oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 37 )

2018 ( 366 )

2017 ( 379 )

2016 ( 420 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 211033 matches for " Aquilante Christina L "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /211033
Display every page Item
CXCL5 polymorphisms are associated with variable blood pressure in cardiovascular disease-free adults
Beitelshees Amber L,Aquilante Christina L,Allayee Hooman,Langaee Taimour Y
Human Genomics , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1479-7364-6-9
Abstract: Objective Leukocyte count has been associated with blood pressure, hypertension, and hypertensive complications. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in the CXCL5 gene, which encodes the neutrophilic chemokine ENA-78, are associated with blood pressure in cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free adults and that these polymorphisms are functional. Methods and results A total of 192 community-dwelling participants without CVD or risk equivalents were enrolled. Two CXCL5 polymorphisms ( 156 G > C (rs352046) and 398 G > A (rs425535)) were tested for associations with blood pressure. Allele-specific mRNA expression in leukocytes was also measured to determine whether heterozygosity was associated with allelic expression imbalance. In 156 C variant carriers, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was 7 mmHg higher than in 156 G/G wild-type homozygotes (131 ± 17 vs. 124 ± 14 mmHg; P = 0.008). Similarly, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was 4 mmHg higher in 156 C variant carriers (78 ± 11 vs. 74 ± 11 mmHg; P = 0.013). In multivariate analysis of SBP, age, sex, body mass index, and the 156 G > C polymorphism were identified as significant variables. Age, sex, and the 156 G > C SNP were further associated with DBP, along with white blood cells. Allelic expression imbalance and significantly higher circulating ENA-78 concentrations were noted for variant carriers. Conclusion CXCL5 gene polymorphisms are functional and associated with variable blood pressure in CVD-free individuals. The role of CXCL5 as a hypertension- and CVD-susceptibility gene should be further explored.
Influence of SLCO1B1 and CYP2C8 gene polymorphisms on rosiglitazone pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers
Christina L Aquilante, Lane R Bushman, Shannon D Knutsen, Lauren E Burt, Lucille Capo Rome, Lisa A Kosmiski
Human Genomics , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1479-7364-3-1-7
Abstract: Rosiglitazone is an insulin sensitiser in the thiazolidinedione (TZD) drug class. TZDs stimulate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- γ (PPAR-γ) in the cell nucleus and result in increased transcription of numerous genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism and adipocyte differentiation [1]. Due to their glucose-lowering and insulin sensitising effects, TZDs are indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes [2,3]. Although TZDs are effective anti-diabetic agents, significant inter-individual variability exists in their disposition (ie pharmacokinetics) and response (ie pharmacodynamics) in the body. For example, pharmacokinetic data show that rosiglitazone area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), a measure of plasma drug exposure, varies 2.4-fold between healthy individuals [4]. Rosiglitazone clinical response data show that 55 per cent of patients with type 2 diabetes fail to achieve a 30 mg/dl reduction in fasting plasma glucose following 26 weeks of therapy [3]. It is thought that the field of pharmacogenetics may help to provide insight regarding the extent to which genetic differences between people explain the observed variability in rosiglitazone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.To date, many TZD pharmacogenetic investigations have focused on polymorphisms in drug target genes (eg PPAR-γ) and effector protein genes (eg the adiponectin gene) in hopes of explaining drug response variability [5-13]. Although these genes are certainly important, one must also consider the extent to which polymorphisms in drug-metabolising enzyme- and drug transporter genes affect rosiglitazone disposition in the body. Pharmacokinetic differences in plasma drug exposure, as a result of polymorphisms in drug disposition genes, may contribute to inter-individual variability in the glucose-lowering and insulin sensitising effects of the TZDs, and the risk of concentration-dependent side effects.In terms of drug disposition, rosiglitazone is principal
Individual to Community-Level Faunal Responses to Environmental Change from a Marine Fossil Record of Early Miocene Global Warming
Christina L. Belanger
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0036290
Abstract: Modern climate change has a strong potential to shift earth systems and biological communities into novel states that have no present-day analog, leaving ecologists with no observational basis to predict the likely biotic effects. Fossil records contain long time-series of past environmental changes outside the range of modern observation, which are vital for predicting future ecological responses, and are capable of (a) providing detailed information on rates of ecological change, (b) illuminating the environmental drivers of those changes, and (c) recording the effects of environmental change on individual physiological rates. Outcrops of Early Miocene Newport Member of the Astoria Formation (Oregon) provide one such time series. This record of benthic foraminiferal and molluscan community change from continental shelf depths spans a past interval environmental change (~20.3-16.7 mya) during which the region warmed 2.1–4.5°C, surface productivity and benthic organic carbon flux increased, and benthic oxygenation decreased, perhaps driven by intensified upwelling as on the modern Oregon coast. The Newport Member record shows that (a) ecological responses to natural environmental change can be abrupt, (b) productivity can be the primary driver of faunal change during global warming, (c) molluscs had a threshold response to productivity change while foraminifera changed gradually, and (d) changes in bivalve body size and growth rates parallel changes in taxonomic composition at the community level, indicating that, either directly or indirectly through some other biological parameter, the physiological tolerances of species do influence community change. Ecological studies in modern and fossil records that consider multiple ecological levels, environmental parameters, and taxonomic groups can provide critical information for predicting future ecological change and evaluating species vulnerability.
