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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1880 matches for " Carina Nilsson "
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Neuroprotection by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A in a model of lipopolysaccharide-sensitised neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury
Bobbi Fleiss, Marie KL Nilsson, Klas Blomgren, Carina Mallard
Journal of Neuroinflammation , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1742-2094-9-70
Abstract: On postnatal day 8 (P8), male and female mice were exposed to LPS together with or without TSA. On P9 (14 hours after LPS), mice were exposed to HI (50 minutes at 10% O2). Neuropathology was assessed at 24 hours, 5?days and 27?days post-LPS/HI via immunohistochemistry and/or Western blot analysis for markers of grey matter (microtubule-associated protein 2), white matter (myelin basic protein) and cell death (activated caspase-3). Effects of TSA on LPS or LPS/HI-induced inflammation (cytokines and microglia number) were assessed by Luminex assay and immunohistochemistry. Expression of acetylation-dependent oligodendrocyte maturational corepressors was assessed with quantitative PCR 6 hours after LPS and at 24 hours and 27?days post-LPS/HI. Animal behaviour was monitored with the open-field and trace fear-conditioning paradigms at 25?days post-LPS/HI to identify functional implications of changes in neuropathology associated with TSA treatment.TSA induced increased Ac-H4 in females only after LPS exposure. Also only in females, TSA reduced grey matter and white matter injury at 5?days post-LPS/HI. Treatment altered animal behaviour in the open field and improved learning in the fear-conditioning test in females compared with LPS/HI-only females at 25?days post-HI. None of the inflammatory mechanisms assessed that are known to mediate neuroprotection by HDACi in adults correlated with improved outcome in TSA-treated neonatal females. Oligodendrocyte maturation was not different between the LPS-only and LPS + TSA-treated mice before or after exposure to HI.Hyperacetylation with TSA is neuroprotective in the female neonatal mouse following LPS/HI and correlates with improved learning long-term. TSA appears to exert neuroprotection via mechanisms unique to the neonate. Deciphering the effects of age, sex and inflammatory sensitisation in the cerebral response to HDACi is key to furthering the potential of hyperacetylation as a viable neuroprotectant. TSA did not impair o
The Transfer of Knowledge between Younger and Older Employees in the Health and Medical Care: An Intervention Study  [PDF]
Emma Nilsson, Kerstin Nilsson
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.57006
Abstract: In the ageing society more old employees need to stay in working life for longer. However, the society also needs to take care of the increased amount of elderly in a more effective and respectful way. To take care of older employees experience knowledge to make the elderly care and the care employees work situation better and self-crediting to go on in an extended working life, new methods and measures are needed to be developed and evaluated. The overall purpose of this article was to evaluate how the participant in the intervention project experienced the project and its methodology. The intervention project followed three different methods: i) through interviews of the participants and the supervisor; ii) through participant observation; and iii) through an evaluation questionnaire to participants after the project was completed. The intervention project did transfer knowledge between different fields, that are, between generations, between different departments and between the municipality and county. The participation was described as not only a place for reflection and knowledge, but also a protected zone where participants could talk about the kind of problems they would ponder over. Several participants felt that it was important to develop and continue the work that the intervention project set in motion. The participants’ experience was made to be visible and their professional competence has been strengthened. They indicated that there had been an exchange of knowledge and between not only the generations but also the different kinds of work. The organisations also seem to have gained from the project by allowing the participants to unload, become more positive, develop more knowledge of experience, increase their propensity for reflection and get a better consensus between the municipality and county. The intervention project seems to have fulfilled the stated purpose and also the expectations of the participants.
