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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 4014 matches for " Caroline Broc "
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Berlin, métropole culturelle.
Caroline Broc
EspacesTemps.net , 2003,
Abstract: Nous livrant une lecture de la ville de Berlin, Boris Grésillon s'attache à montrer la pertinence de la géographie pour comprendre non seulement un lieu mais aussi l'ensemble de la société qui le constitue. Berlin est une ville atypique, ne serait-ce que par le fait qu'elle a un centre géographique constitué des périphéries de la partition d'après-guerre ; ainsi l' il s'étonne de repérer un vide en guise de centre (p. 5). Outre le choix de ce cas ...
A Longitudinal Study of Academic Success and Failure in Compulsory Secondary Education and Baccalaureate Students through the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI)  [PDF]
Miguel ángel Broc
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.612139
Abstract: Aretrospective longitudinal study of a final sample of 311 Spanish students in compulsory secondary education (CSE) and baccalaureate (BAC) between 1 and 6 years after administration of MACI was conducted by analyzing “a posteriori” if they were able to graduate or not in CSE, as well as some form of baccalaureate. The effects of factors such as grade, sex and graduate/urdergraduate were studied over measured variables by MACI, related with personality traits, the concerns expressed and clinical syndromes. Looking retrospectively if emerging patterns of certain personality variables characterizing students as a function of previous factors, statistically significant variables (p < 0.05) that clearly differentiate these types of students are detected based on sex, in fourteen scales scores are higher for women, with predominance of internalizing trend and with a large effect size in variables as body disapproval (0.81) and eating disorders (0.87), and in six scales boys with externalizing trend and a large effect of sex factor on the variable predisposition to delinquency (0.81) as well as between different types of academic performance, especially undergraduate students in scales 2A, 6B, 9, B, G and H. Finally, references to clinical intervention techniques and educational community services, in Spain, are proposed.
The Class of Language: Examining Rhetoric, Children’s Social Education, and Pedagogy in Economically Distinct Classrooms  [PDF]
Caroline C.
Creative Education (CE) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2018.93024
Abstract: My paper examines the uses of language in a Rochester city public elementary school compared to the uses of language in a suburban, accelerated after school program. The goal of this research was to address how language is employed in these two classrooms and if rhetorical variations between the two are indicative of their community’s economic, social, and racial differences. From my experience working at each facility, I was able to observe how specific language operates and in what context over the course of three weeks. I consulted visual, auditory, and carefully written recordings of structured classes and of free time at each facility. As a result, I have located salient differences in the way two institutions of disparate levels of income negotiate language and how that “class-coded” language affects the students. Namely, these differences delineate the following: what are considered appropriate and forbidden words around children, disciplinary tactics believed to be most effective, strategies in executing effective lesson plans, and types of social bonding within the classroom. Depending on how teachers use language in the classroom, children receive starkly different structural education as well as social education. Thus, examining different classrooms’ language choices and their effects on students allows us to adapt our language and elevate children’s education in any classroom, regardless of economic status.
Application of “Swanson’s Middle Range Caring Theory” in Sweden after miscarriage  [PDF]
Caroline Jansson, Annsofie Adolfsson
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2011.22021
Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to apply Swanson’s Middle Range Caring Theory to the follow-up visit with a midwife for Swedish women who have suffered early miscarriage or received care for late missed miscarriage in preg-nancy week 18-20. Methods: Twenty-five tape recorded interviews with women four weeks after their early miscarriages and thirteen tape recorded semi-structured interviews with midwives and nurses who had the experience of caring for women who have been diagnosed with a missed miscarriage during a routine ultrasound scan. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and interpreted deductively from the text using the theory. Results: Each woman described her personal experience of miscarriage in the relative terms of a human experience. The midwives and nurses described their experiences with women who received care for missed miscarriage. The interviews included information about the treatment provided by the caregivers during the period afterward of the diagnosis. The caregiver attitude was formed from Swanson’s caring categories: “Maintaining belief”, “knowing”, “being with”, “doing for”, “enabling”. Conclusions: Swanson’s Middle Range Caring Theory as applied to the caregiver includes being emotionally present, giving support with respect for the woman’s dignity, being competent, meeting each woman’s own individual needs. Given the proper care after a miscarriage every woman has the power within herself to improve their wellbeing.
