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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 222274 matches for " Anton C. Beynen "
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Serum Protein Levels and Hematological Values in Rats Fed a Diet Containing Black Cumin Seed
Nabiela M. El Bagir,Rania T.H. El Amin,Ahmed Alhaidary,Hasab E. Mohamed,Anton C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2604.2607
Abstract: In this study with rats, the influence of a dietary black cumin seed on both serum proteins and blood cell counts was determined. Rats were fed a diet either without or with 15% black cumin seed for 9 weeks. At the end of the experiment, body weights were similar for the two groups of rats. The diet containing black cumin seed slightly but significantly, lowered the concentration of plasma total proteinsbut did not affect the concentrations of albumin, globulins and hemoglobin. The numbers of white and red blood cells were not affected by black cumin seed in the diet and so was the the composition of white blood cells in terms of neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes. After comparing the results of this study with those of studies found in the literature data, it is concluded that black cumin seed has clear effects on serum proteins and blood cells only in rats that are exposed to toxic agents.
Egg Yield and Quality in Laying Hens Fed Diets Containing Black Cumin Seed and/or White Wormwood Leaves
Bakheit A. Yagoub,Ahmed E. Amin,Nabiela M. El Bagir,Ahmed Alhaidary,Hasab E. Mohamed,Anton C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2600.2603
Abstract: Laying hens were fed diets containing either black cumin seed or white wormwood leaves or the combination of the two additives and the effects on egg production and egg quality characteristics were determined. Final body weights were significantly increased in the birds fed the diet with 1% black cumin seed and in those fed the diet with 0.5% of both black cumin seed and white wormwood leaves. Feed intake was numerically lower after the feeding of the diets with 1% white wormwood leaves. Egg production was not significantly influenced by dietary treatment but group-mean egg production was lowered in the hens fed the diet with 1% black cumin seed. Feed conversion efficiency was significantly decreased by the diet containing 1% white wormwood leaves and by the diet with the combination of 1% of black cumin seed and 1% white wormwood leaves. The diet containing 0.5% black cumin seed plus 0.5% white wormwood leaves also significantly decreased feed conversion. Egg weight, shape index, albumen height, Haugh unit, shell thickness and yolk color were not significantly affected by the dietary treatments. The major finding of this study may be that dietary white wormwood improved feed efficiency in laying hens whereas black cumin seed did not.
Clinical Laboratory Serum Values in Rabbits Fed Diets Containing Black Cumin Seed
Nabiela M. El Bagir,Imtithal T.O. Farah,Ahmed Alhaidary,Hasab E. Mohamed,Anton C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2532.2536
Abstract: Ingestion of black cumin seeds has wide variety of biological effects, implying that different processes in the body are influenced simultaneously. To assess to what extent clinical laboratory serum values are affected, rabbits were fed diets containing different levels of whole black cumin seed and serum was collected at various intervals. The base diet consisted of 60% lucerne and 40% sorghum. To formulate the experimental diets either 10, 15 or 20% of the base diet was replaced by black cumin seed. Body-weight gain was increased by the diets with 10 or 15% black cumin but not by the diet with 20%. Dietary black cumin seed raised serum concentrations of total protein, albumin and globulin but the diet with 20% produced lower values than did the 10 and 15% inclusion levels. Black cumin feeding increased serum urea and creatinine and lowered uric acid concentrations. Serum glucose, total lipid and cholesterol concentrations were lowered by consumption of black cumin. Black cumin seed in the diet did not affect the serum activities of alkaline phosphatase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase. Serum sodium and potassium were not influenced by black cumin but serum calcium and phosphate concentrations were increased. The major finding in this study with rabbits is that the highest dietary level of 20% versus either 10 or 15% black cumin seed lowered serum protein concentrations and diminished weight gain.
Performance of Broiler Chickens Fed Diets Containing Low Inclusion Levels of Black Cumin Seed
Lymia H.A. Majeed,Khadiga A. Abdelati,Nabiela M. El Bagir,Ahmed Alhaidary,Hasab E. Mohamed,Anton C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2725.2728
Abstract: An overview of the literature indicates that lower rather than higher dietary concentrations of black cumin seed may have a positive influence on feed efficiency in broiler chickens. In this study, 4 day old broiler chickens were fed either a diet without or with black cumin seed at inclusion levels of 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75% for a period of 7 weeks. Body weight gain during the 1st, 4th and 7th week of the experiment was significantly decreased by each level of dietary black cumin. The diets containing black cumin seed did not significantly influence weight gain and feed efficiency as measured for the entire experimental period. However, the diets with either 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75% black cumin lowered group-mean weight gain by 4.7, 3.3 and 6.5%, respectively and raised the group-mean feed conversion ratio (g feed/g weight gain) by 3.7, 4.8 and 7.0%. The final weights of breast, thigh and drumstick were not affected by the composition of the diet. It is concluded that dietary black cumin seed may deteriorate feed efficiency in broiler chickens in a dose-dependent relationship. It is unclear why the present observation is opposite to the outcome of various earlier studies of other investigators.
