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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 149699 matches for " Amalou H "
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Acute bronchospasm and resolution captured on dynamic CT
Amalou H, Wood BJ
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S36127
Abstract: cute bronchospasm and resolution captured on dynamic CT Case report (1241) Total Article Views Authors: Amalou H, Wood BJ Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 61 - 63 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S36127 Received: 19 July 2012 Accepted: 09 August 2012 Published: 31 October 2012 Hayet Amalou, Bradford J Wood Center for Interventional Oncology, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Computed tomography (CT) imaging provides a noninvasive window beneath the skin, defines lung pathology, and facilitates virtual and multimodality fusion interventions. A CT scan of acute bronchospasm is shown during a CT-guided lung intervention. Dynamic or sequential CT imaging can depict and perhaps even quantify acute reversible bronchospasm, and could potentially play a role in better understanding pharmacologic interventions for reactive airways and the resulting effects.
Acute bronchospasm and resolution captured on dynamic CT
Amalou H,Wood BJ
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2012,
Abstract: Hayet Amalou, Bradford J WoodCenter for Interventional Oncology, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Computed tomography (CT) imaging provides a noninvasive window beneath the skin, defines lung pathology, and facilitates virtual and multimodality fusion interventions. A CT scan of acute bronchospasm is shown during a CT-guided lung intervention. Dynamic or sequential CT imaging can depict and perhaps even quantify acute reversible bronchospasm, and could potentially play a role in better understanding pharmacologic interventions for reactive airways and the resulting effects.Keywords: acute bronchospasm, dynamic CT, albuterol, physiological response, noninvasive
Multimodality Fusion with MRI, CT, and Ultrasound Contrast for Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma
Hayet Amalou,Bradford J. Wood
Case Reports in Urology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/390912
Abstract:
Multimodality Fusion with MRI, CT, and Ultrasound Contrast for Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma
Hayet Amalou,Bradford J. Wood
Case Reports in Urology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/390912
Abstract: Fusion technology with electromagnetic (EM) tracking enables navigation with multimodality feedback that lets the operator use different modalities during different parts of the image-guided procedure. This may be particularly helpful in patients with renal insufficiency undergoing kidney tumor ablation, in whom there is a desire to minimize or avoid nephrotoxic iodinated contrast exposure. EM tracking software merges and fuses different imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, and ultrasound and can also display the position of needles in real time in relation to preprocedure imaging, which may better define tumor targets than available intraoperative imaging. EM tracking was successfully used to ablate a poorly visualized renal tumor, through the combined use of CT, gadolinium-enhanced MR, and contrast-enhanced US imaging to localize the tumor. 1. Introduction Although surgical resection remains the gold standard for treating renal cell carcinoma, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or cryoablation of renal lesions is widely becoming accepted as an effective treatment modality for patients that are poor surgical candidates, or in whom poor renal function necessitates a nephron-sparing approach [1]. The most technically challenging portion of an ablation procedure may be the localization of the tumor margins, which may be best defined on a modality (or enhancement phase) not immediately available during the procedure. Renal tumors may be poorly visualized with unenhanced CT or US and may be only visible on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US), CT, and MRI [1]. However, MR-guided interventions are limited by cost, availability, and special equipment needs. EM tracking allows real-time visualization of needle-tip position and angle of trajectory superimposed upon a pre-procedural image. Such systems require an electromagnetic field generator and a special introducer needle or stylet with a sensor coil embedded within an introducer needle or clipped to the needle hub. A small current is induced by the coil, as it moves within the changing electromagnetic field. This changing current reports three dimensional position coordinates and trajectory. Coregistration or matching of modalities is accomplished by placing fiducials or a fiducial patch on the skin near the field of interest. The coordinates are semiautomatically matched between the image and the fiducial, then a virtual image of the needle position is superimposed upon prior CT, MRI, and/or PET [2]. A composite fusion image can be displayed blending (or displaying side by side) two or more modalities along with
Euler-Lagrange Elasticity: Differential Equations for Elasticity without Stress or Strain  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2013.17004
Abstract:

Differential equations to describe elasticity are derived without the use of stress or strain. The points within the body are the independent parameters instead of strain and surface forces replace stress tensors. These differential equations are a continuous analytical model that can then be solved using any of the standard techniques of differential equations. Although the equations do not require the definition stress or strain, these quantities can be calculated as dependent parameters. This approach to elasticity is simple, which avoids the need for multiple definitions of stress and strain, and provides a simple experimental procedure to find scalar representations of material properties in terms of the energy of deformation. The derived differential equations describe both infinitesimal and finite deformations.

Euler-Lagrange Elasticity with Dynamics  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2014.213138
Abstract: The equations of Euler-Lagrange elasticity describe elastic deformations without reference to stress or strain. These equations as previously published are applicable only to quasi-static deformations. This paper extends these equations to include time dependent deformations. To accomplish this, an appropriate Lagrangian is defined and an extrema of the integral of this Lagrangian over the original material volume and time is found. The result is a set of Euler equations for the dynamics of elastic materials without stress or strain, which are appropriate for both finite and infinitesimal deformations of both isotropic and anisotropic materials. Finally, the resulting equations are shown to be no more than Newton's Laws applied to each infinitesimal volume of the material.
Linear Algebra Provides a Basis for Elasticity without Stress or Strain  [PDF]
H. H. Hardy
Soft (Soft) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/soft.2015.43003
Abstract: Linear algebra provides insights into the description of elasticity without stress or strain. Classical descriptions of elasticity usually begin with defining stress and strain and the constitutive equations of the material that relate these to each other. Elasticity without stress or strain begins with the positions of the points and the energy of deformation. The energy of deformation as a function of the positions of the points within the material provides the material properties for the model. A discrete or continuous model of the deformation can be constructed by minimizing the total energy of deformation. As presented, this approach is limited to hyper-elastic materials, but is appropriate for infinitesimal and finite deformations, isotropic and anisotropic materials, as well as quasi-static and dynamic responses.
Spectral resolution in hyperbolic orbifolds, quantum chaos, and cosmology
H. Then
Physics , 2007,
Abstract: We present a few subjects from physics that have one in common: the spectral resolution of the Laplacian.
Arithmetic quantum chaos of Maass waveforms
H. Then
Mathematics , 2003,
Abstract: We compute numerically eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum Hamiltonian that describes the quantum mechanics of a point particle moving freely in a particular three-dimensional hyperbolic space of finite volume and investigate the distribution of the eigenvalues.
Maass cusp forms for large eigenvalues
H. Then
Mathematics , 2003,
Abstract: We investigate the numerical computation of Maass cusp forms for the modular group corresponding to large eigenvalues. We present Fourier coefficients of two cusp forms whose eigenvalues exceed r=40000. These eigenvalues are the largest that have so far been found in the case of the modular group. They are larger than the 130millionth eigenvalue.
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