Integral Healthcare: The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine with a Conventional Healthcare Practice
Christina L. Ross
Integrative Medicine Insights , 2012,
Abstract: Today’s medicine is in the midst of an undeniable crisis. Calls to reform healthcare are in the forefront of economic and political discussions worldwide. Economic pressures reduce the amount of time physicians can spend with patients contributing to burnout among medical staff and endangering the patient iatrogenically. Politicians are getting involved as the public is calling for more affordable healthcare. A new paradigm must be embraced in order to address all aspects of this dilemma. It is clear that science and technology have resulted in vastly improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, but the emphasis on science and technology to the exclusion of other elements of healing has also served to limit the development of a model that humanizes healthcare. The healing of a patient must include more than the biology and chemistry of their physical body; by necessity, it must include the mental, emotional and spiritual aspects. Because of these challenges, the development of an integral healthcare system that is rooted in appropriate regulation and supported by rigorous scientific evidence is the direction that many models of integrative healthcare are moving towards in the 21st century.
Integral Healthcare: The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine with a Conventional Healthcare Practice
Christina L. Ross
Integrative Medicine Insights , 2009,
Abstract: Today’s medicine is in the midst of an undeniable crisis. Calls to reform healthcare are in the forefront of economic and political discussions worldwide. Economic pressures reduce the amount of time physicians can spend with patients contributing to burnout among medical staff and endangering the patient iatrogenically. Politicians are getting involved as the public is calling for more affordable healthcare. A new paradigm must be embraced in order to address all aspects of this dilemma. It is clear that science and technology have resulted in vastly improved understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, but the emphasis on science and technology to the exclusion of other elements of healing has also served to limit the development of a model that humanizes healthcare. The healing of a patient must include more than the biology and chemistry of their physical body; by necessity, it must include the mental, emotional and spiritual aspects. Because of these challenges, the development of an integral healthcare system that is rooted in appropriate regulation and supported by rigorous scientific evidence is the direction that many models of integrative healthcare are moving towards in the 21st century.
Fixed point sets of maps homotopic to a given map
Soderlund Christina L
Fixed Point Theory and Applications , 2006,
Abstract: Let be a self-map of a compact, connected polyhedron and a closed subset. We examine necessary and sufficient conditions for realizing as the fixed point set of a map homotopic to . For the case where is a subpolyhedron, two necessary conditions were presented by Schirmer in 1990 and were proven sufficient under appropriate additional hypotheses. We will show that the same conditions remain sufficient when is only assumed to be a locally contractible subset of . The relative form of the realization problem has also been solved for a subpolyhedron of . We also extend these results to the case where is a locally contractible subset.