Finding Optimal Allocation of Constrained Cloud Capacity Using Hyperbolic Voronoi Diagrams on the Sphere  [PDF]
Shanthi Shanmugam, Caroline Shouraboura
Intelligent Information Management (IIM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/iim.2012.425035
Abstract: We consider a network of computer data centers on the earth surface delivering computing as a service to a big number of users. The problem is to assign users to data centers to minimize the total communication distance between compu-ting resources and their users in the face of capacity constrained datacenters. In this paper, we extend the classical pla-nar Voronoi Diagram to a hyperbolic Voronoi Diagram on the sphere. We show that a solution to the distance minimi-zation problem under capacity constraints is given by a hyperbolic spherical Voronoi Diagram of data centers. We also present numerical algorithms, computer implementation and results of simulations illustrating our solution. We note applicability of our solution to other important assignment problems, including the assignment of population to regional trauma centers, location of airbases, the distribution of the telecommunication centers for mobile telephones in global telephone companies, and others.
Elderly patients with very late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis and early-onset schizophrenia: Cross-sectional and retrospective clinical findings  [PDF]
Caroline Girard, Martine Simard
Open Journal of Psychiatry (OJPsych) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojpsych.2012.24043
Abstract: Objectives: The aim of this study was to characterize the symptoms at onset/past and current symptoms of patients with Very Late-Onset Schizophrenia-Like Psychosis (VLOSLP; first onset of psychotic symptoms at/or after 60 years old) with those of elderly patients diagnosed with schizophrenia before the age of 40 years old (Early-Onset Schizophrenia—EOS) in order to validate the clinical nosology proposed by the International Late-Onset Schizophrenia Group. Methods: This is a between-patient comparison study with retrospective and current data taken from an historical cohort that was conducted from May/2005 to August/2008. Seventeen VLOSLP and 17 EOS were included. Schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychotic disorders were initially diagnosed by board-certified psychiatrists with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Criteria at use at onset of the disorders. Patients’ symptoms were assessed with the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). The general scores on the SAPS/SANS were the primary outcomes. Results: Both groups had hallucinations and delusions at onset of the disease, but the following symptoms were more present and severe in EOS than in VLOSLP: hallucinations (p = 0.001); assiduity loss (p < 0.001); grandiosity (p = 0.001), reference (p < 0.001) and influence (p = 0.001) delusions. VLOSLP had mostly persecutory delusions. At current evaluation (follow-up of cohort), most patients in the two groups presented residual symptoms of anhedonia and apathy, but EOS, presented more symptoms of friendship poverty (d = 1.42, large effect size) than VLOSLP. The neuroimaging studies (when available) at follow-up demonstrated greater vascular cerebral lesions/vulnerability in VLOSLP than in EOS patients. Conclusion: This study showed that both VLOSLP and EOS had positive and negative symptoms in the past/at onset of the disease, but they were more severe in EOS than in VLOSLP. However, the positive symptoms of both groups at follow-up of the cohort (current evaluation) responded relatively well to neuroleptics.
