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Search Results: 1 - 4 of 4 matches for " Avedis Aznavurian "
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Darwin hoy
Avedis Aznavurian
Reencuentro , 2012,
Abstract: En el siglo XXI, las ideas expresadas por Charles Darwin siguen provocando discusiones y polémicas que trascienden el ámbito de la ciencia y se enfrentan, dentro de las ciencias biológicas, a puntos de vista divergentes acerca de la ortodoxia darwiniana planteando hipótesis evolucionistas con fundamentos científicos; en este artículo se examinan también las posibilidades y los logros en este siglo, revisando las interpretaciones y la aplicación de las ideas básicas a problemas científicos actuales como la conciencia y la medicina darwiniana
Femtosecond laser treatment enhances DNA transfection efficiency in vivo
Shaw-Wei D Tsen, Chao-Yi Wu, Avedis Meneshian, Sara I Pai, Chien-Fu Hung, T-C Wu
Journal of Biomedical Science , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1423-0127-16-36
Abstract: In this report, we employed a very low power, near-infrared femtosecond laser technique to enhance the transfection efficiency of intradermally and intratumorally administered DNA plasmid.We found that femtosecond laser treatment can significantly enhance the delivery of DNA into the skin and into established tumors in mice. In addition, we found that both laser power density as well as duration of laser treatment are critical parameters for augmenting DNA transfection efficiency. The femtosecond laser technique employs a relatively unfocused laser beam that maximizes the transfected area, minimizes damage to tissue and simplifies its implementation.This femtosecond new laser technology represents a safe and innovative technology for enhancing DNA gene transfer in vivo.Gene therapy continues to evolve as an attractive approach for the treatment of many diseases (for reviews, see [1-11]). In particular, the use of plasmid DNA for gene therapy has several advantages which can circumvent the limitations and potential risks associated with viral vector-based DNA delivery. It is relatively safe, stable, and inexpensive to manufacture, making it attractive for application in the clinical arena. Furthermore, in contrast to viral vectors, DNA vaccines do not elicit anti-vector immune responses in the vaccinated patient, and, therefore, are well suited for indications likely to require multiple administrations in order to achieve and maintain target immune responses.The ideal approach for enhancing DNA vaccine potency is by improving the transfection efficiency with minimal tissue damage. Several physical techniques including electroporation and ultrasound have been employed in an effort to improve gene transfection efficiency. However, several safety concerns have been raised with the application of these approaches in humans (for reviews, see [12,13]). Therefore, continued exploration for new methods of enhancing DNA transfection efficiency while minimizing side effects is
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt,Avedis Kazanjian,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P. Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F. Shroyer,Bassem A. Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
Atonal homolog 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene
Wouter Bossuyt equal contributor,Avedis Kazanjian equal contributor,Natalie De Geest,Sofie Van Kelst,Gert De Hertogh,Karel Geboes,Greg P Boivin,Judith Luciani,Francois Fuks,Marinee Chuah,Thierry VandenDriessche,Peter Marynen,Jan Cools,Noah F Shroyer ,Bassem A Hassan
PLOS Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1000039
Abstract: Colon cancer accounts for more than 10% of all cancer deaths annually. Our genetic evidence from Drosophila and previous in vitro studies of mammalian Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also called Math1 or Hath1) suggest an anti-oncogenic function for the Atonal group of proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. We asked whether mouse Atoh1 and human ATOH1 act as tumor suppressor genes in vivo. Genetic knockouts in mouse and molecular analyses in the mouse and in human cancer cell lines support a tumor suppressor function for ATOH1. ATOH1 antagonizes tumor formation and growth by regulating proliferation and apoptosis, likely via activation of the Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, colorectal cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma patients show genetic and epigenetic ATOH1 loss-of-function mutations. Our data indicate that ATOH1 may be an early target for oncogenic mutations in tissues where it instructs cellular differentiation.
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