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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5179 matches for " Byung-Cheul Shin "
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Randomized Clinical Trials on Acupuncture in Korean Literature: A Systematic Review
Jae Cheol Kong,Myeong Soo Lee,Byung-Cheul Shin
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2009, DOI: 10.1093/ecam/nem130
Abstract: The aim of this systematic review was to summarize randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of acupuncture as published in Korean literature. Systematic searches were conducted on eight Korean medical databases. Manual searches were also conducted through eight major Korean medical journals. The methodological quality was assessed using a Jadad score. Studies evaluating needle acupuncture or auricular acupuncture (AA) with or without electrical stimulation were considered if they were sham or placebo-controlled or controlled against a comparative intervention. We also excluded acupuncture as an adjuvant to other treatments and other forms of acupuncture were excluded. Seven hundred and nine possibly relevant studies were identified and 10 RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally poor. Manual acupuncture was compared to placebo acupuncture in four studies of patients with chronic low back pain, shoulder pain, premenstrual syndrome and allergic rhinitis. Three studies tested AA (two trials) and electroacupuncture (one trial) against no treatment, while three trials compared acupuncture with other active therapeutic controls. The methodological limitations of the included trials make their contribution to the current clinical evidence of acupuncture somewhat limited. The trial for premenstrual syndrome, shoulder pain and chronic low back pain added a limited contribution among those included RCTs. However, well-designed RCTs of acupuncture with a rigorous methodology are in progress or have been completed in Korea and will contribute to establish or contribute to the current progress of research in this field.
Randomized Clinical Trials of Constitutional Acupuncture: A Systematic Review
Myeong Soo Lee,Byung-Cheul Shin,Sun-Mi Choi,Jong Yeol Kim
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2009, DOI: 10.1093/ecam/nep085
Abstract: The aim of this systematic review is to compile and critically evaluate the evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of acupuncture using constitutional medicine compared to standard acupuncture. Ten databases were searched through to December 2008 without language restrictions. We also hand-searched nine Korean journals of oriental medicine. We included prospective RCTs of any form of acupuncture with or without electrical stimulation. The included trials had to investigate constitutional medicine. There were no restrictions on population characteristics. Forty-one relevant studies were identified, and three RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was variable. One RCT found Sasang constitutional acupuncture to be superior to standard acupuncture in terms of the Unified PD Rating Scale and freezing gate in Parkinson's disease (PD). Another two RCTs reported favorable effects of eight constitutional acupuncture on pain reduction in patients with herniated nucleus pulposi and knee osteoarthritis. Meta-analysis demonstrated positive results for eight constitutional acupuncture compared to standard acupuncture on pain reduction (weighted mean difference: 10 cm VAS, 1.69, 95% CI 0.85–2.54, P < 0.0001; heterogeneity: τ2 = 0.00, Χ2 = 0.00, P = 0.96, I2 = 0%). Our results provide suggestive evidence for the effectiveness of constitutional acupuncture in treating pain conditions compared to standard acupuncture. However, the total number of RCTs and the total sample size included in our analysis were too small to draw definite conclusions. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples with longer treatment periods and appropriate controls.
