oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2020 ( 145 )

2019 ( 1030 )

2018 ( 1167 )

2017 ( 1107 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 673300 matches for " A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /673300
Display every page Item
New records of 43 spider species from the Mountain Zebra National Park, South Africa (Arachnida: Araneae)
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2006, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v49i2.113
Abstract: This study forms part of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA), initiated in 1997 with the main aim to create an inventory of the arachnid fauna of South Africa (Dippenaar-Schoeman & Craemer 2000). One of the objectives of SANSA is to assess the number of arachnid species presently protected in conserved areas in the country. Check lists of spiders are now available for three national parks, three nature reserves and a conservancy. These areas include: Mountain Zebra National Park (Dippenaar-Schoeman 1988); Karoo National Park (Dippenaar-Schoeman et al. 1999); Kruger National Park (Dippenaar- Schoeman & Leroy 2002); Roodeplaatdam Nature Reserve (Dippenaar-Schoeman et al. 1989); Makelali Nature Reserve (Whitmore et al. 2001, 2002); Swartberg Nature Reserve (Dippenaar-Schoeman et al. 2005); and the Soutpansberg Conservancy (Foord et al. 2002).
A check list of the pseudoscorpions of South Africa (Arachnida: Pseudoscorpiones)
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,M.S. Harvey
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2000, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v43i2.201
Abstract: A check list of the Pseudoscorpiones of the class Arachnida of South Africa is presented. A total of 135 species and 10 subspecies of pseudoscorpions are known from South Africa, represented by seven superfamilies, 15 families and 65 genera. This represents about 4.4 of the world fauna. Of the 135 species, 97 species (73 ) are known only from South Africa, 33 species have a wider distribution pattern throughout the Afrotropical Region and three are cosmopolitan. This study forms part of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA).
A check list of the spiders of the Kruger National Park, South Africa (Arachnida: Araneae)
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,A. Leroy
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2003, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v46i1.40
Abstract: As part of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA), projects are underway to determine the biodiversity of arachnids present in protected areas in South Africa. Spiders have been collected over a period of 16 years from the Kruger National Park, South Africa. A check list is provided consisting of 152 species, 116 genera and 40 families. This represents about 7.6 % of the total known South African spider fauna. Of the 152 species, 103 are new records for the park. The ground dwelling spiders comprise 58 species from 25 families. Of these, 21 % are web dwellers and 62 % free living, while 17 % live in burrows. From the plant layer, 94 species have been collected of which 53 % were web builders and 47 % free living wandering spiders.
A revision of the Afrotropical species of the genus Tibellus Simon (Araneae: Philodromidae)
A. Van den Berg,A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 1994, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v37i1.327
Abstract: The Afrotropical species of the genus Tibellus Simon, 1875, are revised. Of the 10 previously recognised species of long-bodied grss spiders from this region, eight are redescribed and figured. Two species, T. punctifasciatus Strand, 1906, and T. robustus Simon, 1886, are considered nomina dubia. Five new species, T. cobusi, T. gerhardi, T. nimbaensis, T. somaliensis and T. sunetae, are described and three previously recognised subspecies of T. vossioni Simon, 1884, namely T. v. armatus Lessert, 1928, T. v. flavipes Caporiacco, 1941, and T. v. minor Lessert, 1919, are given species status. The genus Tibellinus Simon, 1910, is a junior synonym of Tibellus. Tibellinus australis is transferred to the genus Tibellus. The males of T. armatus stat. nov. and T. hollidayi Lawrence, 1952, are described for the first time. A key to 17 recognised species is given. Distributional data are provided for all species.
A checklist of spiders from Sovenga Hill, an inselberg in the Savanna Biome, Limpopo Province, South Africa (Arachnida: Araneae)
M.A. Modiba,S.M. Dippenaar,A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2005, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v48i2.95
Abstract: The South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA) was initiated to make an inventory of the arachnid fauna of South Africa. Various projects are underway to prepare inventories of the spider fauna of the different floral biomes and provinces of South Africa. During April and May 2004 five different collecting methods were sed to sample spiders from four slopes on Sovenga Hill, an inselberg situated in the Savanna Biome, near Polokwane, in the Limpopo Province of South Africa. A total of 793 specimens represented by 29 families, 62 genera and 76 species were recorded over the twomonth period. The Thomisidae was the most abundant (n = 167) representing 21.1 % of all spiders sampled, followed by the Gnaphosidae (n = 101) with 12.7 % and the Lycosidae (n = 77) with 9.7 %. The most abundant species was a thomisid Tmarus comellini Garcia-Neto (n = 82), representing 10.3 % of the total, followed by a clubionid Clubiona godfreyi Lessert (n = 66) with 8.3 %. The Thomisidae was the most species-rich family with 12 species, followed by the Gnaphosidae with 11 species and the Araneidae with 10 species. Of the species collected 83.9 % were wandering spiders and 16.1 % web builders. This is the first quantitative survey of the Savanna Biome in the Polokwane area.
