oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 116 )

2019 ( 727 )

2018 ( 821 )

2017 ( 755 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 462790 matches for " Brett A. Braly "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /462790
Display every page Item
Operative Treatment of Cervical Myelopathy: Cervical Laminoplasty
Brett A. Braly,David Lunardini,Chris Cornett,William F. Donaldson
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/508534
Abstract: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a degenerative process which may result in clinical signs and symptoms which require surgical intervention. Many treatment options have been proposed with various degrees of technical difficulty and technique sensitive benefits. We review laminoplasty as a motion-sparing posterior decompressive method. Current literature supports the use of laminoplasty for indicated decompression. We also decribe our surgical technique for an open-door, or “hinged”, laminoplasty.
Operative Treatment of Cervical Myelopathy: Cervical Laminoplasty
Brett A. Braly,David Lunardini,Chris Cornett,William F. Donaldson
Advances in Orthopedics , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/508534
Abstract: Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a degenerative process which may result in clinical signs and symptoms which require surgical intervention. Many treatment options have been proposed with various degrees of technical difficulty and technique sensitive benefits. We review laminoplasty as a motion-sparing posterior decompressive method. Current literature supports the use of laminoplasty for indicated decompression. We also decribe our surgical technique for an open-door, or “hinged”, laminoplasty. 1. Introduction Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the natural result of degenerative compression on the cervical spinal cord. The result may be a progressive and stepwise deterioration of neurological function in patients. The chronic debilitating nature of this process justifies surgical decompression. Posterior decompression has been described as a treatment for CSM since the 1940s. Laminectomy was the initial surgical option used. The decompression was performed by rongeurs. However, the insertion of the rongeur in an already limited space available for the cord led often to a decrease in neurological function postoperatively [1–3]. Even with modern approaches to laminectomy using high speed burs, development of postoperative instability has led surgeons to explore more efficacious ways of decompression. In 1977, Hirabayashi and Satomi published their results on multisegment decompression by means of an open-door laminoplasty [4]. This technique allows for adequate posterior decompression of the spinal cord while retaining the posterior elements. This avoids the postoperative instability seen with laminectomy as well as the stiffness and risks of posterior cervical fusion. Additionally, motion is spared due to the absence of a fusion. There have since been multiple techniques for performing a cervical laminoplasty described with supporting literature [4–8]. These techniques include the expansive “open door,” a midline “French Door,” En Bloc resection, spinous process splitting, and Z-Plasty [4, 9]. Outcome studies have supported laminoplasty as a valid treatment for CSM however, no definitive literature shows its superiority to laminectomy in conjunction with a posterior cervical fusion. All surgical strategies appear to be equal in yielding neurologic outcomes, though differences are found in complication reports. Patient selection is crucial prior to proceeding with cervical laminoplasty. Special attention must be paid to sagittal alignment for optimal outcomes. Laminoplasty is ideal for multilevel stenosis (AP canal diameter < 13?mm) due to
Global Asymptotic Behavior of
Brett A,Kulenovi? MRS
Advances in Difference Equations , 2007,
Abstract: We investigate the global stability character of the equilibrium points and the period-two solutions of , with positive parameters and nonnegative initial conditions. We show that every solution of the equation in the title converges to either the zero equilibrium, the positive equilibrium, or the period-two solution, for all values of parameters outside of a specific set defined in the paper. In the case when the equilibrium points and period-two solution coexist, we give a precise description of the basins of attraction of all points. Our results give an affirmative answer to Conjecture 9.5.6 and the complete answer to Open Problem 9.5.7 of Kulenovi and Ladas, 2002.
Merkel Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Challenges in Diagnosis and Therapy
Brett A. Miles
Journal of Skin Cancer , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/427984
Abstract:
Effect of Skin Pigmentation on Near Infrared Spectroscopy  [PDF]
Luke Couch, Mellisa Roskosky, Brett A. Freedman, Michael S. Shuler
American Journal of Analytical Chemistry (AJAC) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ajac.2015.612086
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of skin pigmentation regarding Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) tissue oxygen saturation values (StO2). The study examined NIRS values in individuals with varying skin pigmentation on the anterior compartment of the lower leg and volar forearm to determine if correlation exists among three NIRS devices, the EQUANOX, Casmed, and INVOS. Skin pigmentation was measured on the anterior lower leg (AL) and volar forearm (VF) of participants using a noninvasive colorimeter that employed reflective spectroscopy to produce a quantitative value for erythema (skin “redness”) and melanin (skin pigment). Muscle oxygenation was measured using three oximetry devices with sensors placed in the same areas. The EQUANOX device showed no significant correlation with skin pigmentation, while the Casmed and INVOS devices showed moderate and significant correlation with skin pigmentation, respectively. Different devices have different abilities to remove confounding variables, such as skin pigmentation and erythema, which may affect clinical decision-making, and affect the use of NIRS technology.
Current and Emerging Detoxification Therapies for Critical Care
Brett A. Howell,Anuj Chauhan
Materials , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ma3042483
Abstract: Toxicity resulting from prescription drugs such as tricyclic antidepressants and cardioactive steroids, as well as drugs of abuse and exposure to environmental chemicals, represents a major need for detoxification treatments. Particles and colloids, antibody fragments (Fab), and indirect treatment methods such as macroemulsions, are currently being developed or employed as detoxification therapies. Colloids, particles, and protein fragments typically mitigate toxicity by binding to the toxin and reducing its concentration in vital organs. Indirect methods such as macroemulsions and sodium bicarbonate act directly on the affected organs, rather than the toxin. In this review, key design parameters ( i.e. binding affinity, biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics) are discussed for each type of detoxification treatment. In addition, some of the latest research in each area is reviewed.
