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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 144699 matches for " B. Kant "
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Textile dyeing industry an environmental hazard  [PDF]
Rita Kant
Natural Science (NS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2012.41004
Abstract: Color is the main attraction of any fabric. No matter how excellent its constitution, if unsuitably colored it is bound to be a failure as a commercial fabric. Manufacture and use of synthetic dyes for fabric dyeing has therefore become a massive industry today. In fact the art of applying color to fabric has been known to mankind since 3500 BC. WH Perkins in 1856 discovered the use of synthetic dyes. Synthetic dyes have provided a wide range of colorfast, bright hues. However their toxic nature has become a cause of grave concern to environmentalists. Use of synthetic dyes has an adverse effect on all forms of life. Presence of sulphur, naphthol, vat dyes, nitrates, acetic acid, soaps, enzymes chromium compounds and heavy metals like copper, arsenic, lead, cad- mium, mercury, nickel, and cobalt and certain auxiliary chemicals all collectively make the textile effluent highly toxic. Other harmful chemicals present in the water may be formaldehyde based dye fixing agents, chlorinated stain removers, hydro carbon based softeners, non bio degradable dyeing chemicals. These organic materials react with many disinfectants especially chlorine and form by products (DBP’S) that are often carcinogenic and therefore undesirable. Many of these show allergic reactions. The colloidal matter present along with colors and oily scum increases the turbidity, gives the water a bad appearance and foul smell and prevents the penetration of sunlight necessary for the process of photosynthesis. This in turn interferes with the Oxygen transfer mechanism at air water interface which in turn interferes with marine life and self purification process of water. This effluent if allowed to flow in the fields’ clogs the pores of the soil resulting in loss of soil productivity. If allowed to flow in drains and rivers it effects the quality of drinking water in hand pumps making it unfit for human consumption. It is important to remove these pollutants from the waste waters before their final disposal.
Adsorption of Dye Eosin from an Aqueous Solution on two Different Samples of Activated Carbon by Static Batch Method  [PDF]
Rita Kant
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2012.42011
Abstract: Removal of dye Eosin on two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method was studied. Experimental data on optical density of blank solutions of different concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L and optical density of solutions after adsorption on activated carbon samples were taken and analyzed. Calibration curves were plotted and the amount of dye adsorbed was calculated. The data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for two different carbon samples and different concentration values. Constants were calculated from the slope and intercept values of the isotherms. Coefficient of correlation R2 and Standard Deviation SD were also noted. The data fitted well to the iso- therms. It was observed that adsorption decreased with increase in ppm concentrations. Carbon sample C2 showed higher potential to adsorb the dye Eosin as compared to carbon sample C1. Further Carbon sample C2 showed better adsorption in acidic pH as compared to in alkaline pH. From the analysis of the data it is shown that C2 sample has a good capacity to remove the textile dye from the residue water.
Adsorption of yellow dye: Acid yellow RR from its aqueous solution using two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method  [PDF]
Kant Rita
Natural Science (NS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2012.42016
Abstract: Removal of dye Acid Yellow RR, using two different samples of activated carbon by static batch method was studied. Experimental data on optical density of blank solutions of different concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 mg/L and optical density of solutions after adsorption on activated carbon samples were taken and analyzed. Calibration curves were plotted and the amount of dye qe adsorbed was calculated. The data was fitted to Polynomial, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for two different carbon samples and different concentration and pH values. Constants were calculated from the slope and intercept values of the isotherms. Coefficient of correlation R2 and Standard Deviation SD were also noted. The data fitted well to the isotherms. Carbon sample C1 showed higher potential to adsorb the yellow dye. Adsorption was higher at lower concentrations of the solution. Carbon sample C2 showed better adsorption in acidic pH as com- pared to in alkaline pH. From the analysis of the data it is shown that C2 sample has a good capacity to remove the textile dye from the residue water although sample C1 was still better.
(E)-3-(4-Bromophenyl)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one
Rajni Kant,Kamni,B. Narayana,K. Veena
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2009, DOI: 10.1107/s1600536809008162
Abstract: The molecule of the title compound, C15H9BrCl2O, is shown to be the E isomer, with the 3,4-dichlorobenzoyl and p-bromophenyl substituents in trans positions with respect to the chalcone olefin bond. The molecule is non-planar, the two aromatic rings forming a dihedral angle of 49.58 (1)°.
2-(2-Bromophenyl)acetic acid
Rajni Kant,Kamini Kapoor,B. Narayana
Acta Crystallographica Section E , 2012, DOI: 10.1107/s1600536812020545
Abstract: In the title molecule, C8H7BrO2, the carboxyl group is twisted by 76.2 (3)° from the benzene ring plane. In the crystal, molecules are linked into inversion dimers through pairs of O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are further linked into layers parallel to the bc plane by weak C—H...O hydrogen bonds.
Interrupt Based RC5 Remote-decoding Using 8051 μC
L. Jain,T.B. Singha,B. Kant
Journal of Artificial Intelligence , 2013,
Abstract: Generally used remote decoding techniques are based solely on the concept of polling. Such methods waste a considerable amount of precious execution time in polling. Interrupt based systems can utilize this time for multitasking. This study has proposed a new technique based on interrupts and discussed its possible implementation.
