Here, we report two new players, Hypersensitive to Red and Blue 1 (HRB1) and Protein Phosphatase 7 (PP7), and their genetic and biochemical interactions in the control of stomatal aperture. Mutations in either HRB1 or PP7 lead to the misregulation of the stomatal aperture and reduce water loss under blue light. Both HRB1 and PP7 are expressed in the guard cells in response to a light-to-dark or dark-to-light transition. HRB1 interacts with PP7 through its N-terminal ZZ-type zinc finger motif and requires a functional PP7 for its stomatal opening response. HRB1 is phosphorylated in vivo, and PP7 can dephosphorylate HRB1. HRB1 is mostly dephosphorylated in a protein complex of 193 kDa in the dark, and blue light increases complex size to 285 kDa. In the pp7 mutant, this size shift is impaired, and HRB1 is predominately phosphorylated. We propose that a modification of HRB1 by PP7 under blue light is essential to acquire a proper conformation or to bring in new components for the assembly of a functional HRB1 protein complex. Guard cells control stomatal opening in response to multiple environmental or biotic stimuli. This study may furnish strategies that allow plants to enjoy the advantages of both constitutive and ABA-induced protection under water-limiting conditions.
Kinetics of Mosquito-Injected Plasmodium Sporozoites in Mice: Fewer Sporozoites Are Injected into Sporozoite-Immunized Mice
Chahnaz Kebaier equal contributor,Tatiana Voza equal contributor,Jerome Vanderberg
PLOS Pathogens , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000399
Abstract: Malaria is initiated when the mosquito introduces sporozoites into the skin of a mammalian host. To successfully continue the infection, sporozoites must invade blood vessels in the dermis and be transported to the liver. A significant number of sporozoites, however, may enter lymphatic vessels in the skin or remain in the skin long after the mosquito bite. We have used fluorescence microscopy of Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing a fluorescent protein to evaluate the kinetics of sporozoite disappearance from the skin. Sporozoites injected into immunized mice were rapidly immobilized, did not appear to invade dermal blood vessels and became morphologically degraded within several hours. Strikingly, mosquitoes introduced significantly fewer sporozoites into immunized than into non-immunized mice, presumably by formation of an immune complex between soluble sporozoite antigens in the mosquito saliva and homologous host antibodies at the proboscis tip. These results indicate that protective antibodies directed against sporozoites may function both by reducing the numbers of sporozoites injected into immunized hosts and by inhibiting the movement of injected sporozoites into dermal blood vessels.
Sarcomere Formation Occurs by the Assembly of Multiple Latent Protein Complexes
Yanning Rui equal contributor ,Jianwu Bai equal contributor,Norbert Perrimon
PLOS Genetics , 2010, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1001208
Abstract: The stereotyped striation of myofibrils is a conserved feature of muscle organization that is critical to its function. Although most components that constitute the basic myofibrils are well-characterized biochemically and are conserved across the animal kingdom, the mechanisms leading to the precise assembly of sarcomeres, the basic units of myofibrils, are poorly understood. To gain insights into this process, we investigated the functional relationships of sarcomeric protein complexes. Specifically, we systematically analyzed, using either RNAi in primary muscle cells or available genetic mutations, the organization of myofibrils in Drosophila muscles that lack one or more sarcomeric proteins. Our study reveals that the thin and thick filaments are mutually dependent on each other for striation. Further, the tension sensor complex comprised of zipper/Zasp/α-actinin is involved in stabilizing the sarcomere but not in its initial formation. Finally, integrins appear essential for the interdigitation of thin and thick filaments that occurs prior to striation. Thus, sarcomere formation occurs by the coordinated assembly of multiple latent protein complexes, as opposed to sequential assembly.
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