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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 61 matches for " Briana Dornan "
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Clinical Experience of Auditory Brainstem Response Testing on Pediatric Patients in the Operating Room
Guangwei Zhou,Briana Dornan,Wheaton Hinchion
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/350437
Abstract: Objectives. To review our experience of conducting auditory brainstem response (ABR) test on children in the operating room and discuss the benefits versus limitations of this practice. Methods. Retrospective review study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 267 patients identified with usable data, including ABR results, medical and surgical notes, and follow-up evaluation. Results. Hearing status successfully determined in all patients based on the ABR results form the operating room. The degrees and the types of hearing loss also documented in most of the cases. In addition, multiple factors that may affect the outcomes of ABR in the operating room identified. Conclusions. Hearing loss in children with complicated medical issues can be accurately evaluated via ABR testing in the operating room. Efforts should be made to eliminate adverse factors to ABR recording, and caution should be taken when interpreting ABR results from the operating room.
Clinical Experience of Auditory Brainstem Response Testing on Pediatric Patients in the Operating Room
Guangwei Zhou,Briana Dornan,Wheaton Hinchion
International Journal of Otolaryngology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/350437
Abstract: Objectives. To review our experience of conducting auditory brainstem response (ABR) test on children in the operating room and discuss the benefits versus limitations of this practice. Methods. Retrospective review study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 267 patients identified with usable data, including ABR results, medical and surgical notes, and follow-up evaluation. Results. Hearing status successfully determined in all patients based on the ABR results form the operating room. The degrees and the types of hearing loss also documented in most of the cases. In addition, multiple factors that may affect the outcomes of ABR in the operating room identified. Conclusions. Hearing loss in children with complicated medical issues can be accurately evaluated via ABR testing in the operating room. Efforts should be made to eliminate adverse factors to ABR recording, and caution should be taken when interpreting ABR results from the operating room. 1. Introduction About 2 to 3 of every 1000 children are identified with hearing loss at birth each year in the United States, and hearing impairment is, in fact, the most common sensory deficit in the pediatric population [1–4]. Late-onset hearing loss or acquired hearing loss, in addition to congenital hearing loss, is prevalent as well in young children. For example, hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion (OME) can be seen in 15–40% of children under 5 years [5]. Since hearing impairment in early childhood can cause significant delays in speech/language developments, early identification and diagnosis of hearing loss become the initial and a critical step for proper treatment and habilitation, regardless of the etiology or the severity of the hearing loss. In clinical audiology, behavioral hearing evaluation is considered the “gold standard” for evaluating hearing sensitivity in the pediatric population. During a hearing evaluation, audiologists typically use visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA), conditioned play audiometry (CPA), or conventional pure-tone audiometry to test children’s hearing. The technique chosen by an audiologist for a specific child is usually dependent upon the child’s age and the child’s developmental skill level. Due to developmental and physical limitations, behavioral hearing test such as VRA is not possible for any young children under six months of age. Therefore, an electrophysiology-based hearing evaluation such as the Auditory Brainstem Responses (ABR) test becomes the obvious choice for this population. It can be very difficult, if not
La voix d’A cha dans le roman djebarien Loin De Médine
Briana Belciug
DOCT-US , 2011,
Abstract: The novel Loin de Médine by Assia Djebar does not have to be read or analyzed as a simple historical novel. The author`s purpose is to narrate the birth of Islam and the reconstruction of a Muslim town, Médine, but the strongest and the most sharpened message is that of the creation, the foundation of a society, a civilization that will influence the destinies of many women. To better understand the condition and the roleof the Muslim woman at that time, we will present the special case of an extraordinary woman, very important for Mohammed, but also for the history of Islam: A cha, the beloved of the Prophete and one of the “voices” from the djebarien novel.
Zoulikha Oudai – une he roi ne sans se pulture
Briana Belciug
DOCT-US , 2010,
Abstract: Assia Djebar`s literary work has in its centre the Woman. This article proposes to present the remarkable and unique figure of Zoulikha Ouda , the main character from the novel The Woman without Tomb, an authentic person, a woman which remained in the memory of the Algerian people as the heroine of the Independence War. The author of the novel uses an innovating technique to portray the great personality of Zoulikha, that of the mosaic technique, interweaving, in this way, the voices of the heroine’s daughters and friends
Identification of Issues in Predicting Multi-Robot Performance through Model-Based Simulations  [PDF]
Shameka Dawson, Briana Lowe Wellman, Monica Anderson
Intelligent Control and Automation (ICA) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ica.2011.22016
Abstract: Predicting the performance of intelligent multi-robot systems is advantageous because running physical experiments with teams of robots can be costly and time consuming. Controlling for every factor can be difficult in the presence of minor disparities (i.e. battery charge). Access to a variety of environmental configurations and hardware choices is prohibitive in many cases. With the eminent need for dependable robot controllers and algorithms, it is essential to understand when real robot performance can be accurately predicted. New prediction methods must account for the effects of digital and physical interaction between the robots that are more complex than just collision detection of 2D or physics-based 3D models. In this paper, we identify issues in predicting multi-robot performance and present examples of statistical and model-based simulation methods and their applicability to multi-robot systems. Even when sensor noise, latency and environmental configuration are modeled in some complexity, multi-robot systems interject interference and messaging latency, causing many prediction systems to fail to correlate to absolute or relative performance. We support this supposition by comparing results from 3D physics-based simulations to identical experiments with a physical robot team for a coverage task.
