oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 2 )

2019 ( 212 )

2018 ( 368 )

2017 ( 380 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 209026 matches for " Berry L "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /209026
Display every page Item
Protec ting South Africa’s children: what difference will the new Children’s Bill make?
L Berry
Continuing Medical Education , 2007,
Abstract: No s.
Modeling regional sea level rise using local tide gauge data
H. Baki Iz, L. Berry, M. Koch
Journal of Geodetic Science , 2012, DOI: 10.2478/v10156-011-0039-2
Abstract: Currently regional mean sea level trends and variations are inferred from the analysis of several individual local tide gauge data that span only a long period of time at a given region. In this study, we propose using a model to merge various tide gauge data, regardless of their time span, in a single solution, to estimate parameters representative of regional mean sea level trends. The proposed model can account for the geographical correlations among the local tide gauge stations as well as serial correlations, if needed, for individual stations' data. Such a vigorous regional solution enables statistically optimal uncertainties for estimated and projected trends. The proposed formulation also unifies all the local reference levels by modeling their offsets from a predefined station's reference level. To test its effectiveness, the proposed model was used to investigate the regional mean sea level variations for the coastal areas of the Florida Panhandle using 26 local tide gauge stations that span approximately 830 years of monthly averages from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level repository. The new estimate for the regional trend is 2.14 mm/yr with a ±0.03 mm/yr standard error, which is an order of magnitude improvement over the most recent mean sea level trend estimates and projections for the Florida region obtained from simple averages of local solutions.
Patient–provider communication data: linking process and outcomes in oncology care
Kennedy Sheldon L, Hong F, Berry DL
Cancer Management and Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S26189
Abstract: tient–provider communication data: linking process and outcomes in oncology care Methodology (2634) Total Article Views Authors: Kennedy Sheldon L, Hong F, Berry DL Published Date November 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 311 - 317 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S26189 Lisa Kennedy Sheldon1,2, Fangxin Hong3,4, Donna Berry4,5 1University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, USA; 2St Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, USA; 3Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA, USA; 4Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Phyllis F Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Boston, MA, USA; 5Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Overview: Patient–provider communication is vital to quality patient care in oncology settings and impacts health outcomes. Newer communication datasets contain patient symptom reports, real-time audiofiles of visits, coded communication data, and visit outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to: (1) review the complex communication processes during patient–provider interaction during oncology care; (2) describe methods of gathering and coding communication data; (3) suggest logical approaches to analyses; and (4) describe one new dataset that allows linking of patient symptoms and communication processes with visit outcomes. Challenges: Patient–provider communication research is complex due to numerous issues, including human subjects’ concerns, methods of data collection, numerous coding schemes, and varying analytic techniques. Data collection and coding: Coding of communication data is determined by the research question(s) and variables of interest. Subsequent coding and timestamping the behaviors provides categorical data and determines the interval between and patterns of behaviors. Analytic approaches: Sequential analyses move from descriptive statistics to explanatory analyses to direct analyses and conditional probabilities. In the final stage, explanatory modeling is used to predict outcomes from communication elements. Examples of patient and provider communication in the ambulatory oncology setting are provided from the new Electronic Self Report Assessment-Cancer II dataset. Summary: More complex communication data sets provide opportunities to link elements of patient–provider communication with visit outcomes. Given more complex datasets, a step-wise approach is necessary to analyze and identify predictive variables. Sequential analyses move from descriptive results to predictive models with communication data, creating links between patient symptoms and concerns, real-time audiotaped communication, and visit outcomes. The results of these analyses will be useful in developing evidence-based interventions to enhance communication and improve psychosocial outcomes in oncology settings.