The biodiversity and species composition of the spider community of Marion Island, a recent survey (Arachnida: Araneae)
T.T. Khoza,S.M. Dippenaar,A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2005, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v48i2.94
Abstract: Marion Island, the larger of the Prince Edward Islands, lies in the sub-Antarctic biogeographic region in the southern Indian Ocean. From previous surveys, four spider species are known from Marion. The last survey was undertaken in 1968. During this study a survey was undertaken over a period of four weeks on the island to determine the present spider diversity and to record information about the habitat preferences and general behaviour of the species present. Three collection methods (active search, Tullgren funnels and pitfall traps) were used, and spiders were sampled from six habitat sites. A total of 430 spiders represented by four families were collected, Myro kerguelenesis crozetensis Enderlein, 1909 and M. paucispinosus Berland, 1947 (Desidae), Prinerigone vagans (Audouin, 1826) (Linyphiidae), Cheiracanthium furculatum Karsch, 1879 (Miturgidae) and an immature Salticidae. The miturgid and salticid are first records. Neomaso antarticus (Hickman, 1939) (Linyphiidae) was absent from samples, confirming that the species might have been an erroneous record.
Spinnekopdiversiteit van die Suid-Afrikaanse Savanna Bioom
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,S.H. Foord,C.R. Haddad
Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie , 2012, DOI: 10.4102/satnt.v31i1.338
Abstract:
South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA): Solifugae (sun-spiders) of the national parks and reserves of South Africa (Arachnida, Solifugae)
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,A.X. González Reyes
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2006, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v49i2.114
Abstract: As part of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA) inventories are underway to determine the diversity of the South African Arachnida fauna (Dippenaar- Schoeman & Craemer 2000). Several SANSA projects are in progress, including inventories of the arachnid faunas of protected areas. One such project is an inventory of the Solifugae (sun spiders) from protected areas. Meaningful conservation can not take place if the species involved are not known.
Habitat preferences and seasonal activity of the Microstigmatidae from Ngome State Forest, South Africa (Arachnida: Araneae)
A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,M. van der Merwe,A.M. van den Berg
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2006, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v49i1.91
Abstract: As part of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA) inventories are underway to determine the arachnid biodiversity of various biomes. Asurvey of groundliving spiders was conducted over a year period (1992-1993) at Ngome State Forest, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Spiders were collected with 180 pitfall traps from five different habitat types ranging from indigenous forest to a pine plantation and grassland. A total of 186 specimens of the rare Mygalomorphae family Microstigmatidae were sampled, representing 2 % of the total spider fauna collected during the study. Two species, Microstigmata longipes (Lawrence) and M. zuluensis (Lawrence), occur sympatrically. Both species were more active in the indigenous forest, and were absent or present in low numbers in the open grass and pine plantation. Microstigmata zuluensis was slightly more abundant (59 % of total) and was recorded from three of the five habitats, while M. longipes (41 %) was found in four of the habitat types. Both species were active throughout the year with the lowest numbers recorded in winter (June to August). The males of M. longipes peaked in November while those of M. zuluensis peaked in April.
A checklist of the non-acarine arachnids (Chelicerata: Arachnida) of the Ndumo Game Reserve, Maputaland, South Africa
C.R. Haddad,A.S. Dippenaar-Schoeman,W. Weso?owska
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science , 2006, DOI: 10.4102/koedoe.v49i2.116
Abstract: Arachnids (Chelicerata: Arachnida) were collected in the Ndumo Game Reserve (Maputaland, South Africa) during 11 collecting trips in the period 2000–2006. Sampling was undertaken by various methods in eight broad habitat types: Acacia tortilis savanna; Acacia xanthophloea (fever tree) forests; deciduous broadleaf woodland; Ficus (wild fig tree) forests; floodplain vegetation; riparian forest; sand forest; and subtropical bush. In total, 457 species of arachnids were collected, representing six orders, 59 families and 240 determined genera. The most diverse order was the Araneae (46 families, 431 spp.), followed by the Pseudoscorpiones (6 families, 12 spp.), Scorpiones (3 families, 8 spp.), Opiliones (2 families, 3 spp.), Solifugae (1 family, 2 spp.) and Amblypygi (a single species). The most diverse families all belonged to the Araneae: Salticidae (82 spp.), Thomisidae (56 spp.) and Araneidae (38 spp.). The spider diversity is the highest recorded from any protected area in South Africa so far, and represents approximately 22 % of the country’s spider fauna. The habitat and guild associations of each species are provided.
Page 1 /673300
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.