Comparison of Measurements of Autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase and Islet Antigen-2 in Whole Blood Eluates from Dried Blood Spots Using the RSR-Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kits and In-House Radioimmunoassays
Anders Persson,Charlotte Becker,Ida Hansson,Anita Nilsson,Carina T rn
Experimental Diabetes Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/173652
Abstract: To evaluate the performance of dried blood spots (DBSs) with subsequent analyses of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) with the RSR-ELISAs, we selected 80 children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 120 healthy women. DBSs from patients and controls were used for RSR-ELISAs while patients samples were analysed also with in-house RIAs. The RSR-ELISA-GADA performed well with a specificity of 100%, albeit sensitivity (46%) was lower compared to in RIA (56%; =.008). No prozone effect was observed after dilution of discrepant samples. RSR-ELISA-IA-2A achieved specificity of 69% and sensitivity was lower (59%) compared with RIA (66%; <.001). Negative or low positive patients and control samples in the RSR-ELISA-IA-2A increased after dilution. Eluates from DBS can readily be used to analyse GADA with the RSR-ELISA, even if low levels of autoantibodies were not detected. Some factor could disturb RSR-ELISA-IA-2A analyses.
Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments
Carina Wennerholm, Bj?rn Grip, Annakarin Johansson, Hans Nilsson, Marja-Liisa Honkasalo, Tomas Faresj?
International Journal of Health Geographics , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1476-072x-10-5
Abstract: We focused on the total population in two neighbour and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants each. These twin cities represent two different social environments in the same Swedish county. According to their social history they could be labelled a "blue-collar" and a "white-collar" city. Morbidity data for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care. The morbidity data presented are cumulative incidence rates and the data on mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish statistics.The cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women revealed significantly differences for studied cardiovascular diagnoses. The occurrence rates were in all aspects highest in the population of the "blue-collar" twin city for both sexes.This study revealed that there are significant differences in risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the populations in the studied different social environments. These differences seem to be profound and stable over time and thereby give implication for public health policy to initiate a community intervention program in the "blue-collar" twin city.In Sweden mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) gradually increased from the beginning of the 20th century until the 1960s, when this trend reached a plateau during the 1970s and thereafter in the beginning of the 1980s decreased for both men and women with 50% the last two decades in Sweden as in other industrialised countries [1,2]. This decline in cardiovascular mortality could be explained by two factors: the risk of developing heart infarction has decreased due to better lifestyle and the chance of surviving a heart attack has increased [3-5]. Both incidence of and mortality due to CHD are today significantly higher in subjects with low socio-economic status [6]. In
Using Information and Communication Technology in Home Care for Communication between Patients, Family Members, and Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review
Birgitta Lindberg,Carina Nilsson,Daniel Zotterman,Siv S?derberg,Lisa Sk?r
International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/461829
Abstract: Introduction. Information and communication technology (ICT) are becoming a natural part in healthcare both for delivering and giving accessibility to healthcare for people with chronic illness living at home. Aim. The aim was to review existing studies describing the use of ICT in home care for communication between patients, family members, and healthcare professionals. Methods. A review of studies was conducted that identified 1,276 studies. A selection process and quality appraisal were conducted, which finally resulted in 107 studies. Results. The general results offer an overview of characteristics of studies describing the use of ICT applications in home care and are summarized in areas including study approach, quality appraisal, publications data, terminology used for defining the technology, and disease diagnosis. The specific results describe how communication with ICT was performed in home care and the benefits and drawbacks with the use of ICT. Results were predominated by positive responses in the use of ICT. Conclusion. The use of ICT applications in home care is an expanding research area, with a variety of ICT tools used that could increase accessibility to home care. Using ICT can lead to people living with chronic illnesses gaining control of their illness that promotes self-care. 1. Introduction Due to an ageing population and a shortage of hospital beds, it has become a challenge to find new ways to support and care for people with chronic illness living at home. Living with chronic illness changes the lives of those affected, who are often in need of support and nursing care in their homes [1–3]. eHealth has the potential to become a means of providing good care at home [4], which is especially challenging with regard to this emerging field [5]. eHealth refers to information and communication technology (ICT) tools and services for health, whether the tools are used behind the scenes by healthcare professionals or directly by patients and their relatives [6]. ICT tools can be used to access a wide variety of technological solutions for communication, including text messaging, gathering and monitoring data, diagnosis and treatment at distances, and retrieving electronic health records [5, 7]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) [8], eHealth is used in the healthcare for transmission of digital data, including data stored and retrieved electronically to support healthcare, both at the local site and at a distance. E-Health includes the interaction between patients and health service providers or peer-to-peer
