oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 11 )

2019 ( 117 )

2018 ( 730 )

2017 ( 608 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 45101 matches for " Bian WU "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /45101
Display every page Item
A QoS-aware Method for Web Services Discovery  [PDF]
Bian WU, Xincai WU
Journal of Geographic Information System (JGIS) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/jgis.2010.21008
Abstract: The non-functional QoS (quality of service) information helps us to select a proper Web-service from the web applications, by using component services such as UDDI[1](Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration) and MDS(Monitoring and Discovery System). MDS is a suite of web services to monitor and discover resources and service on Grids, but MDS only based on function aspects. This paper studies on an approach to provide the QoS information and a discovery model by using MDS and gives a system deployment and implementation plan. The simulation results show that the method is effective in service discovery.
Integrating problem solving and knowledge construction through dual mapping
Bian Wu,Minhong Wang
Knowledge Management & E-Learning : an International Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Learning through problem solving has been regarded as an important approach to constructivist learning. However, how practice and knowledge reciprocate each other has not been sufficiently examined and remains implicit. Although problem-based learning is increasingly used in medical education and other domains, there is a concern about its weakness in general study design in relation to its impact on learners’ knowledge base. Considering the complex cognitive processes involved in learning through problem solving, this study proposes a dual mapping learning environment, serving as a visual affordance for improving problem solving and underlying knowledge construction processes as well as the transformation between the two.
Solvent Extraction of Lanthanum Ion from Chloride Medium by Di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid with a Complexing Method  [PDF]
Shaohua Yin, Wenyuan Wu, Xue Bian, Yao Luo, Fengyun Zhang
International Journal of Nonferrous Metallurgy (IJNM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ijnm.2013.22010
Abstract:

Solvent extraction experiments of La(III) with di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (P204) from chloride solution in the presence of a complexing agent (lactic acid) have been performed. The effective separation factors can be achieved when the complexing agent is added to the aqueous phase of the extraction system. The complexing agent lactic acid can be effectively recycled using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as extractant, by the use of a countercurrent extraction process, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) value in the raffinate is 57.7 mg/L, which meets the emission standards of pollutants from rare earths industry. Thus, the simple and environment-friendly complexing method has been proved to be an effective strategy for separating light rare earths, and provides a positive influence on the purification of La(III).

Correlation Study on Undergraduates’ Internet Altruistic Behavior, Self-Concept and Inter-Personal Relation  [PDF]
Huiying Liu, Xueke Huang, Bian Du, Pan Wu
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2014.44016
Abstract:

Purposes: To study the relation among self-concept, inter-personal relation and internet altruistic behavior. Methods: Adopt internet altruistic behavior scale, TSCS, inter-personal relation scale to test177 in-school undergraduates. Results: Difference of total score of internet altruistic behavior and its factor scores in students of different genders, grades and only child and child with siblings is not significant (p > .05). There are differences in major among dimensions of internet sharing and internet guidance (p < .05); and the scores of art students are higher than those of engineering students; psychological self has a significant correlation with internet supporting; social self has a significant correlation with total scores of internet altruistic behavior, internet supporting and internet reminding, but the total scores of self-concept have no significant correlation with the total scores of internet altruistic behavior and its factor scores. Internet altruistic behavior has a significant correlation with inter-personal relation.