Hospital-Acquired Anaemia Secondary to Phlebotomy in Elderly Patients  [PDF]
Divya Tiwari, Caroline Rance
Advances in Aging Research (AAR) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aar.2014.32012
Abstract:


Introduction: Anaemia contributes to increased morbidity and mortality in hospitalised patients, yet unnecessary blood tests from inpatients may actually induce a “hospital acquired anaemia” (HAA). This study examines the incidence of phlebotomy-induced anaemia during a hospital admission. Methods: Patients admitted to the Royal Bournemouth Hospital between 2009 and 2011 for a period of more than two weeks were identified. Those with normal haemoglobins on admission (Hb > 130 g/dL in men; Hb > 120 g/dL in women) were selected to be included in the study. One hundred and sixty two patients were randomly selected from this group and their admission and discharge haemoglobin was recorded, and the change in Hb was calculated. The number of blood tests taken during admission was calculated from each patient from which volume of blood lost was determined. Age, sex and co-morbidities, bleeding complications and blood transfusions were noted. T-test for unequal variance was used for analysis. Results: Of the 162 patients, 69 (42.5%) developed a HAA (defined as haemoglobin drop from normal to <110 g/dL). The average number of blood tests taken in the anaemia group was 37, compared to only 23 in the “no-anaemia” group. i.e. 132 mls in the anaemia group vs. only 80.2 mls in no-anaemia group. Further analysis of the anaemia group revealed that 40 patients developed a “mild anaemia” (defined as drop in Hb from normal to <110 g/dL) and 29 developed a moderate/severe anaemia (drop from a normal Hb at admission to <100 g/dL). Significantly higher volume of blood was withdrawn from this moderate/severe anaemia group compared to those that developed a mild anaemia 177.9 mls vs. 121.34 mls (p-Value 0.007, F = 0.001) 95% CI 2.08 to 9.22. Conclusion: This study suggests that patients admitted for inpatient stays of more than two weeks may be at high risk of HAA as a consequence of diagnostic blood loss. This anaemia in turn may have detrimental consequences, especially in patients with pre-existing cardio-respiratory disease. There needs to be increased awareness of the risk posed to patients as a result of diagnostic phlebotomy and further studies are required to study its impact on LOS, morbidity and mortality outcomes.

Use of an In-Class Sensory Activity Schedule for a Student with Autism: Critical Case Study  [PDF]
Caroline Mills, Christine Chapparo
Creative Education (CE) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2016.77102
Abstract: Many students with autism and intellectual disability demonstrate atypical sensory behaviours which impact on their schooling. Few studies provide empirical support for teachers using planned sensory activities in special education classrooms. Aim: To determine whether a classroom based Sensory Activity Schedule (SAS) improves behavioural outcomes for one student with ASD who demonstrated atypical sensory processing and associated challenging behaviour. Methods: Critical case study methods were used to describe changes in the frequency of challenging behaviour “incidents” recorded for one eight year old student with autism over one school term during implementation of a Sensory Activity Schedule. Results: There was a reduction in the reported frequency of challenging behaviour incidents which were associated with sensory triggers over one school term. Conclusion: When applied with caution, in context, and with appropriate training, a Sensory Activity Schedule was associated with a reduction in challenging behaviour incidents for one student with autism during classroom activities.
A Step Closer to Local Carbon Calculations: Growth Timescales and Linear Relationships for Sand Forest and Woodland Tree Species in Maputaland, South Africa  [PDF]
Jerome Gaugris, Caroline A. Vasicek
Open Journal of Forestry (OJF) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2014.43029
Abstract:

In Africa, information on time required for plants to develop from seed to mean size and maximum size is scarce. There is also a lack of information regarding accurate relationships between stem diameter, height and canopy dimensions. This type of information is however becoming a real necessity to allow the accurate measurement of carbon stocks and carbon stocks change to qualify for the UNFCCC’s REDD+ mechanism. We evaluated these parameters for 22 Sand Forest and woodland tree species of South Africa’s Maputaland. Results indicated that it takes approximately 66 and 35 years for current dynamics of Sand Forests and woodlands to occur respectively. Based on diameter and growth rates, larger trees of the forests can be older than 600 years, while large woodland trees can reach ages of 900 years. Our evaluation of linear relationships between stem diameter, height and canopy dimensions showed extremely robust results allowing the use of stem diameter to calculate height and canopy dimensions. The results are of interest for carbon related investigations and reconstructing stands dynamics.

Allozyme variation in natural populations of Lymantria dispar (Lepidoptera)
Caroline George
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1984, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-16-1-1
Abstract:
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