Maca (L. meyenii) for improving sexual function: a systematic review
Byung-Cheul Shin, Myeong Soo Lee, Eun Jin Yang, Hyun-Suk Lim, Edzard Ernst
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-10-44
Abstract: We searched 17 databases from their inception to April 2010 and included all randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of any type of maca compared to a placebo for the treatment of healthy people or human patients with sexual dysfunction. The risk of bias for each study was assessed using Cochrane criteria, and statistical pooling of data was performed where possible. The selection of studies, data extraction, and validations were performed independently by two authors. Discrepancies were resolved through discussion by the two authors.Four RCTs met all the inclusion criteria. Two RCTs suggested a significant positive effect of maca on sexual dysfunction or sexual desire in healthy menopausal women or healthy adult men, respectively, while the other RCT failed to show any effects in healthy cyclists. The further RCT assessed the effects of maca in patients with erectile dysfunction using the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 and showed significant effects.The results of our systematic review provide limited evidence for the effectiveness of maca in improving sexual function. However, the total number of trials, the total sample size, and the average methodological quality of the primary studies were too limited to draw firm conclusions. More rigorous studies are warranted.Sexual problems (or sexual dysfunction) are widespread and adversely affect mood, well-being, and interpersonal relationships [1]. They occur in 20%-30% of men and 40-45% of women according to 18 descriptive epidemiological studies from around the world [2]. Most sexual problems relate to sexual desire (interest in sex) in both females and males and male erectile dysfunction (ED) [2]. Current pharmacological interventions for the management of sexual problems include oral drugs, intrapenile therapies (intra-urethral suppositories and intracavernous injections) and penile prosthesis implantation for males and hormonal therapy for females. Although considerable advances have been made, the ideal
Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials
Young-Dae Kim,In Heo,Byung-Cheul Shin,Cindy Crawford
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/615857
Abstract:
Acupuncture for Spinal Cord Injury and Its Complications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
In Heo,Byung-Cheul Shin,Young-Dae Kim,Eui-Hyoung Hwang
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/364216
Abstract:
Electroacupuncture Acutely Improves Cerebral Blood Flow and Attenuates Moderate Ischemic Injury via an Endothelial Mechanism in Mice
Ji Hyun Kim, Kyung Ha Choi, Young Jung Jang, Sun Sik Bae, Byung-Cheul Shin, Byung Tae Choi, Hwa Kyoung Shin
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056736
Abstract: Electroacupuncture (EA) is a novel therapy based on traditional acupuncture combined with modern eletrotherapy that is currently being investigated as a treatment for acute ischemic stroke. Here, we studied whether acute EA stimulation improves tissue and functional outcome following experimentally induced cerebral ischemia in mice. We hypothesized that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated perfusion augmentation was related to the beneficial effects of EA by interventions in acute ischemic injury. EA stimulation at Baihui (GV20) and Dazhui (GV14) increased cerebral perfusion in the cerebral cortex, which was suppressed in eNOS KO, but there was no mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) response. The increased perfusion elicited by EA were completely abolished by a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) blocker (atropine), but not a β-adrenergic receptor blocker (propranolol), an α-adrenergic receptor blocker (phentolamine), or a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blocker (mecamylamine). In addition, EA increased acetylcholine (ACh) release and mAChR M3 expression in the cerebral cortex. Acute EA stimulation after occlusion significantly reduced infarct volume by 34.5% when compared to a control group of mice at 24 h after 60 min-middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) (moderate ischemic injury), but not 90-min MCAO (severe ischemic injury). Furthermore, the impact of EA on moderate ischemic injury was totally abolished in eNOS KO. Consistent with a smaller infarct size, acute EA stimulation led to prominent improvement of neurological function and vestibule-motor function. Our results suggest that acute EA stimulation after moderate focal cerebral ischemia, but not severe ischemia improves tissue and functional recovery and ACh/eNOS-mediated perfusion augmentation might be related to these beneficial effects of EA by interventions in acute ischemic injury.
Traditional Medicine in China, Korea, and Japan: A Brief Introduction and Comparison
Hye-Lim Park,Hun-Soo Lee,Byung-Cheul Shin,Jian-Ping Liu,Qinghua Shang,Hitoshi Yamashita,Byungmook Lim
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/429103
Abstract: Background and Purpose. Traditional medicine (TM) has been widely used in China (including the Taiwan region), Korea, and Japan. The purposes of this paper are to summarize the basic data on TM systems in these three countries and to compare them in terms of overall policy, education, and insurance. Methods. Government websites, national statistics, and authoritative papers from each country were fully searched. Further data were gathered by TM experts from each country. Results. China and Korea showed similar patterns in TM systems, whereas Japan showed different patterns. In China and Korea, TM was practiced in a dual system with conventional medicine (CM), and TM education was 6-year training programs on average for TM doctors, and acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping were completely insured. Whereas, CM was dominant in Japan, and TM was practiced by each health care worker who has received different TM education respectively, and main TM therapies were partially insured. Conclusions. TM was developed similarly or somewhat differently based on differences in cultural background and national policies in East Asia. We cautiously propose that this study could contribute to the development of TM and also be used for reference in complementary and alternative medicine systems.
Impact of Including Korean Randomized Controlled Trials in Cochrane Reviews of Acupuncture
Kun Hyung Kim,Jae Cheol Kong,Jun-Yong Choi,Tae-Young Choi,Byung-Cheul Shin,Steve McDonald,Myeong Soo Lee
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047619
Abstract: Acupuncture is commonly practiced in Korea and is regularly evaluated in clinical trials. Although many Cochrane reviews of acupuncture include searches of both English and Chinese databases, there is no information on the value of searching Korean databases. This study aimed to investigate the impact of searching Korean databasesand journals for trials eligible for inclusion in existing Cochrane acupuncture reviews.
