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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1198 matches for " Brandon Goodwin "
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Surgical Flap and Graft Reconstruction Workshop for Dermatology Residents  [PDF]
Brandon Goodwin, Richard Wagner
Journal of Cosmetics, Dermatological Sciences and Applications (JCDSA) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jcdsa.2015.52011
Abstract: Background: Traditional models for teaching surgical principles focus primarily on the apprenticeship theory; however there has been a trend in surgical education to certifying competency in a simulation environment prior to working with patients. Many surgical models emphasize learning the technical and manual dexterity skills necessary to be a surgeon, yet few focus on obtaining the theoretical and abstract skills needed for planning complex cutaneous surgical repairs with flaps and grafts. We developed and evaluated a novel surgical flaps and grafts workshop for residents through the Department of Dermatology. Methods: Participants received a 60 minute PowerPoint lecture focusing on the basic principles of cutaneous repair with flaps and grafts, with examples and explanation of each of the four main types of flaps and grafts. The participants then received nine photocopies of Mohs micrographic surgery defects with instructions to design three repairs, focusing on functional and aesthetic outcome. Hypothetical and actual repair designs were then discussed in an open forum format. Anonymous surveys administered to 11 dermatology residents assessed their knowledge level, confidence level, and likelihood of using flaps and grafts pre- and post-workshop using Likert scales. Overall experience was also assessed. A paired sample Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used for analysis, since the data was non-parametrically distributed. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in confidence performing flaps post workshop (p = 0.0469). There was also an increase in knowledge of flaps and grafts, confidence in planning flaps and grafts, and confidence in performing grafts post workshop, but these findings did not reach statistical significance. The workshop had no effect on expected future use of flaps and grafts. Conclusions: The surgical workshop is a novel simulation teaching tool for learning basic principles and design of flaps and grafts in cutaneous surgery.
Insulin resistance in breast cancer: relevance and clinical implications
PJ Goodwin
Breast Cancer Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/bcr3006
Abstract:
Emergence of a continent from "Racial" Dismemberment, Anthropology's responsibility toward Africa.
Stefan Goodwin
African Anthropologist , 1999,
Abstract:
Diagnostic delays and referral management schemes: how ‘integrated’ primary care might damage your health
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2008,
Abstract:
Managing and leading in inter-agency settings (Better partnership working series)
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2008,
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Creating an integrated public sector? Labour's plans for the modernisation of the English health care system
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2002,
Abstract: The current Labour Government has embarked on radical public sector reform in England. A so-called ‘Modernisation Agenda’ has been developed that is encapsulated in the NHS Plan—a document that details a long-term vision for health care. This plan involves a five-fold strategy: investment through greater public funding; quality assurance; improving access; service integration and inter-professional working; and providing a public health focus. The principles of Labour's vision have been broadly supported. However, achieving its aims appears reliant on two key factors. First, appropriate resources are required to create capacity, particularly management capacity, to enable new functions to develop. Second, promoting access and service integration requires the development of significant co-ordination, collaboration and networking between agencies and individuals. This is particularly important for health and social care professionals. Their historically separate professions suggest that a significant period of change management is required to allow new roles and partnerships to evolve. In an attempt to secure delivery of its goals, however, the Government has placed the emphasis on further organisational restructuring. In doing so, the Government may have missed the key challenges faced in delivering its NHS Plan. As this paper argues, cultural and behavioural change is probably a far more appropriate and important requirement for success than a centrally directed approach that emphasises the rearrangement of structural furniture.
Integrating spirituality in health and social care: perspectives and practical approaches
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2006,
Abstract:
The long term importance of English primary care groups for integration in primary health care and deinstitutionalisation of hospital care
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2001,
Abstract: Purpose: This article reviews the impact of successive experiments in the development of primary care organisations in England and assesses the long-term importance of English primary care groups for the integration of health and community and health and social care and the deinstitutionalisation of hospital care. Theory: Governments in a number of Western countries are attempting to improve the efficiency, appropriateness and equity of their health systems. One of the main ways of doing this is to devolve provision and commissioning responsibility from national and regional organisations to more local agencies based in primary care. Such primary care organisations are allocated budgets that span both primary and secondary (hospital) services and also, potentially, social care. Method: This article is based on a systematic review of the literature forthcoming from the UK Government's Department of Health-funded evaluations of successive primary care organisational developments. These include total purchasing pilots, GP commissioning group pilots, personal medical services pilots and primary care groups and trusts. Results: Primary care organisations in England have proved to be a catalyst in facilitating the development of integrated care working between primary and community health services. Conversely, primary care organisations have proved less effective in promoting integration between health and social care agencies where most progress has been made at the strategic commissioning level. The development of primary care trusts in England is heralding an end to traditional community hospitals. Conclusions: The development of primary care groups in England are but an intermediate step of a policy progression towards future primary care-based organisations that will functionally integrate primary and community health services with local authority services under a single management umbrella.
Fatal attraction? The rise of disease management programmes in Europe
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2007,
Abstract:
Integrated health care delivery
Nick Goodwin
International Journal of Integrated Care , 2011,
Abstract:
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