Social capital and mental health among mothers in Vietnam who have children with disabilities
Nguyen Thi Minh Thuy,Helen L. Berry
Global Health Action , 2013, DOI: 10.3402/gha.v6i0.18886
Abstract: Background: Having a child with a disability is a heavy burden for mothers, especially in developing countries, where there is little available financial or other government support. Having a child with a disability is also linked to mental health problems and poor quality of life. Communities rich in social capital and individuals who have high levels of personal social capital generally enjoy day-to-day and long-term health and social benefits but this has not been investigated in Vietnam among mothers of children with disabilities. This study aims to investigate these mothers’ distress in terms of their social capital. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on an interviewer-assisted survey included 172 mothers of children with moderate/severe disabilities in two provinces of Vietnam (one in the North and one in central Vietnam), using a newly translated and modified version of the Australian community participation questionnaire, several measures of personal social cohesion, and Kessler's 10-item measure of general psychological distress. Hierarchical linear regression modelling was used to explore the relationships among socio-demographic factors, multiple components of structural and cognitive social capita, and mothers’ distress controlling for a wide range of socio-demographic characteristics, the nature of the child's disability, and mothers’ personality (extroversion). Results: Mothers in this study were highly and multiply disadvantaged, and they had very high levels of distress and low levels of community participation. Furthermore, most forms of participation were associated with greater, not less, distress. Socio-demographic characteristics, child's disability, and mothers’ personality did little to explain variance in mothers’ distress, but types and amounts of participation were important predictors. The final regression model explained 29% of variance in distress, with major contributions made by living in a mountainous area, having a ‘reserved’ personality, and frequency and types of participation. Conclusion: Vietnamese mothers whose children have disabilities are extremely marginalised and distressed. They have only modest social capital, but the little they have tends to be related to better mental health. Being from the mountains; being ‘reserved’; spending time with friends, neighbours, and in educational activities; and trusting others are related to better mental health among these women. However, several types of participation are associated with worse mental health. Such activities should be avoided in any interventions design
Management of post cholecystectomy Mirizzi′s syndrome
Janes Simon,Berry L,Dijkstra B
Journal of Minimal Access Surgery , 2005,
Abstract: Various strategies have been proposed for the management of retained calculi within the biliary tree following cholecystectomy. We present a unique case of a cystic duct remnant calculus causing Mirizzi syndrome, only the fourth such case of its kind. An open procedure was planned, however the calculus was eventually extracted endoscopically. The pathophysiology and management of Mirizzi syndrome and retained calculi within the cystic duct remnant are discussed along with the merits of a minimally invasive approach.
Patient–provider communication data: linking process and outcomes in oncology care
Kennedy Sheldon L,Hong F,Berry DL
Cancer Management and Research , 2011,
Abstract: Lisa Kennedy Sheldon1,2, Fangxin Hong3,4, Donna Berry4,51University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, USA; 2St Joseph Hospital, Nashua, NH, USA; 3Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Boston, MA, USA; 4Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Phyllis F Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Boston, MA, USA; 5Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAOverview: Patient–provider communication is vital to quality patient care in oncology settings and impacts health outcomes. Newer communication datasets contain patient symptom reports, real-time audiofiles of visits, coded communication data, and visit outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to: (1) review the complex communication processes during patient–provider interaction during oncology care; (2) describe methods of gathering and coding communication data; (3) suggest logical approaches to analyses; and (4) describe one new dataset that allows linking of patient symptoms and communication processes with visit outcomes.Challenges: Patient–provider communication research is complex due to numerous issues, including human subjects’ concerns, methods of data collection, numerous coding schemes, and varying analytic techniques.Data collection and coding: Coding of communication data is determined by the research question(s) and variables of interest. Subsequent coding and timestamping the behaviors provides categorical data and determines the interval between and patterns of behaviors.Analytic approaches: Sequential analyses move from descriptive statistics to explanatory analyses to direct analyses and conditional probabilities. In the final stage, explanatory modeling is used to predict outcomes from communication elements. Examples of patient and provider communication in the ambulatory oncology setting are provided from the new Electronic Self Report Assessment-Cancer II dataset.Summary: More complex communication data sets provide opportunities to link elements of patient–provider communication with visit outcomes. Given more complex datasets, a step-wise approach is necessary to analyze and identify predictive variables. Sequential analyses move from descriptive results to predictive models with communication data, creating links between patient symptoms and concerns, real-time audiotaped communication, and visit outcomes. The results of these analyses will be useful in developing evidence-based interventions to enhance communication and improve psychosocial outcomes in oncology settings.Keywords: communication, analysis, distress, cancer,
Extreme-mass-ratio-bursts from extragalactic sources
C. P. L. Berry,J. R. Gair
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stt990
Abstract: Extreme-mass-ratio bursts (EMRBs) are a class of potentially interesting gravitational wave signals. They are produced when a compact object passes through periapsis on a highly eccentric orbit about a much more massive object; we consider stellar mass objects orbiting the massive black holes (MBHs) found in galactic centres. Such a system may emit many EMRBs before eventually completing the inspiral. There are several nearby galaxies that could yield detectable bursts. For a space-borne interferometer like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, sensitivity is greatest for EMRBs from MBHs of ~10^6-10^7 solar masses, which could be detected out to ~100 Mpc. Considering the examples of M32, NGC 4945 and NGC 4395 we investigate if extragalactic EMRB signals can provide information about their sources. This is possible, but only if the periapse radius of the orbit is small, of the order of r_p < 8 r_g, where r_g = GM/c^2 is the gravitational radius of the MBH. This limits the utility of EMRBs as an astronomical tool. However, if we are lucky, we could place constraints on the mass and spin of nearby MBHs with 1% precision.