The effectiveness of moxibustion for the treatment of functional constipation: a randomized, sham-controlled, patient blinded, pilot clinical trial
Ji-Eun Park, Jae-Uk Sul, Kyungwon Kang, Byung-Cheul Shin, Kwon-Eui Hong, Sun-Mi Choi
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6882-11-124
Abstract: Twenty-six participants (identified with either qi (vital energy) deficiency or qi excess syndrome) were randomly divided into either a moxibustion or sham group. Participants were treated with real or sham moxibustion at 4 acupuncture points, ST23 and ST27, bilaterally, 3 times per week for four weeks. The primary outcome was the frequency of defecations; secondary outcomes were the Bristol stool form scale (BSS) and the constipation assessment scale (CAS).Of the 26 participants that were randomized, 24 completed the study. Defecation frequency, BSS, and CAS showed no difference between the moxibustion and sham groups. The differences were -0.25 (95% CI: -2.08, 1.58, p = 0.78), -1.22 (95% CI: -2.7, 0.26, p = 0.1), 0.91 (95% CI: -1.46, 3.28, p = 0.44) in defecation frequency, BSS, CAS, respectively. The defecation frequency increased from an average of 3.3 to 4.6 times per week in the moxibustion group (1.5[-0.5, 2], p = 0.06) and from 2.7 to 3.7 stools per week in the sham group (1[-1, 2], p = 0.15) after four weeks of treatment. The difference between participants with a deficiency or an excess syndrome, determined based on assessment of sweat, facial features, pain, body energy, and pulse type, was significant in only defecation frequency. The difference was 3.3 (95% CI: 0.41, 6.19, p = 0.03).Moxibustion treatment appears safe, but showed no positive effect on constipation. The effectiveness of moxibustion treatment may depend on the syndrome pattern, and further long-term studies with a larger number of subjects are warranted.Clinical Research Information Service, KCT0000168Constipation is a common gastrointestinal complaint that is experienced by 27.2% of Canadians [1], 12%-19% of Americans [2], and 14% of Asians [3], with a prevalence of 11.6% in the elderly Asian [4]. In Korea, the prevalence is 16.5% for self-reported constipation, 9.2% for functional constipation and 3.9% for constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome [5].Constipation can cause abdom
How Current Clinical Practice Guidelines for Low Back Pain Reflect Traditional Medicine in East Asian Countries: A Systematic Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines and Systematic Reviews
Hyun-Woo Cho, Eui-Hyoung Hwang, Byungmook Lim, Kwang-Ho Heo, Jian-Ping Liu, Kiichiro Tsutani, Myeong Soo Lee, Byung-Cheul Shin
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088027
Abstract: Objectives The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a gap between evidence of traditional medicine (TM) interventions in East-Asian countries from the current Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and evidence from current systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR-MAs) and to analyze the impact of this gap on present CPGs. Methods We examined 5 representative TM interventions in the health care systems of East-Asian countries. We searched seven relevant databases for CPGs to identify whether core CPGs included evidence of TM interventions, and we searched 11 databases for SR-MAs to re-evaluate current evidence on TM interventions. We then compared the gap between the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs. Results Thirteen CPGs and 22 SR-MAs met our inclusion criteria. Of the 13 CPGs, 7 CPGs (54%) mentioned TM interventions, and all were for acupuncture (only one was for both acupuncture and acupressure). However, the CPGs did not recommend acupuncture (or acupressure). Of 22 SR-MAs, 16 were for acupuncture, 5 for manual therapy, 1 for cupping, and none for moxibustion and herbal medicine. Comparing the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs, an underestimation or omission of evidence for acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy in current CPGs was detected. Thus, applying the results from the SR-MAs, we moderately recommend acupuncture for chronic LBP, but we inconclusively recommend acupuncture for (sub)acute LBP due to the limited current evidence. Furthermore, we weakly recommend cupping and manual therapy for both (sub)acute and chronic LBP. We cannot provide recommendations for moxibustion and herbal medicine due to a lack of evidence. Conclusions The current CPGs did not fully reflect the evidence for TM interventions. As relevant studies such as SR-MAs are conducted and evidence increases, the current evidence on acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy should be rigorously considered in the process of developing or updating the CPG system.
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