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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2852 matches for " Akira Tsuda "
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Relationship between Stage of Change for Three Health Behaviors and Perceived Stress in Chinese Adults  [PDF]
Ke Deng, Akira Tsuda
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.39037
Abstract:

We propose stress management behavior, exercise, and scheduled sleep to represent the general intention and actual practices aimed to relieve stress by the application of the transtheoretical model (TTM). Randomly selected Chinese adults aged 18 - 64 were tested through an internet survey. The stage distributions for the three health behaviors were different across the Chinese adults. Stress was significantly higher in action and maintenance stages than in precontemplation and contemplation stages across three health behaviors. Our findings have provided preliminary findings on the applicability of TTM on the three health behaviors in Chinese adults with evidence of concurrent criterion validity.

Effect of a Four-Week Self-Administered Acupressure Intervention on Perceived Stress over the Past Month  [PDF]
Yasuhiro Honda, Akira Tsuda, Satoshi Horiuchi
Open Journal of Medical Psychology (OJMP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojmp.2012.13004
Abstract: The use of relaxation techniques in daily life is an effective means for the self-management of stress. Acupressure is a traditional technique where pressure is applied to acupuncture points instead of puncturing the skin. Self-administered acupressure is a potential method for dealing with stress. The effect of self-administered acupressure on anxiety has been examined but whether it can reduce perceived stress over longer periods is unknown. This study aimed to examine whether a self-administered, four-week acupressure intervention would reduce perceived stress over the past month. Fifteen male and nine female college students (age, 28.9 ± 8.51 yr) majoring in acupuncture and moxibustion medicine were randomly assigned to self-acupressure (AG) and control groups (CG). AG participants were instructed to conduct five sessions of acupressure in the morning, midday, and night. Each session included pressing six acupressure points on the neck (three points on the left and right side each) for five seconds. CG participants were asked to spend their daily life as usual. The outcome was the perceived stress level during the past month, which was assessed using a reliable and valid four-item scale. Perceived stress was measured at baseline, two weeks later, and after intervention. The stress level did not significantly differ between the two groups at baseline. In the AG, the stress level decreased from baseline to two weeks later and remained constant until the end of intervention. The stress level was significantly lower in the AG than in the CG only after intervention. These results provided initial evidence that self-administered acupressure reduces perceived stress over the past month.
Four-Week Self-Administered Acupressure Improves Depressive Mood  [PDF]
Yasuhiro Honda, Akira Tsuda, Satoshi Horiuchi
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2012.329121
Abstract: Acupressure is a Chinese medical technique that involves application of pressure to acupuncture points on the body. This study aimed to examine whether a four-week self-administered acupressure course could reduce depressive mood. Sixteen male and nine female college students (33.2 ± 10.0 years) who majored in acupuncture and moxibustion medicine were randomly assigned to either a self-administered acupressure group or a control group. The participants in the self-administered acupressure group were instructed to conduct five acupressure sessions three times a day (morning, midday, and night). Each session included applying pressure on three points on the left and right side of the neck for five seconds. The controls were asked to continue their daily routine. Depressive mood levels were measured at baseline, two weeks later, and following intervention. Depressive mood levels were similar between both groups at baseline. It decreased two weeks later and remained constant until the end of the intervention. Depressive mood levels were significantly lower in the self-administered acupressure group than in the control group at two weeks from baseline and after intervention. These results provide initial evidence that self-admin- istered acupressure may improve depressive mood.
Validity of the Neck Meridian Test as a Measure of Stress  [PDF]
Yasuhiro Honda, Akira Tsuda, Satoshi Horiuchi
Open Journal of Medical Psychology (OJMP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojmp.2012.14013
Abstract: The neck meridian test is a procedure in which the participant is requested to stretch the neck in four directions and rate the intensity of pain felt and/or symptoms. The total score of the four responses has been shown to correlate with the level of perceived stress, and it has been suggested that it may be possible to use this test as a measure of perceived stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced stress on the neck meridian test score. It was predicted that the neck meridian test score would increase only in participants who were exposed to stress manipulation. The participants were 19 male and 9 female college students (age, 34.1 ± 9.37 years) majoring in acupuncture and moxibustion medicine. The participants were randomly assigned to a stress group and a control group. All participants were requested to rest for 3 min and then complete the neck meridian test. Subsequently, they were administered a stress questionnaire. The participants in the stress group were instructed to prepare mentally for 3 min for a small 1-min examination that included performance in front of a judge, while those in the control group were requested to rest for additional 3 min. After each period, the participants completed the neck meridian test and were administered a stress questionnaire. The stress score increased significantly only in the stress group, indicating that the experimental protocol was a valid means of inducing a stressed state. The neck meridian test score also increased only in the stress group, providing supporting evidence that the neck meridian test is a valid tool for assessing perceived stress. It is suggested that the test could be used in future studies applying techniques of acupuncture and moxibustion medicine to stress care.
An Integrative Psychophysiological Study of Cognitive Function in Active Elderly Rationale, Methods and Initial Results  [PDF]
Shuzhen Zhang, Yukihiro Yada, Akira Tsuda
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.39004
Abstract:

One of the critical issues is that Japan is well known for the world’s highest proportion of elderly people, a super-aged society, and is currently confronting with preventing physical and psychological disability in elderly. In order to reduce the potential risk, we wish the guidance will be suggested to help active elderly around 65 years old have healthy daily life with high quality.

Association of Increased Levels of Happiness with Reduced Levels of Tension and Anxiety after Mental Stress Testing in Japanese College Students  [PDF]
Satoshi Horiuchi, Akira Tsuda, Natsuki Toyoshima, Shuntaro Aoki, Yuji Sakano
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2013.49097
Abstract:

Previous studies from western countries have reported that happy individuals report lower levels of negative mood during and/or following mental stress testing; this finding has not been examined in Japan. This study examined the relationship between happiness, measured using the Subjective Happiness Scale (Lyubomirsky & Lepper, 1999), and negative moods (i.e., tension and anxiety) during and after mental stress testing in Japanese college students. Based on the findings of previous literature and inverse correlations between positive and negative moods, we hypothesized that participants with higher levels of happiness (the higher happiness group, or HG) show significantly lower levels of negative moods and higher levels of positive moods following mental stress testing, compared to participants with lower levels of happiness (the lower happiness group, or LG). Of a total of 392 Japanese undergraduates who participated in a screening survey, those whose scores were one standard deviation higher or lower than the average score were invited to participate in the experiment. Eight HG and nine LG students agreed to participate. A five-minute computerized mental arithmetic task was used to induce stress. The session comprised a five minute pre-task period, a five minute task, and a five minute post-task period. The levels of positive and negative moods during each period were measured retrospectively following each period. Heart rate was measured during the session. Participant heart rate levels and negative moods increased significantly from the pre-task to the task periods, and subsequently decreased during the post-task period. Levels of positive mood decreased from the pre-task to the task period. Negative moods were significantly lower in HGs than in LGs during the post-task period. These results partially supported the hypothesis whereby subjective happiness buffered the impact of stressors on negative moods by influencing post-stress negative mood levels.

 

Evaluation of Decisional Balance in Change of Effective Stress Management Behavior among Chinese University Participants Using Item Response Theory  [PDF]
Ke Deng, Akira Tsuda, Satoshi Horiuchi, Terumi Matsuda
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2013.16003
Abstract:

The transtheoretical model defines behavior change as progression through five stages: precontemplation (not ready), contemplation (getting ready), preparation (readiness), action, and maintenance. Decisional balance (i.e., the relative weight of the pros and cons of making a change) is assumed to mediate stage progression. As one progresses through the stages, the model predicts that the balance of pros increases while that of cons decreases. Previous studies have confirmed this; these results may be attributed to differing response patterns to each item of the decisional balance measure across the stages. This study examines the relationship between decisional balance and the stages of change related to effective stress management behavior (i.e., any healthy activity to manage stress) using a decisional balance measure based on item response theory. The participants were 447 male and 602 female college students. A six-item scale of decisional balance was developed. The balance of pros was significantly higher in later stages such as action and maintenance stages relative to earlier stages such as precontemplation and contemplation stages, while the opposite held for the cons. These results provide strong evidence that the correspondence between decisional balance and the stage of change can be applied to stress management behavior.

