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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 4239 matches for " Abdominal Trauma "
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Penetrating Abdominal Trauma: Experience in A Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Southern Nigeria  [PDF]
Maurice Asuquo, Mark Umoh, Victor Nwagbara, Gabriel Ugare, Cyril Agbor, Emmanuel Japhet
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.35079
Abstract: Background: Penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT) typically involves the violation of the abdominal cavity by a gun-shot wound (GSW) or stab wound Recently several studies have favored a more conservative approach as opposed to mandatory exploratory laparotomy. Methods: Patients admitted in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH), Calabar, with PAT from January 2008 to December 2010 were prospectively studied based on a questionnaire. The total number of patients with PAT was compared with total number of emergencies, traumatic injuries and abdominal trauma seen during the same period. Results: A total of 48 patients presented with abdominal trauma: PAT 29 (60%) and blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) 19 (40%). The ages of the patients (28 male, 1 female) ranged from 3 - 62 years (mean 28.1 years). Gunshot wound (GSW) 11 (38%) patients, stab wound 8 (27.6%) patients and machete cut 4 (13.8%) patients ranked first, second and third respectively as causes of PAT. The commonest organ injury was perforation of the small intestine. Four (13.8%) patients were managed conservatively while 25 (86.2%) patients had laparotomy. The duration of admission ranged from 2 - 19 days (mean 10.5 days). Morbidity [surgical site infection (SSI)] and mortality were recorded in 2 (6.9%) and 3 (10.3%) patients respectively. Conclusion: Key areas that require attention have been highlighted. Revamping the ailing economy and gainful employment for youths are paramount areas that require prompt, dedicated and sustained intervention for reduction in violent crimes.
Blunt Abdominal Trauma in a Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria  [PDF]
Maurice Asuquo, Victor Nwagbara, Mark Umoh, Gabriel Ugare, Cyril Agbor, Emmanuel Japhet, Anthonia Ikpeme
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.37124
Abstract:

Background: Road traffic injury remains a major source of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Road traffic injury and other forms of trauma have become a major health problem throughout the world especially in low and middle-income countries. In a previous study (2005-2007), abdominal trauma constituted 79 (4.8%) of trauma cases; BAT, 40 (53%) and penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT), 39 (47%). Effective policies on road safety should be developed based on local research and not on adapted models. We present this study to highlight the possible effect of legislation on the ban of the use of motorcycles on blunt abdominal trauma. Methods: Patients that presented to the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar with BAT from 2008-2010 were prospectively studied based on a questionnaire following the legislation prohibiting the use of motorcycles. Results: A total of 12,083 patients presented during the study period, trauma patients totaled 4942 (41%), of this, 48 (1%) suffered abdominal trauma: BAT 19 (40%), penetrating abdominal trauma (PAT) 29 (60%). The age range of the patients was from 5 to 48 years (mean 26.6 years) with a M:F = 5.3:1. Road traffic accident (RTA) 17 (90%) [Motorvehicle 7 (37%), motorcycles 10 (53%)] was the commonest cause of trauma. The spleen was the commonest injured organ 14 (74%). Conclusion: Road traffic injury constitutes a public health challenge and the hallmark is prevention. Legislation prohibiting the use of motorcycles may have been responsible for the reduction in BAT.

PRIORIT I N TRATAMENTUL POLITRAUMATISMELOR CRANIO-CEREBRALE I ABDOMINALE
V. Paunescu,Valentina Pop-Began,D. Pop-Began,C. Popescu
Jurnalul de Chirurgie , 2011,
Abstract:
Post-Traumatic Necrohemorragic Pancreatitis Caused by an Air Gun  [PDF]
Rocío González López, Marlen Alvite Canosa, Eva Iglesias Porto, Mohammed Salem Ali, Carlos Gegúndez Gómez, J. Félix Arija Val
Surgical Science (SS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2011.29101
Abstract: Penetrating abdominal trauma is the main cause of pancreatic lesions and delay in diagnosis or treatment can increase morbimortality. We present a case of acute necrohemorrhagic pancreatitis (ANHP) secondary to airgun injury associated with pulmonary embolism caused by the projectile in a 36 year old man. He underwent urgent surgery, appreciating pancreatic contusion but not visualizing the projectile, located by CT scan 3mm from the inferior vena cava. The patient underwent further surgery 48 hours later for necrosectomy and the insertion of an irrigation tube, due to ANHP after the migration of the projectile into the lung. This case underlines the clinical relevance of pancreatic lesion in patients with a penetrating abdominal trauma, the diagnostic difficulty and the surgical strategy, as well as the repercussions of the migration of a foreign body through the blood stream, crossing the right heart chambers and becoming lodged in the lung.