Comparison of Measurements of Autoantibodies to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase and Islet Antigen-2 in Whole Blood Eluates from Dried Blood Spots Using the RSR-Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kits and In-House Radioimmunoassays
Anders Persson,Charlotte Becker,Ida Hansson,Anita Nilsson,Carina T?rn
Journal of Diabetes Research , 2010, DOI: 10.1155/2010/173652
Abstract: To evaluate the performance of dried blood spots (DBSs) with subsequent analyses of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) with the RSR-ELISAs, we selected 80 children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 120 healthy women. DBSs from patients and controls were used for RSR-ELISAs while patients samples were analysed also with in-house RIAs. The RSR-ELISA-GADA performed well with a specificity of 100%, albeit sensitivity (46%) was lower compared to in RIA (56%; ). No prozone effect was observed after dilution of discrepant samples. RSR-ELISA-IA-2A achieved specificity of 69% and sensitivity was lower (59%) compared with RIA (66%; ). Negative or low positive patients and control samples in the RSR-ELISA-IA-2A increased after dilution. Eluates from DBS can readily be used to analyse GADA with the RSR-ELISA, even if low levels of autoantibodies were not detected. Some factor could disturb RSR-ELISA-IA-2A analyses. 1. Introduction Sampling of blood as dried blood spots (DBSs) for clinical use is currently used for such diverse diseases as congenital metabolic disorders, diabetes, and HIV infections [1–4]. There are a number of advantages gained when using the DBS-technique with subsequent elution concerning ease of collection, transportation/storage, small blood volumes, and minimal invasiveness compared with serum samples. DBS-technique facilitates sampling procedures since capillary sampling can be used. The capillary blood sampling requires less skill and fewer supplies, it can even be used by diabetes patients at home if they are used to measuring their own blood glucose levels. DBS samples can easily be mailed since there is no risk of leakage. Both transportation and short time storage can be done at room temperature [5, 6]. In many countries, all newborn babies are screened for phenylketonuria, galactosemia, congenital hypothyroidism, and other metabolic disorders using dried blood spots, indicating that this technique is suitable for large scale analyses [7–9]. The DBS-samples can be used for both genetic factors (DNA) [10] and proteins (enzymes and antibodies) [5, 11]. Five islet autoantibodies are known to characterize type 1 diabetes, namely, islet cell antibodies (ICA), insulin autoantibodies (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA), islet antigen-2 antibodies (IA-2A), and antibodies against the beta cell specific zink-transporter (ZnT8A) [12]. The first four of these are well characterized and several workshops have been undertaken to standardize the measurement of these autoantibodies in serum [13–15].
Active and Healthy Ageing at Work—A Qualitative Study with Employees 55 - 63 Years and Their Managers  [PDF]
Kerstin Nilsson
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.57002
Abstract: The proportion of elderly individuals in the population is increasing in most industrial countries. This demographic change increases the need of more people who work until an older age to maintain the welfare in the states. However, it is not clear if older employees are interested to in generally extend the working life to an older age. It is also not stated if managers in organizations are interested of extending their older employees working life. The overall aim of this study was to examine older employees own experience of their work situation and ageing at work. The aim was also to investigate their managers’ attitude to them as older employees. The investigation was conducted by focusing group interviews with employees aged 55 - 63 years, and with their mangers aged 40 - 63 years. The findings stated that the older employees’ consideration for an extend working life seemed to be based on their health and health problems in relation to their work situation; their personal economy; their managers attitude to them as elderly and the possibility to social inclusion at work; and their possibilities for self-crediting activities at work despite their age. The managers seem to have a positive attitude to some of the older employees’ experience knowledge, if that was in the same direction as their own interest. Otherwise the mangers saw the older employees as problem and obsoleted. The managers were also negative to older employees who got health problems which effect the work production negatively. The older workers in this study described managers’ importance to if they want to work in an extended working life. However, the managers seem not to understand their own importance in this and were not interested to keep all elderly in an extended working life.
