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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 223712 matches for " Andrew L. Hellewell "
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Analysis of Familial Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Type 4 (FHL-4) Mutant Proteins Reveals that S-Acylation Is Required for the Function of Syntaxin 11 in Natural Killer Cells
Andrew L. Hellewell, Ombretta Foresti, Nicola Gover, Morwenna Y. Porter, Eric W. Hewitt
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0098900
Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cell secretory lysosome exocytosis and cytotoxicity are impaired in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 4 (FHL-4), a disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the SNARE protein syntaxin 11. We show that syntaxin 11 binds to SNAP23 in NK cells and that this interaction is reduced by FHL-4 truncation and frameshift mutation proteins that delete all or part of the SNARE domain of syntaxin 11. In contrast the FHL-4 mutant proteins bound to the Sec-1/Munc18-like (SM) protein Munc18-2. We demonstrate that the C-terminal cysteine rich region of syntaxin 11, which is deleted in the FHL-4 mutants, is S-acylated. This posttranslational modification is required for the membrane association of syntaxin 11 and for its polarization to the immunological synapse in NK cells conjugated to target cells. Moreover, we show that Munc18-2 is recruited by syntaxin 11 to intracellular membranes in resting NK cells and to the immunological synapse in activated NK cells. This recruitment of Munc18-2 is abolished by deletion of the C-terminal cysteine rich region of syntaxin 11. These results suggest a pivotal role for S-acylation in the function of syntaxin 11 in NK cells.
The long term treatment of schizophrenia: effect on patients lives
Hellewell Jonathan
Annals of General Psychiatry , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1744-859x-5-s1-s40
Abstract:
Convergence of Invariant Measures of Truncation Approximations to Markov Processes  [PDF]
Andrew G. Hart, Richard L. Tweedie
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/am.2012.312A301
Abstract: Let Q be the Q-matrix of an irreducible, positive recurrent Markov process on a countable state space. We show that, under a number of conditions, the stationary distributions of the n × n north-west corner augmentations of Q converge in total variation to the stationary distribution of the process. Two conditions guaranteeing such convergence include exponential ergodicity and stochastic monotonicity of the process. The same also holds for processes dominated by a stochastically monotone Markov process. In addition, we shall show that finite perturbations of stochastically monotone processes may be viewed as being dominated by a stochastically monotone process, thus extending the scope of these results to a larger class of processes. Consequently, the augmentation method provides an attractive, intuitive method for approximating the stationary distributions of a large class of Markov processes on countably infinite state spaces from a finite amount of known information.

Guilty Molecules, Guilty Minds? The Conflicting Roles of the Innate Immune Response to Traumatic Brain Injury
Sarah Claire Hellewell,Maria Cristina Morganti-Kossmann
Mediators of Inflammation , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/356494
Abstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex disease in the most complex organ of the body, whose victims endure lifelong debilitating physical, emotional, and psychosocial consequences. Despite advances in clinical care, there is no effective neuroprotective therapy for TBI, with almost every compound showing promise experimentally having disappointing results in the clinic. The complex and highly interrelated innate immune responses govern both the beneficial and deleterious molecular consequences of TBI and are present as an attractive therapeutic target. This paper discusses the positive, negative, and often conflicting roles of the innate immune response to TBI in both an experimental and clinical settings and highlights recent advances in the search for therapeutic candidates for the treatment of TBI.
Description of an in vivo model for the assessment of eosinophil chemoattractants in the mouse
Teixeira, Mauro M;Williams, Timothy J;Hellewell, Paul G;
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1997, DOI: 10.1590/S0074-02761997000800029
Abstract: chemokines (chemoattractant cytokines) induce potent and selective chemotaxis of leukocyte subsets in vitro. here, we review briefly the chemokines shown to induce eosinophil chemotaxis in vitro and describe a novel model for the study of the ability of chemokines to stimulate eosinophil migration in vivo. eosinophils were purified from the blood of mice over-expressing the il-5 gene and labelled with 111in. only the c-c chemokines, eotaxin and mip-1a, but not rantes, mcp-1, mcp-3, mcp-4, mip-1?, kc and mip-2, effectively induced the recruitment of 111in-eosinophils in mouse skin. we suggest that this mouse model will be useful in assessing the role of endogenously-generated chemokines in mediating eosinophil migration to sites of allergic inflammation in vivo.