Fixed point sets of maps homotopic to a given map
Christina L. Soderlund
Fixed Point Theory and Applications , 2006, DOI: 10.1155/fpta/2006/46052
Abstract: Let f:X ¢ ’X be a self-map of a compact, connected polyhedron and | ¢ X a closed subset. We examine necessary and sufficient conditions for realizing | as the fixed point set of a map homotopic to f. For the case where | is a subpolyhedron, two necessary conditions were presented by Schirmer in 1990 and were proven sufficient under appropriate additional hypotheses. We will show that the same conditions remain sufficient when | is only assumed to be a locally contractible subset of X. The relative form of the realization problem has also been solved for | a subpolyhedron of X. We also extend these results to the case where | is a locally contractible subset.
Sex Differences in Counting and Timing
Christina L. Williams
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience , 2012, DOI: 10.3389/fnint.2011.00088
Abstract:
Nutrient Intakes from Food of Lactating Women Do Not Meet Many Dietary Recommendations Important for Infant Development and Maternal Health  [PDF]
Nathan S. Pratt, Holiday A. Durham, Christina L. Sherry
Food and Nutrition Sciences (FNS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/fns.2014.517177
Abstract: Literature describing dietary intakes of lactating mothers in the United States (US) is limited and none of the existing studies attempts to identify whether dietary shortcomings of lactating mothers are distinct from those of women of childbearing age in the US. The first objective of this observational study was to comprehensively analyze the dietary intakes of lactating mothers in the US to determine whether nutrient intakes from food were sufficient to meet recommendations. The second objective was to compare these intakes to those of women of childbearing age in the US. Weekly 3-day food records were collected from subjects for six weeks in 2012-2013. Subject mean daily intakes of food groups, macronutrients, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and specific fats including omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were determined and compared to daily recommendations. Intakes were compared to US women using the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Fruit, vegetable, and dairy intakes of mothers were ≤50% of recommendations, resulting in 12 of 26 analyzed vitamins or minerals including potassium, iodine, chromium, choline, and vitamins A, D, and E having mean daily intakes below the Estimated Average Requirement. Vitamin D intake of subjects was 18% lower than US women, while most other nutrients showed intakes within 10% of each other between populations. Lactating women are not meeting the increased dietary needs associated with breastfeeding, supporting education initiatives and interventions specifically tailored to breastfeeding populations to increase intakes of vitamin D, vitamin E, iodine, biotin, carotenoids, and polyunsaturated fatty acids from food.
The Citizen Science Landscape: From Volunteers to Citizen Sensors and Beyond
Christina L. Catlin-Groves
International Journal of Zoology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/349630
Abstract: Within conservation and ecology, volunteer participation has always been an important component of research. Within the past two decades, this use of volunteers in research has proliferated and evolved into “citizen science.” Technologies are evolving rapidly. Mobile phone technologies and the emergence and uptake of high-speed Web-capable smart phones with GPS and data upload capabilities can allow instant collection and transmission of data. This is frequently used within everyday life particularly on social networking sites. Embedded sensors allow researchers to validate GPS and image data and are now affordable and regularly used by citizens. With the “perfect storm” of technology, data upload, and social networks, citizen science represents a powerful tool. This paper establishes the current state of citizen science within scientific literature, examines underlying themes, explores further possibilities for utilising citizen science within ecology, biodiversity, and biology, and identifies possible directions for further research. The paper highlights (1) lack of trust in the scientific community about the reliability of citizen science data, (2) the move from standardised data collection methods to data mining available datasets, and (3) the blurring of the line between citizen science and citizen sensors and the need to further explore online social networks for data collection. 1. Introduction Within conservation and ecology, volunteer participation has always been an important component of research [1–5]. Within the past two decades, use of volunteers in research has begun to proliferate and evolve into the current form of “citizen science” [6, 7]. Citizen science, a term first coined by Irwin [7], is used to describe a form of research collaboration or data gathering that is performed by untrained or “nonexpert” individuals, often involving members of the public, and frequently thought of as a form of crowd-sourcing [1, 8–12]. Citizen science will usually incorporate an element of public education [2, 6, 13–15]. Silvertown [5] described the differentiation between historical and modern forms of citizen science by potential for it to be “available to all, not just a privileged few.” This has been recently demonstrated by the rapid development of mobile phone technologies, in particularly the emergence and uptake of high-speed Web-capable smart phones with GPS data collection facilities and data upload capabilities [16]. This allows almost instant collection, transmission, and submission of data and provides researchers with a way to validate
Page 1 /211033
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.