Assia Djebar vue par les Roumains
Briana N?FOREANU
DOCT-US , 2009,
Abstract: Assia Djebar has her place of honor in the francophone literature, being called “The Great Woman of Maghreb”. Her literary work is complex and contains novels (La Soif, La Femme sans sépulture, Les Impatients), short stories (Femmes d’Alger dans leur appartement) and poetry (Poèmes pour une Algérie heureuse). This article is a short study of the translations of Assia Djebar`s literary work in Romania by Alexandru Brumaru and Elena-Brandu a Steiciuc. The paper also explores excerpts from two important novels and presents a comparative analysis between the two Romanian versions.
Brief History of Alternative Dispute Resolution in the United States
Michael McManus,Briana Silverstein
Cadmus , 2011,
Abstract:
Comparing Codimension and Absolute Length in Complex Reflection Groups
Briana Foster-Greenwood
Mathematics , 2012,
Abstract: Reflection length and codimension of fixed point spaces induce partial orders on a complex reflection group. While these partial orders are of independent combinatorial interest, our investigation is motivated by a connection between the codimension order and the algebraic structure of cohomology governing deformations of skew group algebras. In this article, we compare the reflection length and codimension functions and discuss implications for cohomology of skew group algebras. We give algorithms using character theory for computing reflection length, atoms, and poset relations. Using a mixture of theory, explicit examples, and computer calculations in GAP, we show that Coxeter groups and the infinite family G(m,1,n) are the only irreducible complex reflection groups for which the reflection length and codimension orders coincide. We describe the atoms in the codimension order for the infinite family G(m,p,n), which immediately yields an explicit description of generators for cohomology.
Human Carcinogenesis: Toward a Unified Theory  [PDF]
Briana Marshall, Doug Dix
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1103707
Abstract:
If either chance or environmental exposure was the dominant carcinogen, cancer risk would increase continuously with age, but it doesn’t. For all cancers studied, risk exhibits three phases: 1) Low risk at young ages, followed by 2) an increase in risk to a maximum at some later age, followed by 3) a plateau or decline in risk at advanced ages. Only a genetically-determined discontinuous process can explain this pattern. We analyzed differences in risk between tissues of tumor origin and between geographic locations, genders, races, and ethnicities for clues. Our analyses suggest that normal tissue differentiation is safe, but inadequate. At some critical age, regeneration or dedifferentiation is required and this is an invitation to carcinogenesis. Upon reaching this critical age, risk varies with the size of a target, which may correspond to the number of regenerating or dedifferentiating stem cells. Cancer incidence rates were analyzed for melanoma and cancers of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, liver, pancreas, larynx, bronchus, breast, and kidney in populations distributed worldwide and within the United States in two time eras. Over all cancers, in all populations, and both eras, the difference in age-specific rates between ages 50 and 40, d50-40, correlated strongly with age-standardized rates. Differences in d50-40 correlated strongly with differences in age-standardized rates between genders, races, and ethnicities. We suggest that, for the cancers studied, the critical age occurs between 40 and 50. If environmental exposure or segregating genes was the dominant carcinogen, the rank order of cancer risk between tissues of tumor origin would vary from one geographic location to another, because environment and segregating genes vary between geographic locations. Such variation was observed between rank order in Japan and rank order in other countries, but not between rank orders in the other countries. We suspect, therefore, that environment or segregating genes play an important role in determining the difference in rank order of risk for the tissues of tumor origin between Japan and other countries. If chance or environmental exposure was the dominant carcinogen, cancer risk would correlate strongly between pairs of cancers across populations, but it doesn’t. Coefficients of risk between pairs of cancers are, typically, moderate at best. Only mouth, larynx, bronchus, and kidney show strong coefficients. By our measures, cancer risk from aging exceeds cancer risk from other-than-aging causes in all populations in both eras. We suspect that the aging risk is determined by genes that are common to all members of our species, and we suggest that inhibiting tissue injury and unnecessary growth will reduce cancer risk.
Children’s Savings Account Programs Enable Parents to Plan and Talk about College with Children and others  [PDF]
William Elliott, Briana Starks, Kristen Seefeldt, James Ellis
Sociology Mind (SM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/sm.2018.84022
Abstract: The researchers adopted a positivist approach to qualitative research, hypothesizing that the interviews would reveal positive parental expectations and development of college-saver identity among Harold Alfond College Challenge (HACC) participants. HACC is an opt-out children’s savings account asset intervention that begins at birth for children born in Maine. For this study, data were obtained through structured interviews of 22 families. Most parents in HACC describe having positive educational expectations and having developed a college-saver identity. More research is needed.
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