Association between Perceived Social Support and Subjective Well-Being among Japanese, Chinese, and Korean College Students  [PDF]
Terumi Matsuda, Akira Tsuda, Euiyeon Kim, Ke Deng
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2014.56059
Abstract:

Subjective well-being (SWB) consists of life satisfaction, the presence of positive affect (PA), and the absence of negative affect (NA). This study examines the associations between perceived social support and SWB among Japanese, Chinese, and Korean college students. We hypothesized that perceived social support will be associated with life satisfaction directly and indirectly through PA and NA among the three groups. A total of 1332 (466 Japanese, 449 Chinese, 417 Korean) college students completed surveys measuring life satisfaction, PA, NA, and perceived social support from family, friends, and a significant other. Results of the path analysis showed that family support reduced NA and significant others support improved PA, and that both of types of support were associated with life satisfaction among the three groups. It was suggested that perceived social support contributes to improve SWB among Japanese, Chinese, and Korean college students.

Effects of Soup Intake for Fourteen Days on the Mood and the Difference in Cortisol of Awakening and Evening in the Clerical Employees: An Effectiveness Study Trial  [PDF]
Jumpei Yajima, Akira Tsuda, Hisayoshi Okamura, Hidenori Urata, Akira Matsubara, Kengo Mihara, Takashi Isomura, Kazuhiko Takeda, Naoki Midoh
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.69108
Abstract: In this study, an investigation based on an effectiveness study trial without special limitations was carried out regarding how 14 days’ continuous soup intake would change the mood of the participants and their salivary cortisol levels between awakening and evening. The participants consisted of 16 healthy workers who agreed to participate in the experiment. The participants led their normal daily lives without consuming soup for the first 14 days (controlled condition), and then consumed their chosen soup once a day, at approximately 3 p.m., for the next 14 days (soup condition). Their salivary cortisol levels were measured when they woke up in the morning (awakening) and at 5 p.m. on the last day of each condition, while their mood was evaluated by questionnaire at 5 p.m. every day. The irritation-anger score of the soup condition was significantly lower than that of the controlled condition, and the difference in the salivary cortisol level between awakening and evening in the soup condition was significantly higher compared with the controlled condition. As a result, this study suggests that continuous soup intake under conditions of free choice in the afternoon at the workplace may be effective in relieving stress of worker’s body and mind.
Relationships between Stages and Processes of Change for Effective Stress Management in Japanese College Students  [PDF]
Satoshi Horiuchi, Akira Tsuda, Janice M. Prochaska, Hisanori Kobayashi, Kengo Mihara
Psychology (PSYCH) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/psych.2012.36070
Abstract: With a primary prevention focus, it would be important to help populations engage in stress management. The Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change is one of potentially useful models to formulate interventions. The model describes behavior change as progression through five stages: precontemplation (not ready), contemplation (getting ready), preparation (ready), action, and maintenance. Processes of change (strategies and techniques to enhance the progression) facilitate stage transition. Their use is hypothesized to depend on stage of change. The processes tend to be used the least at the precontemplation stage. Use of experiential processes (affective and/or cognitive strategies such as seeking information) increase over time and tend to peak at the contemplation or preparation stage and then decease. In contrast, behavioral processes (behavioral strategies such as seeking social support) tend to be used most at the action and/or maintenance stage. This study examined relationships between stages and processes of change for effective stress management. Effective stress management is defined as any form of healthy activity such as exercising, meditating, relaxing, and seeking social support, which is practiced for at least 20 minutes. Four hundred and five Japanese college students participated in this study. A paper-pencil survey was conducted at colleges in Japan. The process use was least in precontemplation. Experiential processes peaked in preparation. Except for one experiential process, no significant difference was found between preparation and maintenance. Behavioral processes peaked in preparation, action, or maintenance. Most of these inter-stage differences of processes are in line with the prediction from the model. This study represented an initial but important test of validity of applying processes of change to stress management. The results partially supported its application.
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