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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 18938 matches for " Al-Harbi KS "
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Treatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions
Al-Harbi KS
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S29716
Abstract: eatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions Review (3662) Total Article Views Authors: Al-Harbi KS Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 369 - 388 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S29716 Received: 05 January 2012 Accepted: 21 February 2012 Published: 01 May 2012 Khalid Saad Al-Harbi Medical College, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Patients with major depression respond to antidepressant treatment, but 10%–30% of them do not improve or show a partial response coupled with functional impairment, poor quality of life, suicide ideation and attempts, self-injurious behavior, and a high relapse rate. The aim of this paper is to review the therapeutic options for treating resistant major depressive disorder, as well as evaluating further therapeutic options. Methods: In addition to Google Scholar and Quertle searches, a PubMed search using key words was conducted, and relevant articles published in English peer-reviewed journals (1990–2011) were retrieved. Only those papers that directly addressed treatment options for treatment-resistant depression were retained for extensive review. Results: Treatment-resistant depression, a complex clinical problem caused by multiple risk factors, is targeted by integrated therapeutic strategies, which include optimization of medications, a combination of antidepressants, switching of antidepressants, and augmentation with non-antidepressants, psychosocial and cultural therapies, and somatic therapies including electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation. As a corollary, more than a third of patients with treatment-resistant depression tend to achieve remission and the rest continue to suffer from residual symptoms. The latter group of patients needs further study to identify the most effective therapeutic modalities. Newer biomarker-based antidepressants and other drugs, together with non-drug strategies, are on the horizon to address further the multiple complex issues of treatment-resistant depression. Conclusion: Treatment-resistant depression continues to challenge mental health care providers, and further relevant research involving newer drugs is warranted to improve the quality of life of patients with the disorder.
Treatment-resistant depression: therapeutic trends, challenges, and future directions
Al-Harbi KS
Patient Preference and Adherence , 2012,
Abstract: Khalid Saad Al-HarbiMedical College, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Patients with major depression respond to antidepressant treatment, but 10%–30% of them do not improve or show a partial response coupled with functional impairment, poor quality of life, suicide ideation and attempts, self-injurious behavior, and a high relapse rate. The aim of this paper is to review the therapeutic options for treating resistant major depressive disorder, as well as evaluating further therapeutic options.Methods: In addition to Google Scholar and Quertle searches, a PubMed search using key words was conducted, and relevant articles published in English peer-reviewed journals (1990–2011) were retrieved. Only those papers that directly addressed treatment options for treatment-resistant depression were retained for extensive review.Results: Treatment-resistant depression, a complex clinical problem caused by multiple risk factors, is targeted by integrated therapeutic strategies, which include optimization of medications, a combination of antidepressants, switching of antidepressants, and augmentation with non-antidepressants, psychosocial and cultural therapies, and somatic therapies including electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and vagus nerve stimulation. As a corollary, more than a third of patients with treatment-resistant depression tend to achieve remission and the rest continue to suffer from residual symptoms. The latter group of patients needs further study to identify the most effective therapeutic modalities. Newer biomarker-based antidepressants and other drugs, together with non-drug strategies, are on the horizon to address further the multiple complex issues of treatment-resistant depression.Conclusion: Treatment-resistant depression continues to challenge mental health care providers, and further relevant research involving newer drugs is warranted to improve the quality of life of patients with the disorder.Keywords: treatment-resistant depression, antidepressants, biomarkers, therapeutic options, somatic therapies
Neuromodulation therapies and treatment-resistant depression
Al-Harbi KS, Qureshi NA
Medical Devices: Evidence and Research , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S33198
Abstract: romodulation therapies and treatment-resistant depression Review (1866) Total Article Views Authors: Al-Harbi KS, Qureshi NA Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 53 - 65 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S33198 Received: 22 April 2012 Accepted: 13 May 2012 Published: 13 July 2012 Khalid Saad Al-Harbi,1 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi2 1National Guard Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2General Administration for Research and Studies and Mental Health and Social Services, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) who showed partial response to pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions need a trial of neuromodulation therapies (NTs). Objective: This paper aims to review evidence-based data on the use of NTs in TRD. Method: Using keywords and combined-word strategy, multiple computer searches of PubMed, Google Scholar, Quertle(R), and Medline were conducted for retrieving relevant articles published in English-language peer-reviewed journals (2000–2012). Those papers that addressed NTs in TRD were retained for extensive review. Results: Despite methodological challenges, a range of 30%–93% of TRD patients showed substantial improvement to one of the NTs. One hundred–percent improvement was reported in two single-case studies on deep brain stimulation. Some studies reported no benefits from transcranial direct current stimulation. NTs were reported to have good clinical efficacy, better safety margin, and benign side-effect profile. Data are limited regarding randomized clinical trials, long-term efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of these approaches. Both modified electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy were associated with reversible but disturbing neurocognitive adverse effects. Besides clinical utility, NTs including approaches on the horizon may unlock the biological basis underlying mood disorders including TRD. Conclusion: NTs are promising in patients with TRD, as the majority of them show good clinical response measured by standardized depression scales. NTs need further technological refinements and optimization together with continuing well-designed studies that recruit larger numbers of participants with TRD.