The Influence of Work Environmental and Motivation Factors on Seniors’ Attitudes to an Extended Working Life or to Retire. A Cross Sectional Study with Employees 55 - 74 Years of Age  [PDF]
Kerstin Nilsson
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2017.57003
Abstract: Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate difference between whether individuals think they can work, and want to work until 65 years or not. Methods: A cross/sectional study including survey of 1949 employees aged 55 - 74 years. Results: Working environments were the most significant differences between the groups associated to if the respondents think they can work beyond 65 years or not. Motivation factors were the most significant differences between the groups associated with if the respondents want to work beyond 65 years or not. Conclusions: A satisfying work environment is important to whether people think they can work or not. Nevertheless, whether people want to work is depending on whether the employees are satisfied with the factors that promote their motivation for work. If society wants more people to work until an upper age, it is important to improve both work environmental factors and motivation factors in their work situation.
Dissimilarities in Social Support as Described by Swedish- and Foreign-Born Persons Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and Living in Sweden  [PDF]
Katarina Hjelm, Carina Berter?
Open Journal of Nursing (OJN) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojn.2014.43025
Abstract:

Diabetes (DM) requires self-care that is demanding and may cause stress. Social support can buffer effects of stress. No previous study has been found comparing perceptions of foreign-born persons with DM, concerning the content of and need for social support with a population of origin. The aim was to compare the meaning of support and its impact on the life situation in Swedish- and foreign-born persons diagnosed with type 2 DM living in Sweden. A purposive sample of 74 persons; 34 foreign- and 40 Swedish-born, aged 32-80 years, diagnosed with type 2 DM, was included. The foreign-born persons were mostly Middle Eastern and Ex-Yugoslavian refugees. Mixed methods were used and data were collected by qualitative interviews and quantitative data collected by the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire (NSSQ). Studying the figures measured by NSSQ, no significant differences were found according to gender but foreign-born men scored lower than Swedish, especially in emotional support and aid. The main findings showed that respondents, irrespective of origin, described the meaning of the concept of support mainly as information support in learning to manage DM. However, foreign-born persons also focused on medical support with regular follow-ups while Swedes emphasized the need for emotional support. Foreign- and Swedish-born persons are in general more similar than dissimilar in describing the meaning, need and impact of support. Irrespective of origin they want to learn to manage their disease and thus desire and need regular follow-up and information immediately from being diagnosed. Further studies are needed as the study is based on a limited sample.

Parkinson’s disease and affective disorder: The temporal relationship  [PDF]
Flemming M?rkeberg Nilsson
Open Journal of Psychiatry (OJPsych) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojpsych.2012.22014
Abstract: In relationship between the affective disorders and Parkinson’s disease (PD) it was found that comorbidity was higher than expected in the majority of the studies. Patients with PD are at increased risk of developing depression and, conversely, recent studies have shown that patients with depressive disorders have increased risk of incident PD. However, the temporal associations between the disorders are not fully elucidated. From this review it could be learned that the temporal aspects strongly suggest that a neurobiological association exists between affective disorder and PD. This is illustrated with hitherto unpublished data. Some of these issues may be investigated in case register studies, e.g. by linkage of registers of somatic and psychiatric illness, and suggestions for future research are given. For GP’s, psychiatrists, geriatricians, and neurologists these new findings will lead to a better understanding and better treatment for patients with complicated comorbid conditions. Here timing is important!
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