oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 6 )

2018 ( 3 )

2017 ( 4 )

2016 ( 10 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 870 matches for " Agnes Chigona "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /870
Display every page Item
Teen mothers and schooling: lacunae and challenges
Agnes Chigona,Rajendra Chetty
South African Journal of Education , 2008,
Abstract: While many girls who become mothers before completing schooling consider academic qualifications to be very important, they may not be able to succeed academically if the support they need to complete their studies is insufficient. Usually, instead of getting support, the teen mothers endure misunderstandings and pressure. The teen mothers may feel disempowered because they are 'othered' and consequently, they develop forms of resistance which in most cases may foster their failure as learners. Our aim was to find out how much support was offered to these girls to facilitate their schooling, thus making it possible for them to complete their education and become self-reliant. A qualitative research approach was employed to gather information for the study. Teen mothers, their educators, and parents were interviewed to gather information about the girls' schooling situation. The results showed that many teen mothers failed to succeed with schooling because they lacked support to avoid the numerous disruptions to school attendance.
Enhancing Student Engagement with Their Studies: A Digital Storytelling Approach  [PDF]
Eunice Ivala, Daniela Gachago, Janet Condy, Agnes Chigona
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.410A012
Abstract:

Higher education institutions in South Africa are faced with low throughput rates, and the need to enhance students’ interest in their studies is a key objective for higher education institutions. Student engagement is one of the factors shown empirically to enhance student success at higher education institutions. The paper reports on the potential of digital storytelling in enhancing student engagement with their studies, amongst 29 final year pre-service student teachers at a large University of Technology in South Africa, as part of their assessment in their final year professional course. The reason for doing this research was due to the limited adoption of digital storytelling in conventional educational settings globally and the fact that little research has been done internationally and particularly in South Africa, into how digital storytelling can be a vehicle for expanding learning. The study was framed around the engagement construct involving qualitative methods of collecting data. Focus group interviews were conducted with the students and the facilitators of the project to elicit whether the production of digital stories led to student engagement. Focus group interviews were analyzed using inductive strategy. Results showed that the production of digital stories enhanced student engagement with their studies which led to high levels of reflection on the subject matter, which as a result led to a deep understanding of the subject matter. Findings of this study will contribute knowledge in the field which may be valuable in increasing student engagement with their studies.

Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers' experiences
Lena Green,Janet Condy,Agnes Chigona
South African Journal of Education , 2012,
Abstract: We argue that the "community of inquiry" approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman's Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist ofshort stories ofclassroom life designed to elicit children's ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.
Final-year teacher training students' perceptions of THRASS
Janet Condy,Agnes Chigona,Rajendra Chetty,Christa Thornhill
South African Journal of Education , 2010,
Abstract: Our purpose was to see if THRASS (Teaching Handwriting, Reading and Spelling Skills) is a programme that should be taught to Foundation Phase (FP) and Intermediate/Senior Phases (ISP) pre-service teachers at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT). The term 'literacy' is defined as an evolving, developing and complex concept, not only because it describes a set of practices, but also because it is context-driven. The THRASS programme is fundamentally for teaching phonics, and is described as being at the 'word' level teaching of literacy. We argue that word level teaching should be done in context and within texts. A mixed method research design was used in order to provide better understandings and answers to the research question: What are the BEd 4 students' perceptions of THRASS? A questionnaire and two focus group interviews were used to gather data. Qualitative data were analysed, using an inductive approach. The findings confirm that pre-service teachers going to teach in schools feel prepared to teach reading, but not spelling or creative writing.
Teen mothers and schooling: lacunae and challenges
A Chigona, R Chetty
South African Journal of Education , 2008,
Abstract:
An evaluation of the functionality and delivery of websites of political parties in South Africa
Maria Crossland,Wallace Chigona
South African Journal of Information Management , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/sajim.v12i1.453
Abstract: The political communication environment worldwide has been transformed by the Internet with websites providing opportunities for affordable information dissemination and reception. Internationally, a party contesting an election without a website seems impossible today. This exploratory study examines the use of websites by political parties during the 2009 South African elections and investigates the functionality offered by the websites as well as how effectively this functionality is delivered. The study analysed the websites of both large and small political parties. It is worth noting that in spite of the lower Internet penetration rates in South Africa, the majority of political parties contesting the 2009 elections had websites. The study shows that the websites of the larger parties generally offer more functionality than those of the smaller parties, supporting the view of ‘normalisation’ of party competition in cyberspace. However, an analysis of the delivery of the content does not confirm the normalisation effects. How to cite this article: Crossland, M. & Chigona, W., 2010, ‘An evaluation of the functionality and delivery of websites of political parties in South Africa’, SA Journal of Information Management 12(1), Art. #453, 5 pages. DOI: 10.4102/sajim.v12i1.453
The Social and Economic Impacts of Ruaha National Park Expansion  [PDF]
Agnes Sirima
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2016.46001
Abstract: Displacement of people to allow expansion of protected areas involves removing people from their ancestral land or excluding people from undertaking livelihood activities in their usual areas. The approach perpetuates the human-nature dichotomy, where protected areas are regarded as pristine lands that need to be separated from human activities. Beyond material loss, displaced communities suffer loss of symbolic representation and identity that is attached to the place. The aim of this paper was to assess impacts of Ruaha National Park expansions to the adjoining communities. Five villages were surveyed: Ikoga Mpya, Igomelo, Nyeregete, Mahango and Luhango. All participants were victims of the eviction to expand the park borders. Based on the conceptual analysis, major themes generated were: loss of access to livelihood resources, change in resource ownership, conservation costs, resource use conflict, place identity, and the role of power. Similar to previous studies, results show that local communities suffered both symbolic and material loss as a result of park expansion. Furthermore, it has shown that conflicts related to land use changes have roots within (pastoralist vs. farmers; Sangu vs. Sukuma) as well as from the outside. Hence, to better understand resource access and ownership, a deeper understanding of community characteristics/composition and their local interaction is important. Further, park expansion needs to take into consideration human livelihood need.
Developing the language of thinking within a classroom community of inquiry: pre-service teachers’ experiences
L Green, J Condy, A Chigona
South African Journal of Education , 2012,
Abstract: We argue that the “community of inquiry” approach, using reading materials modelled on Lipman’s Philosophy for Children programme, is a theoretically justified and teacher-friendly means of promoting effective thinking skills. The stimulus materials, used by the pre-service teachers, consist of short stories of classroom life designed to elicit children’s ideas for further discussion as a community of inquiry. Research has shown that the community of inquiry approach to classroom discussion is perceived positively by educators and teachers and makes a difference to learners. This study explored how the Intermediate and Senior Phase pre-service teachers experienced a classroom community of inquiry by using a qualitative research design with 47 final year pre-service teachers. Data consisted of written reflections from the whole class and recordings of two focus group interviews with selected individuals from the group. From the analysis of the data, the following themes became evident: personal and professional development, changes in learners, contextual concerns, and curriculum links. We conclude that this approach is a valuable addition to the pedagogical strategies of pre-service teachers.
Uses and gratifications of mobile Internet among South African students
W. Chigona,G. Kamkwenda,S. Manjoo
South African Journal of Information Management , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/sajim.v10i3.329
Abstract:
Management Consulting in Human Resource Management: Central and Eastern European Perspectives in Light of Empirical Experiences  [PDF]
Jozsef Poor, Agnes Milovecz
Journal of Service Science and Management (JSSM) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jssm.2011.43036
Abstract: We analyze the evolution of management consulting in the field of human resources (HR) for the past 20 years in the transitional economies of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). Our framework for HR consultancy is based on extensive professional experience in the region, several sets of multiyear surveys, and a review of the literature. We focus on the evolving HR theory and the current HR practice in Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, and Slovenia. Our paper relies on three major sets of multiyear surveys, conducted by the authors’ direct or indirect involvement. Special attention is paid to HR consulting in multinational firms and public sector organizations.
Page 1 /870
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.