Gravitational wave energy spectrum of a parabolic encounter
Christopher P. L. Berry,Jonathan R. Gair
Physics , 2010, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.82.107501
Abstract: We derive an analytic expression for the energy spectrum of gravitational waves from a parabolic Keplerian binary by taking the limit of the Peters and Matthews spectrum for eccentric orbits. This demonstrates that the location of the peak of the energy spectrum depends primarily on the orbital periapse rather than the eccentricity. We compare this weak-field result to strong-field calculations and find it is reasonably accurate (~10%) provided that the azimuthal and radial orbital frequencies do not differ by more than ~10%. For equatorial orbits in the Kerr spacetime, this corresponds to periapse radii of rp > 20M. These results can be used to model radiation bursts from compact objects on highly eccentric orbits about massive black holes in the local Universe, which could be detected by LISA.
Extreme-mass-ratio bursts from the Galactic Centre
Christopher P. L. Berry,Jonathan R. Gair
Physics , 2012,
Abstract: An extreme-mass-ratio burst (EMRB) is a gravitational wave signal emitted when a compact object passes through periapsis on a highly eccentric orbit about a much more massive body, in our case a stellar mass object about the 4.31 \times 10^6 M_sol massive black hole (MBH) in the Galactic Centre. We investigate how EMRBs could constrain the parameters of the Galaxy's MBH. EMRBs should be detectable if the periapsis is r_p < 65 r_g for a \mu = 10 M_sol orbiting object, where r_g = GM/c^2 is the gravitational radius. The signal-to-noise ratio \rho scales like log(\rho) = -2.7 log(r_p/r_g) + log(\mu/M_sol) + 4.9. For periapses smaller than ~ 10 r_g, EMRBs can be informative, providing good constraints on both the MBH's mass and spin.
Linearized f(R) Gravity: Gravitational Radiation & Solar System Tests
Christopher P. L. Berry,Jonathan R. Gair
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.83.104022
Abstract: We investigate the linearized form of metric f(R)-gravity, assuming that f(R) is analytic about R = 0 so it may be expanded as f(R) = R + a_2 R^2/2 + ... . Gravitational radiation is modified, admitting an extra mode of oscillation, that of the Ricci scalar. We derive an effective energy-momentum tensor for the radiation. We also present weak-field metrics for simple sources. These are distinct from the equivalent Kerr (or Schwarzschild) forms. We apply the metrics to tests that could constrain f(R). We show that light deflection experiments cannot distinguish f(R)-gravity from general relativity as both have an effective post-Newtonian parameter \gamma = 1. We find that planetary precession rates are enhanced relative to general relativity; from the orbit of Mercury we derive the bound |a_2| < 1.2 \times 10^18 m^2. Gravitational wave astronomy may be more useful: considering the phase of a gravitational waveform we estimate deviations from general relativity could be measurable for an extreme-mass-ratio inspiral about a 10^6 M_sol black hole if |a_2| > 10^17 m^2, assuming that the weak-field metric of the black hole coincides with that of a point mass. However Eot-Wash experiments provide the strictest bound |a_2| < 2 \times 10^-9 m^2. Although the astronomical bounds are weaker, they are still of interest in the case that the effective form of f(R) is modified in different regions, perhaps through the chameleon mechanism. Assuming the laboratory bound is universal, we conclude that the propagating Ricci scalar mode cannot be excited by astrophysical sources.
Page 1 /209026
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.