Neuromodulation therapies and treatment-resistant depression
Al-Harbi KS,Qureshi NA
Medical Devices: Evidence and Research , 2012,
Abstract: Khalid Saad Al-Harbi,1 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi21National Guard Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2General Administration for Research and Studies and Mental Health and Social Services, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) who showed partial response to pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions need a trial of neuromodulation therapies (NTs).Objective: This paper aims to review evidence-based data on the use of NTs in TRD.Method: Using keywords and combined-word strategy, multiple computer searches of PubMed, Google Scholar, Quertle(R), and Medline were conducted for retrieving relevant articles published in English-language peer-reviewed journals (2000–2012). Those papers that addressed NTs in TRD were retained for extensive review.Results: Despite methodological challenges, a range of 30%–93% of TRD patients showed substantial improvement to one of the NTs. One hundred–percent improvement was reported in two single-case studies on deep brain stimulation. Some studies reported no benefits from transcranial direct current stimulation. NTs were reported to have good clinical efficacy, better safety margin, and benign side-effect profile. Data are limited regarding randomized clinical trials, long-term efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of these approaches. Both modified electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy were associated with reversible but disturbing neurocognitive adverse effects. Besides clinical utility, NTs including approaches on the horizon may unlock the biological basis underlying mood disorders including TRD.Conclusion: NTs are promising in patients with TRD, as the majority of them show good clinical response measured by standardized depression scales. NTs need further technological refinements and optimization together with continuing well-designed studies that recruit larger numbers of participants with TRD.Keywords: treatment-resistant depression, neuromodulation therapies, modified electroconvulsive therapy, deep brain stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy
Self-Similar Solution of Heat and Mass Transfer of Unsteady Mixed Convection Flow on a Rotating Cone Embedded in a Porous Medium Saturated with a Rotating Fluid  [PDF]
Saleh M. Al-Harbi
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/am.2011.210166
Abstract: A self-similar solution of unsteady mixed convection flow on a rotating cone embedded in a porous medium saturated with a rotating fluid in the presence of the first and second orders resistances has been obtained. It has been shown that a self-similar solution is possible when the free stream angular velocity and the angular velocity of the cone vary inversely as a linear function of time. The system of ordinary differential equations governing the flow has been solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme in combination with the quasi-linearization technique. Both prescribe wall temperature and prescribed heat flux conditions are considered. Numerical results are reported for the skin friction coefficients, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. The effect of various parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are also presented here.
Crystallization Kinetics of Melt-Blended Low-Density Phthalic Anhydride with a Low-Tg Tin-Phosphate  [PDF]
Laila M. Al-Harbi
Open Journal of Polymer Chemistry (OJPChem) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojpchem.2014.43005
Abstract:

Polyamide prepared by the reaction of ethylene diamine with different ratios between 1,6-glyconic acid and phthalic anhydride. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to study the nonisothermal and isothermal crystallization of low density polyamides in phosphate glass (Pglass)-polymer hybrid blends. The % crystallinity decreased as the Pglass volume increased. The half-life (t1/2) for crystallization decreased as the propagation rate constant rose for both the polymer matrices with increasing Pglass concentrations. The results show that the Pglass is improved nucleating agent for formation of the Pglass-polymer hybrids up to 35% Pglass and the energy necessary to break decreased. The stability of the reaction of ethylene diamine with phthalic anhydride and glyconic acid was qualitatively investigated using molecular orbital calculations.

Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Gaffas EM, Sequeira RP, Al Namla RA, Al-Harbi KS
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S31045
Abstract: t blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Original Research (1575) Total Article Views Authors: Gaffas EM, Sequeira RP, Al Namla RA, Al-Harbi KS Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 31 - 46 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S31045 Received: 20 February 2012 Accepted: 21 March 2012 Published: 24 May 2012 Eisha M Gaffas,1 Reginald P Sequeira,2 Riyadh A Al Namla,1 Khalid S Al-Harbi3 1Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain; 3King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs) are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations. Objective: To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program. Methods: Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited. Results: Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program. Conclusion: A systematic approach using a documentary and content analysis technique was used to develop test blueprints with additional input from an expert panel as appropriate. Test blueprinting is an important step to ensure the test validity in all residency programs.
Test blueprints for psychiatry residency in-training written examinations in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
Gaffas EM,Sequeira RP,Al Namla RA,Al-Harbi KS
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Eisha M Gaffas,1 Reginald P Sequeira,2 Riyadh A Al Namla,1 Khalid S Al-Harbi31Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain; 3King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The postgraduate training program in psychiatry in Saudi Arabia, which was established in 1997, is a 4-year residency program. Written exams comprising of multiple choice questions (MCQs) are used as a summative assessment of residents in order to determine their eligibility for promotion from one year to the next. Test blueprints are not used in preparing examinations.Objective: To develop test blueprints for the written examinations used in the psychiatry residency program.Methods: Based on the guidelines of four professional bodies, documentary analysis was used to develop global and detailed test blueprints for each year of the residency program. An expert panel participated during piloting and final modification of the test blueprints. Their opinion about the content, weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be sampled in each cognitive category as defined by modified Bloom's taxonomy were elicited.Results: Eight global and detailed test blueprints, two for each year of the psychiatry residency program, were developed. The global test blueprints were reviewed by experts and piloted. Six experts participated in the final modification of test blueprints. Based on expert consensus, the content, total weightage for each content domain, and proportion of test items to be included in each cognitive category were determined for each global test blueprint. Experts also suggested progressively decreasing the weightage for recall test items and increasing problem solving test items in examinations, from year 1 to year 4 of the psychiatry residence program.Conclusion: A systematic approach using a documentary and content analysis technique was used to develop test blueprints with additional input from an expert panel as appropriate. Test blueprinting is an important step to ensure the test validity in all residency programs.Keywords: test blueprinting, psychiatry, residency program, summative assessment, documentary and content analysis, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Healthcare Providers’ Perceptions towards Health Information Applications at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, Saudi Arabia
Abeer Al-Harbi
International Journal of Advanced Computer Sciences and Applications , 2011,
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of healthcare providers towards health information technology applications in King Abdul-Aziz Medical City (KAMC) in terms of benefits, barriers, and motivation to use these applications. Data Collection: The study population consists of all healthcare providers working at KAMC. A sample size of 623 was drawn from a population of 7493 healthcare providers using convenience random sampling method. Of 623 questionnaires distributed, 377 were returned, giving a response rate of 60.5 percent. Measurement A self-administered questionnaire was developed based on extended literature review. The questionnaire comprised 25 statements measuring benefits, barriers, and motivation to use health information applications to be responded on a five-point Likert-scale. In addition, the questionnaire included questions on demographic and organizational variables. Results: The results show that the majority of healthcare providers had good knowledge and skills in information technology, as most of them use KAMC health information applications regularly and/or had training courses in the field. The results indicated that training has a significant positive effect on health providers' IT knowledge and skills. The majority of healthcare providers perceived that the information technology applications in KAMC are valuable and beneficial to both patients and KAMC. However, the healthcare providers were split over the barriers to HIT use in KAMC. As for drivers, the results showed that healthcare providers generally would be motivated to use IT applications in KAMC by provision of new applications and training, contribution in change hospital's work procedures, and provision of technical support. Finally, the results showed the perceptions of healthcare providers on benefits, barriers and motives were influenced by gender, occupation and training. However, the effect of these variables on healthcare providers towards benefits, barriers and motives of IT use were inconsistent. Conclusion: Despite the perceived benefits and motives of health information applications, there were many barriers identified by healthcare providers. These were insufficient number of computers, frequent system down, and the use of computerized systems is time consuming. Furthermore, there were significant differences in the perceptions of healthcare providers towards benefits, barriers, and motives to health information technology with respect gender, occupation, and training.
Faith and fate in medical practice
Al-Harbi Ali
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2008,
Abstract:
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