Description of an in vivo model for the assessment of eosinophil chemoattractants in the mouse
Teixeira Mauro M,Williams Timothy J,Hellewell Paul G
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz , 1997,
Abstract: Chemokines (chemoattractant cytokines) induce potent and selective chemotaxis of leukocyte subsets in vitro. Here, we review briefly the chemokines shown to induce eosinophil chemotaxis in vitro and describe a novel model for the study of the ability of chemokines to stimulate eosinophil migration in vivo. Eosinophils were purified from the blood of mice over-expressing the IL-5 gene and labelled with 111In. Only the C-C chemokines, eotaxin and MIP-1alpha, but not RANTES, MCP-1, MCP-3, MCP-4, MIP-1 , KC and MIP-2, effectively induced the recruitment of 111In-eosinophils in mouse skin. We suggest that this mouse model will be useful in assessing the role of endogenously-generated chemokines in mediating eosinophil migration to sites of allergic inflammation in vivo.
Consumer Labels can Convey Polyphenolic Content: Implications for Public Health
Andrew L. Waterhouse
Clinical and Developmental Immunology , 2005, DOI: 10.1080/10446670410001722249
Abstract: Polyphenolics are a large group of related substances. Many of these, in fact much of that found in food, is composed of processing-derived substances too complex for complete identification. Recent studies have suggested likely benefits for diets high in polyphenols, particular in reducing heart disease mortality, but other benefits have also been suggested. A consumer label based on the major polyphenolic classes is both manageable and fairly informative as most foods do not contain all possible classes. Differences between class member can be significant, but data on individual substances is impractical and no data is certainly less informative. Equivalency scales may be useful but may skew content of many foods towards the high-equivalency substances, even while the full beneficial effects of each individual substance is poorly described.
The importance of open access in technology transfer for marine ornamental aquaculture: The case of hobbyist-led breeding initiatives
Andrew L. Rhyne
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation , 2010,
Abstract: Access to peer-reviewed literature is often restricted to a limited segment of the target audience.Barriers are in place to prevent open access of information. In the applied research science of aquaculture,these barriers have slowed progress and innovation. Here, I present a case study of how the internet andhobbyists are transforming both access and flow of information from closed circles to open dialogue withinthe field of marine ornamental fish rearing. This open approach is leading to innovation a rate remarkablyfaster and at a lower costs than could have been accomplished by traditional methods. Aquaculturesocieties, aquarium professionals, hobbyists, and scientists pursuing the captive production of speciesshould embrace this movement. Whether production is for profit, conservation, or pure enjoyment, thefree flow of information provides exciting new opportunities.
A History of American Archaeology, by Gordon R. Willey and Jeremy A. Sabloff, 3rd edition. W. H. Freeman and Co., New York, 1993
Andrew L. Christenson
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology , 1995, DOI: 10.5334/bha.05206
Abstract: Those who were waiting to see dramatic changes in Willey and Sabloff will be disappointed. The first five chapters are virtually identical to the previous edition, except that Indians have been transformed into Native Americans and the footnotes have been expanded somewhat to incorporate new publications. I have little to say about this section, which comprises two thirds of the book, and which does a reasonable job of covering the major archaeologists and themes of the first 100+ years of American archaeology. There are always specific points that one can take issue with but the authors make a real effort to cover American archaeology prior to 1960 in its broadest sense.
Keneti: South Seas Adventures of Kenneth Emory, by Bob Krause University of Hawaii Press, 1988
Andrew L. Christenson
Bulletin of the History of Archaeology , 1991, DOI: 10.5334/bha.01204
Abstract: Most American archaeologists have not heard of Kenneth Emory, even though he is one of the senior American archaeologists. The problem is that he lives and did much of his work in the only state not in North America, an area not normally included in overviews or histories of "American" archaeology. Emory was raised in Hawaii (his parents moved there from Massachusetts when he was two), but received an Ivy League education (Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale). A biology major as an undergraduate at Dartmouth, he had developed an interest in Hawaiian language and folklore when growing up in Honolulu. The year he graduated (1921 ). a meeting with Herbert Gregory, the new director of the Bishop Museum, netted him a $75 per month job as assistant ethnologist. According to his biographer, Emory had to look the word up after the interview! Gregory, a geologist and noted southwestern explorer, had grand plans of major ethnological research in the Pacific and Emory was one of the several people to be hired as part of this program (others included Robert T. Aitken. E.S. Handy, Ralph Linton, and E. W. Gifford).
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