Autopsy-Based Study of Abdominal Traffic Trauma Death after Emergency Room Arrival  [PDF]
Satoshi Furukawa, Satomu Morita, Katsuji Nishi, Masahito Hitosugi
Forensic Medicine and Anatomy Research (FMAR) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/fmar.2015.33013
Abstract: We experienced the autopsy cases that the deceased was alive in emergency room on arrival. Bleeding is the leading cause of preventable death after injury. This retrospective study aimed to characterize opportunities for performance improvements identified in patients who died from traffic trauma and were considered by the quality improvement of education system. We focused the abdominal traffic trauma injury. An autopsy-based cross-sectional study was conducted. A purposive sampling technique was applied to select the study sample of 41 post-mortems of road traffic accident. 16 patients (39.0%) were abdominal trauma injury. The mean period of survival after meeting with accident was 13.5 hours, and compared abdominal trauma death was 27.4 hours longer. In road traffic accidents, the most injured abdominal organs were the liver followed by mesentery. We thought that delayed treatment was associated with immediate diagnostic imaging, and so expected to expand trauma management examination.
Blunt Abdominal Trauma Leading to Pancreatic Injury in Childhood. Delay in Diagnosis Leads to Poor Outcomes—A Case Presentation  [PDF]
Zohaib A. Siddiqui, Fahd Husain, Midhat N. Siddiqui
International Journal of Clinical Medicine (IJCM) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2016.712087
Abstract: This case report illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing paediatric patients with life threatening pancreatic injuries. A high index of suspicion is essential as late diagnosis significantly affects outcomes. A 9-year-old child presented with epigastric pain following an accident on his pushbike. The patient was examined in paediatric accident and emergency (A/E) and was discharged. He returned twice more to A/E and on the third visit, 5 days after the initial incident, a CT scan was performed. This showed a classical injury to the body of the pancreas with a collection in the lesser sac. The patient was transferred to the regional hepato-pancreato-biliary unit (HPB unit) and underwent surgery. Pancreatic injuries can be difficult to detect clinically and patients may be well on initial presentation with normal observations and routine bloods. Early CT scanning confirms the diagnosis and results in early specialist referral and better outcomes.
An Analysis of War Weaponry Trauma Victims from a Medical College Setting in Kashmir Valley  [PDF]
Mumtazdin Wani, Mushtaq Chalkoo, Peer Hilal Ahmad Makhdoomi, Ankush Banotra, Awhad Mueed, Yassar Arafat, Syed Shakeeb
Surgical Science (SS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2017.81002
Abstract: Background: Kashmir valley, being a known conflict zone keeps on receiving war victims due to scuffles between civilians and the government forces. Such upsurges have been noted in the recent past in 2008 and 2010; however, a new face of upheaval took place in the month of July 2016. Herein, we present an analysis of 500 abdominal trauma victims reported to our department at Government Medical College Srinagar, Kashmir, India. Methods: Government Medical College Srinagar Kashmir is a tertiary care teaching hospital situated in the heart of Kashmir valley. Being one of the referral hospitals, for trauma, we received a total figure of 6149 trauma victims out of which 500 were purely of abdominal in nature managed by the department of surgery. The study conducted was a short analysis of these abdominal trauma patients that reported from 8th July to 8th November 2016. Results: The result of analysis of 500 abdominal trauma patients is reported herein. The male female ratio of patients was 19.8:1 (male = 95.2%, female = 4.8%). The age range was from 5 years to 65 years with majority reported in the age range of 15 - 30 years. The number of bullet injuries was =85 and the pellet injuries were =349. The commonest organs involved were small intestines, spleen, large bowel and liver in descending order. Penetrating injuries were seen in =60.4%, non-penetrating were seen in =39.6%. The patients were grouped into conservative, non operative and operative group. The commonest morbidity observed was wound sepsis and a total mortality reached to a figure of 2%. Conclusion: This short study of analysis of trauma victims has explored the newer horizons of trauma management and we believe and conclude that specialized trauma hospitals with skilled manpower and modern gadgets of handling trauma is need of an hour especially in developing countries like ours.