Statistical characterization of the GxxxG glycine repeats in the flagellar biosynthesis protein FliH and its Type III secretion homologue YscL
Brett Trost, Stanley A Moore
BMC Microbiology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2180-9-72
Abstract: A set of FliH and YscL protein sequences was downloaded from GenBank, and then filtered to reduce redundancy, to ensure the soundness of the sequences, and to eliminate, as much as possible, confounding phylogenetic signal between individual sequences by implementing a pairwise 25% sequence identity cut-off. The general features of the glycine-rich repeats in these proteins were examined, and it was found that the length of these repeat segments varied substantially among FliH proteins but was fairly consistent for the Type III (YscL) homologue sequences, with values of m ranging from 0 to 12 for FliH and 0 to 2 for YscL. The amino acid sequence distribution of each of the three positions in the GxxxG repeats was found to differ significantly from the overall amino acid composition of the FliH/YscL proteins. The high frequency of Glu, Gln, Lys and Ala residues in the repeat positions, which is not likely indicative of any contaminating phylogenetic signal, suggests an α-helical structure for this motif. In addition, we sought to determine whether certain pairs of amino acids, in certain pairs of positions, were found together significantly more often than would be predicted by chance. Several statistically significant correlations were uncovered, which may be important for maintaining helical stability or for forming helix-helix interactions. These correlations are likely not of a phylogenetic origin as the originating sequences for the pair correlations are derived from a low similarity set and the individual incidences of the pair correlations do not cluster in any obvious phylogenetic sense, nor is there much evidence of strict sequence conservation outside the positions of the glycine residues. Finally, the α-helices from a non-redundant set of proteins from the Protein Data Bank were searched for GxxxG repeats similar in length to those found in FliH, however there were no helices containing more than three contiguous glycine repeat segments; thus, long glycine
Infliximab-Induced Hypothyroidism: A Novel Case and Postulations concerning the Mechanism
Brett Cerniglia,Marc A. Judson
Case Reports in Medicine , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/216939
Abstract: We report a patient with cutaneous sarcoidosis who developed hypothyroidism following 17 months of infliximab therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of hypothyroidism following infliximab administration. While it is possible that the patient’s hypothyroidism was unrelated to the use of infliximab, the time course and lack of alternative explanations make such an association plausible. We postulate that hypothyroidism in this patient may have been related to the development of autoantibodies to infliximab that triggered the development of an autoimmune thyroiditis. Regardless of the mechanism, we would encourage clinicians to keep the potential mechanisms of TNF- in mind when treating patients with TNF- antagonist medications. 1. Introduction Infliximab is a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- ) inhibitor that has been shown to have efficacy for sarcoidosis [1–3]. Potential adverse responses to infliximab include the production of anti-infliximab antibodies [4] and autoantibodies [5] and even the induction of autoimmune diseases [6]. With the established presence of TSH regulated TNF- receptors in human thyroid tissue [7], it is plausible that these adverse immune responses may affect thyroid function. We report a patient with cutaneous sarcoidosis who developed hypothyroidism of unknown cause following continued administration of infliximab. 2. Case Report A 47-year-old white man with biopsy-confirmed sarcoidosis of the nasal sinuses was referred for skin lesions consistent with lupus pernio (disfiguring facial sarcoidosis). The lesions had worsened over the previous five years and were associated with significant nasal congestion. The lesions were initially treated with a six-month course of oral corticosteroids; however, the patient discontinued corticosteroids because of concern for potential side effects. Additionally, the lesions failed to improve with several months of mycophenolate therapy, 500?mg twice daily. His physical examination at presentation was remarkable for indurated violaceous to erythematous lupus pernio lesions on his nose. The patient was treated with infliximab infusions 5?mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and then every 6 weeks for his lupus pernio lesions. By the third infusion, he noticed a remarkable regression in both the lesions and associated nasal congestion. The frequency of his infliximab infusions was lengthened to once every eight weeks and his skin lesions completely resolved. Seventeen months after initiating infliximab therapy, the patient developed muscle cramping, cold intolerance, a deeper voice,
A Linear Technique to Understand Non-Normal Turbulence Applied to a Magnetized Plasma
Brett Friedman,Troy A. Carter
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.025003
Abstract: In nonlinear dynamical systems with highly nonorthogonal linear eigenvectors, linear non-modal analysis is more useful than normal mode analysis in predicting turbulent properties. However, the non-trivial time evolution of non-modal structures makes quantitative understanding and prediction difficult. We present a technique to overcome this difficulty by modeling the effect that the advective nonlinearities have on spatial turbulent structures. The nonlinearities are taken as a periodic randomizing force with time scale consistent with critical balance arguments. We apply this technique to a model of drift wave turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman \emph{et al.}, Rev. Sci. Inst. {\bf 62}, 2875 (1991)], where non-modal effects dominate the turbulence. We compare the resulting growth rate spectra to that obtained from a nonlinear simulation, showing good qualitative agreement, especially in comparison to the eigenmode growth rate spectra.
Professionalism education of OB/GYN resident physicians: What makes a difference?  [PDF]
Brett Worly
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2013.31A026
Abstract:

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new Professionalism curriculum in an Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN) residency after introducing Narrative Medicine and Professional Development/Support Group (PDSG) programs. Methods: 32 OB/GYN residents participated in this IRB approved pilot study. Twenty residents were assessed with the Barry Challenges to Professionalism Questionnaire (Barry), the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Physician Version (JSE), and the Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration (JSAT) in August 2010, as controls. Five Narrative Medicine sessions and four PDSG sessions were then used from August 2010-May 2011, for resident physician professionalism education. Seventeen residents then underwent post-testing with the Barry, JSE, and JSAT in May 2011. Results: The pre-test/post-test Barry comparison showed an improvement in scores after introduction of the new Narrative Medicine and PDSG curriculum (7.6 +/- 2.1 versus 8.4 +/- 1.6; p = 0.10) though this was not statistically significant. Pre-test/post-test comparison of JSAT scores showed a statistically significant decline in collaboration (52.3 +/- 4.1 versus 49.7 +/- 3.7; p = 0.028) while JSE scores showed a downward trend in empathy (109.3 +/- 10.0 versus 104.8 +/- 9.2; p = 0.086). Conclusion: Narrative Medicine and PDSG small group sessions could be an effective component of OB/GYN resident physician Professionalism curriculum. This pilot project was underpowered, due to limited resources.

Page 1 /462790
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.