Comparison of Learning Software Architecture by Developing Social Applications versus Games on the Android Platform
Bian Wu,Alf Inge Wang
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/494232
Abstract: This paper describes an empirical study where the focus was on discovering differences and similarities in students working on development of social applications versus students working on development of games using the same Android development platform. In 2010-2011, students attending the software architecture course at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) could choose between four types of projects. Independently of the chosen type of project, all students had to go through the same phases, produce the same documents based on the same templates, and follow exactly the same process. This study focuses on one of projects—Android project, to see how much the application domain affects the course project independently of the chosen technology. Our results revealed some positive effects for the students doing game development compared to social application development to learn software architecture, like motivated to work with games, a better focus on quality attributes such as modifiability and testability during the development, production of software architectures of higher complexity, and more productive coding working for the project. However, we did not find significant differences in awarded grade between students choosing the two different domains. 1. Introduction Computer games and video games have become very popular for children and youths and play a prominent role in the culture of young people [1]. Games can now be played everywhere in technology-rich environments equipped with laptops, smart phones, game consoles (mobile and stationary), set-top boxes, and other digital devices. From this phenomenon, it is believed that the intrinsic motivation that young people show towards games could be combined with educational content and objectives into what Prensky calls “digital game based learning” [2]. Besides an abundant appearance of games in young students life, game development technology has matured and become more advanced [3]. Based on various existing game development environments, the whole duty of game development process can be divided into several expert domains and roles such as game programmer, 3D model creator, game designer, musician, animator, and play writer, and so forth. The process of integrating game content with technology can be simplified through the usage of game engines and available information on the web from various user and expert communities. For instance, Microsoft’s XNA game development kit provides the game loop function to draw and update the game contents, and it also provides convenient
An Application of a Game Development Framework in Higher Education
Alf Inge Wang,Bian Wu
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2009, DOI: 10.1155/2009/693267
Abstract: This paper describes how a game development framework was used as a learning aid in a software engineering. Games can be used within higher education in various ways to promote student participation, enable variation in how lectures are taught, and improve student interest. In this paper, we describe a case study at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) where a game development framework was applied to make students learn software architecture by developing a computer game. We provide a model for how game development frameworks can be integrated with a software engineering or computer science course. We describe important requirements to consider when choosing a game development framework for a course and an evaluation of four frameworks based on these requirements. Further, we describe some extensions we made to the existing game development framework to let the students focus more on software architectural issues than the technical implementation issues. Finally, we describe a case study of how a game development framework was integrated in a software architecture course and the experiences from doing so.
Using Game Development to Teach Software Architecture
Alf Inge Wang,Bian Wu
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/920873
Abstract: This paper describes a case study of how a game project using the XNA Game Studio from Microsoft was implemented in a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain of the software architecture project has been a robot controller for navigating a maze. Robot controller was chosen as the domain for the project, as there exist several papers and descriptions on reference architectures for managing mobile robots. This paper describes the changes we had to make to introduce an XNA game development project to the software architecture course, and our experiences from running a software architecture project focusing on game development and XNA. The experiences described in this paper are based on feedback from the course staff, the project reports of the students, and a mandatory course evaluation. The evaluation shows among other things that the majority of the students preferred the game project to the robot project, that XNA was considered to be suitable platform for a software architecture project, that the students found it useful to learn XNA and C#, and that some students were carried away when developing the game in the software architecture project. 1. Introduction Games have been used in education for many years mainly focusing on teaching children in an interesting and motivating way. Research shows that integrating games within children’s classroom can be beneficial for academic achievement, motivation, and classroom dynamics [1]. Teaching methods based on educational games are not only attractive to schoolchildren, but can also be beneficial for university students [2]. Research on game concepts and game development used in higher education is not unique, for example [3–5], but we believe there is an untapped potential that needs to be explored. By introducing games in higher education lecturers can access teaching aids that promote active students, provide alternative teaching methods to improve variation, enable social learning through multiplayer learning games, and motivate students to work harder on projects and exercises. Games can mainly be integrated in higher education in three ways. First, traditional exercises can be replaced by games motivating the students to put extra effort in doing the exercises, and giving the course staff an opportunity to monitor how the students work with the exercises in real-time [6, 7].
A Guideline for Game Development-Based Learning: A Literature Review
Bian Wu,Alf Inge Wang
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/103710
Abstract:
A Guideline for Game Development-Based Learning: A Literature Review
Bian Wu,Alf Inge Wang
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/103710
Abstract: This study aims at reviewing the published scientific literature on the topics of a game development-based learning (GDBL) method using game development frameworks (GDFs) with the perspective of (a) summarizing a guideline for using GDBL in a curriculum, (b) identifying relevant features of GDFs, and (c) presenting a synthesis of impact factors with empirical evidence on the educational effectiveness of the GDBL method. After systematically going through the available literature on the topic, 34 relevant articles were selected for the final study. We analyzed the articles from three perspectives: (1) pedagogical context and teaching process, (2) selection of GDFs, and (3) evaluation of the GDBL method. The findings from the 34 articles suggest that GDFs have many potential benefits as an aid to teach computer science, software engineering, art design, and other fields and that such GDFs combined with the motivation from games can improve the students’ knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors in contrast to the traditional classroom teaching. Furthermore, based on the results of the literature review, we extract a guideline of how to apply the GDBL method in education. The empirical evidence of current findings gives a positive overall picture and can provide a useful reference to educators, practitioners, and researchers in the area of game-based learning. 1. Introduction Computer games and video games have become very popular in children and adolescents’ life and play a prominent role in the culture of young people [1]. Games can now be played everywhere in technology-rich environments equipped with laptops, smart phones, game consoles (mobile and stationary), set-top, boxes and other digital devices. From this phenomenon, it is believed that the intrinsic motivation that young people shows towards games can be combined with educational content and objectives into what Prensky calls “digital game based learning” [2]. Besides of an abundant appearance of games in young students life, game development technology has matured and became more advanced than before [3]. Based on various existing game development software, the whole duty of game development process can be divided into several domains and roles such as game programmers, 3D model creators, game designers, musicians, animators, and play writers. Under this situation, some web resources and game engines can simplify the game development process. For instance, Microsoft’s XNA game development kit provides the game loop function to draw and update the game contents, and it also provides
Composition dependence of viscosity for Al(1 x)Mgx(0 x 0.10) alloys
YuQing Wang,YuQin Wu,XiuFang Bian
Chinese Science Bulletin , 2007, DOI: 10.1007/s11434-007-0214-0
Abstract: Viscosities of molten Al(1 x)Mgx (0 x 0.10) alloys have been measured in the temperature range of 973 K-1173 K by a torsional oscillation cup method. The viscosity dependence on temperature for Al(1 x)Mgx (0 x 0.10) melts obeys Arrhenius equation. The viscosity increases with increasing magnesium concentration in the investigated system. There is an important relationship between viscosity and its glass-forming ability for metallic melt.
Page 1 /45101
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.