Traumatic Perforation of the Small Intestine in General Surgery of the CHU Gabriel Touré  [PDF]
Alhassane Traoré, Bakary Tientigui Dembélé, Ibrahima Diakité, Adégné Togo, Lassana Kanté, Amadou Traoré, Madiassa Konaté, Boubacar Karembé, Abdoulaye Diarra, Amadou Bah, Boubacar Sidibé, Tany Koné, Astan Koné, Nouténé Koné, Djibo Mahamane Diango, Gangaly Diallo
Surgical Science (SS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2017.89045
Abstract: Goal: To determine hospital frequency, to describe the clinical and therapeutic aspects and to determine the prognosis. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective and prospective study carried out in the General Surgery Department from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2015. Inclusion criteria: 1) open or closed trauma of the abdomen with perforation of the small bowel; 2) clinical examination (abdominal pain, vomiting, fever, abdominal contracture, evisceration, intraoperative findings); 3) paraclinical examinations: pneumoperitoneum on the abdominal X-ray without preparation (ASP) and CT scan. Exclusion Criteria: Abdominal trauma without perforation of the small bowel. We selected 128 patients operated for traumatic perforation of the small bowel. The data was entered and analyzed using Word, Excel 2007 and Statistical Package and Social Science Windows 16.0. The statistical analysis consisted in the calculation of the different frequencies of the variables studied. We used the Khi2 test with significance level P < 0.05. Results: We recorded 119 men versus 9 women and the sex ratio was 13.22. The mean age was 25 years with extremes varying between 15 and 70 years. The majority of patients 57.7% (74 cases) came from the capital, 46.1% (59 cases) were workers, 26.6% (34 cases) of the students. The average time to admission was 29 hours. The main etiologies were road traffic accidents 36.7% (47 cases), stabbing 21.9% (28 cases), firearm 14.8% (19 cases), and sports accidents 10.1% (13 cases). The main clinical signs were abdominal pain 48.44% (62 cases), abdominal contracture 60% (76 cases), disappearance of pre-liver dullness 66.36% (84 cases), and Douglas painful 74.4% (94 cases). The abdominal X-ray without preparation (A.S.P) allowed to objectify a pneumoperitoneum in 45.31% and the scanner a liquid effusion in 45.31% with the associated lesions in 37.5% (48 cases). The surgical treatment consisted of 60.15% suture excision (77 cases), 25% anastomosis resection (32 cases) and a 15% stoma (19 cases). The average length of hospital stay was 9 days with extremes of 1 to 60 days. The morbidity was 10.15% at the site of surgical site (OS) infection 17.4% (8 cases), postoperative peritonitis 3.1% (4 cases) and evisceration 0.8% (1 case). Mortality was 17.18% due to septic shock and multivisceral failure. Conclusion: Traumatic perforation of the small bowel is an emergency. Young people are more victims. The prognosis depends on the speed of diagnosis and management. Emphasis should be
Child Abdominal Trauma Due to Attack of Cattles While Working on Farms in Burkina Faso  [PDF]
Souleymane Ouedraogo, Cyprien Zaré, Maurice Zida, Julien T. Savadogo, Mamadou Windsouri, Edgar Ouangre, Emile Bandre, Simon S. Traore
Surgical Science (SS) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2017.811053
Abstract: Introduction: Cattle are strong animals very often used in agriculture in rural Africa. Unpredictable in their behavior, they regularly inflict injuries to farmers, some of whom are children in rural Africa. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of abdominal trauma caused by bovidae to children on farms in Burkina Faso. Patients and Method: This is a descriptive study covering the period from January 2014 through December 2016 and was conducted in the General Surgery Unit of the Tenkodogo Regional Hospital in Burkina Faso. It included all patients under the age of 17, victims of abdominal trauma by cattle on farms. Result: A total of 68 patients were identified, which is 3% of all patients under 17 admitted to the service during the same period. The average age of patients was 10.5 years, with a standard variation of 3.6 years. The majority (73.5%) of the patients were boys. The main lesional mechanisms found were horn strokes (88.2%). We noted 35 eviscerations without visceral perforation, 15 intestinal perforations, 6 hepatic wounds and 5 splenic wounds. In 7 cases, there were non-penetrating wounds. All patients underwent surgical intervention under anesthesia. The average length of hospital was 6 days. Two deaths were recorded, making a mortality rate of 3%. Conclusion: Abdominal traumas of the child by attack of cattle are frequent during farm works in rural Burkina Faso. The injuries are sometimes serious. Wearing protective equipment for children should be considered during farm work.
Abdominal Trauma: Five Years Experience in National Centre Hospital, Mauritania  [PDF]
A. Moulaye Idriss, Y. Tfeil, J. S. Baba, S. M. Boukhary, B. Hamad, M. Abdllatif, T. A. Kane, M. Abdllahi, B. Moctar, B. Taleb
Open Journal of Emergency Medicine (OJEM) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/ojem.2018.61002
Abstract:
Trauma care including abdominal trauma is a big challenge. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality and continues to be a public health problem worldwide. The main aims of our study were to assess the patterns and outcomes of our patients, and to describe our experience in management of abdominal trauma. This descriptive retrospective study was conducted in general surgery department at National Centre Hospital of Nouakchott in Mauritania. We recruited patients presented at our department with abdominal trauma (2012-2016). Out of 100 cases, 92% were men. Mean age: 22.78 years (5 - 70 years). Eighty percent of patients suffered of penetrating abdominal trauma. Stab injuries were the most frequent mechanism (60%). The commonest organ injury was small intestine (16%). Mortality has been strongly related to road traffic accidents. Cares of severe abdominal traumas are not common in our hospital, due to lack of required overall data. Emergency health system is needed to better care of trauma patients in Mauritania.
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