Dietary Corn Oil Counteracts Casein-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Rabbits
H.E. Mohamed,A. Alhaidary,A.C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2085.2088
Abstract: In rabbits fed cholesterol-free, semipurified diets, an increase in the intake of casein raises serum cholesterol concentrations, whereas an increase in the dietary level of corn oil has a cholesterol-lowering effect. The question addressed in this study was whether the casein-induced hypercholesterolemia could be antagonized by a high intake of corn oil. Young growing rabbits were fed cholesterol-free, semipurified diets, containing either a relatively low (13.0 energy %) or high level of casein (21.6 energy %), to which extra corn oil (21.1 instead of 5.3 energy %) was added at the expense of an isoenergetic amount of corn starch and dextrose. An increase in casein level as only dietary variable elevated serum cholesterol, whereas an increase in corn oil caused a lowering. The addition of casein to the diet with low content of corn oil produced a high degree of hypercholesterolemia. However, the addition of casein to the diet with high content of corn oil only caused a relatively small increase in serum cholesterol. It is concluded that a high intake of corn oil negates the casein-induced hypercholesterolemia in rabbits.
Calcium Metabolism in Rats Fed Diets Containing Supplemental Chloride
A. Alhaidary,H.E. Mohamed,A.C. Beynen
Research Journal of Biological Sciences , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjbsci.2010.219.222
Abstract: It has been observed earlier that an increase in the dietary chloride concentration causes higher rates of calcium excretion with urine in rats. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the chloride-induced rise in urinary calcium excretion is associated by an increase in intestinal calcium absorption and/or a lowering of calcium deposition in tibia. Female rats aged 4 weeks were fed a purified control diet or a diet containing either 1.61% ammonium chloride or 1.67% calcium chloride. The three diets had identical calcium concentrations and were fed for a period of 6 weeks. There was no effect of dietary treatment on growth and feed intake. Chloride loading produced a significant increase in urinary calcium excretion, the source of chloride not having a differential effect. Apparent calcium absorption and tibia calcium concentrations were not affected by high chloride intake. It remains unknown how calcium homeostasis is attained in rats fed chloride-rich diets.
Nephrocalcinosis and Urinary Mineral Concentrations in Rats Fed Diets Containing Various Concentrations of Magnesium
H.E. Mohamed,A. Alhaidary,A.C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2405.2408
Abstract: High magnesium intakes are known to inhibit the development of nephrocalcinosis in female rats but there was no information on the dose-response relationship and the underlying mechanism. In an attempt to collect the lacking information, female rats were fed diets containing 0.02-0.24% magnesium as the only variable. Increasing dietary magnesium concentrations were found to reduce nephrocalcinosis in a dose-dependent fashion. The lowest dietary magnesium level produced a kidney calcium concentration of 10.6% in the dry matter whereas the highest magnesium intake reduced kidney calcium to 0.2%. Increasing dietary magnesium concentrations produced increasing urinary magnesium concentrations in combination with decreasing phosphorus concentrations. It is suggested that the magnesium-induced inhibition of nephrocalcinosis is caused by a decrease in urinary phosphorus and increase in urinary magnesium.
Nephrocalcinosis and Urinary Mineral Concentrations in Rats Fed Diets Containing Supplemental Chloride
A. Alhaidary,H.E. Mohamed,A.C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/javaa.2010.2409.2411
Abstract: It has been shown that the feeding of an anion-rich diet with supplemental ammonium chloride inhibits the development of nephrocalcinosis in female rats. The present study was carried out to obtain further insight into the inhibitory effect of dietary chloride on nephrocalcinosis. Female rats were fed high-chloride diets with the same chloride contents but containing either ammonium chloride or calcium chloride. The diets were formulated so that chloride was the only variable versus the control diet. Chloride feeding markedly lowered kidney calcium concentrations and nephrocalcinosis scores. The high-chloride diets reduced urinary pH values and raised urinary concentrations of calcium and magnesium but did not influence those of phosphorus. It is concluded that high intakes of ammonium chloride or calcium chloride lower the degree of nephrocalcinosis in female rats through a decrease in urinary pH and an increase in urinary magnesium concentrations.
Calcium Metabolism in Rats Fed Diets Containing Various Concentrations of Magnesium
H.E. Mohamed,A. Alhaidary,A.C. Beynen
Research Journal of Biological Sciences , 2012, DOI: 10.3923/rjbsci.2010.215.218
Abstract: It has been shown earlier in rats that an increase in the dietary magnesium concentration causes higher rates of calcium excretion with urine. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the magnesium-induced rise in urinary calcium excretion is associated by an increase in intestinal calcium absorption and/or a lowering of calcium deposition in tibia. Female rats aged 4 weeks were fed purified diets containing magnesium concentrations of 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.12 or 0.24% for a period of 6 weeks. There was no effect of dietary treatment on growth and feed intake. Dietary magnesium concentrations higher than 0.02% produced a significant increase in urinary calcium excretion. Apparent calcium absorption and tibia calcium concentrations were not affected by magnesium intake. The efficiency of apparent calcium absorption fell markedly with increasing age. It remains unknown how calcium homeostasis is attained in rats fed magnesium-rich diets.
Plasma Vitamin C Concentrations in Nubian and Saanen Goats During Pregnancy and Lactation
H.E. Mohamed,A.C. Beynen
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances , 2012,
Abstract: Plasma vitamin C concentrations were determined in Saanen and Nubian goats kept in Sudan and while they were either pregnant or lactating. The plasma vitamin C concentrations were lower during pregnancy than during either pre-pregnancy or lactation. The concentrations were lower in the Saanen than in the Nubian goats. Vitamin C concentrations in milk from the Saanen goats were lower than in milk from the Nubian goats, but absolute excretion was higher in the former breed. Saanen kids had lower plasma vitamin C concentrations than Nubian kids. It is suggested tentatively that the low vitamin C status of the Saanen goats during pregnancy is associated with less resistance to disease.
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