Asymmetric Variation in Soil Carbon Emission in Sub-Tropics  [PDF]
Rashmi Kant, Chirashree Ghosh
Atmospheric and Climate Sciences (ACS) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/acs.2012.21012
Abstract: Carbon dioxide emission from soil, known as soil respiration, is one of the major sources of the atmospheric carbon. Understanding the relationship between emission rate and the factors associated with the emission process is important in global carbon emission management. The present study investigated soil respiration at three ecologically diverse locations in northern India. CO2 emission was measured in-situ by modified alkali absorption method at three different depths, top-soil (0 cm - 2 cm depth), mid-soil (20 cm depth) and deep-soil (40 cm depth) at each location. Rate of carbon emission from soil varied with location and time. The rate was higher at Riverine Zone (RZ) which had high soil moisture content and profuse ground vegetation compared to Hilly Zone (HZ) containing dry soil and scarce vegetation. The emission rate was also greater in grassland than the plantation area. Rate of carbon emission from soil was heterogeneous along different depths below the ground. Diel variation in emission rate was greater at HZ compared to RZ. Higher microbial population in soil was detected in RZ than HZ. However, the bacterial count out-numbered the fungal count in soils at most places. The study indicates a positive relationship between soil respiration rate and microbial abundance. The fungal population was strongly correlated with CO2 emission rate.
Effects of plant latex based anti-termite formulations on Indian white termite Odontotermes obesus (Isoptera: Odontotermitidae) in sub-tropical high infestation areas  [PDF]
Ravi Kant Upadhyay
Open Journal of Animal Sciences (OJAS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojas.2013.34042
Abstract: In the present investigation various bioassays were conducted to evaluate the anti-termite efficacy of plant latex based formulations to control population of Indian white termite in subtropical soil. Results reveal that crude latex, its fractions and combinatorial fractions have shown very high toxicity against O. obesus. The LD50 values for different latex fractions of 24 h were in a range of 5.0-17.613 μg/mg while combined mixtures of Calotropis procera have shown synergistic activity against termites and caused comparably high mortality with LD50 1.987-6.016 μg/mg. The mortality rate was found dose and time dependent as it was found to be increased with an increase in dose and exposure period. In olfactometry tests, C. procera latex solvent fractions have shown significant repellency at a very low dose 0.010-0.320 μg/mg. Interestingly, solvent fractions have significantly repelled large numbers of worker termites due to volatile action of active components of latex and different additives. ED50 values obtained in crude latex were 0.121 μg/mg body weights while combinatorial formulations have shown ED50 in between 0.015-0.036 μg/mg. Statistical analysis of repelled and un-repelled termites gave a low Chi-square value (X2
High Performance Polymer Light-Emitting Devices  [PDF]
Vivek Kant Jogi
World Journal of Nano Science and Engineering (WJNSE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/wjnse.2014.41003
Abstract:
In order to improve the performance of polymer light-emitting devices, driving voltages, current efficiency, luminance and power efficiency of different cathode metals such as Ca/Al, CsF/Al, LiF/Al and LiF/Ca/Ag were compared. The results show that cathode metals CsF/Al contain the highest current efficiency, maximum luminance and power efficiency. Therefore, we can choose the CsF/Al to be the cathode for improving the performance of polymer light-emitting devices.
Antimicrobial Activity of Fruit Latexes from Ten Laticiferous Plants  [PDF]
Ravi Kant Upadhyay
American Journal of Plant Sciences (AJPS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2015.63053
Abstract: In the present investigation antibacterial activity of latexes from ten Indian plant species Spondias dulcis (Amra), Diospyros melanoxylon (Tendu), Terminalia bellirica (Wahera), Ficus glomerata (Gular), Phyllanthus emblica (Awla), Thevetia nerifolia (Kaner), Carica papaya (Papita), Calotropis procera (Ak), Ficus benghalensis (Bargad), Atrocarpus heterophyllus (Kathal) collected from Go-rakhpur, North India were determined in various in vitro systems. MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration) values were determined in growth inhibitory bioassays by using different increasing concentrations of various latex extracts. Latex samples were diluted by using serial micro dilution method up to 10-10 method with Luria broth culture medium. These values were obtained significantly 2 - 3 times lower than that of broad spectrum antibiotic drugs. Besides this, inhibition zone diameters were measured in agar disc diffusion assay. A known volume i.e. 0.1 - 20 μg/μl of each latex were coated on separate sterile filter paper discs (Whatman No. 1) measuring 6 mm in size. Latex fractions registered significantly higher growth inhibition than that of broad spectrum antimicrobial drugs. Present study indicates the potential use of shows that both latex and its components and latex as are valuable source of medicinal products/active principles that can be used for treatment of life threatening infectious diseases. Because of higher inhibitory and cidal potential obtained in latexes than the synthetic drugs these that could lead to become efficient phytomedicines mainly to have and develop as complete drug formulations against to control infectious microbes.
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